Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice

Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice

Audiobook(CD - Unabridged, 3 CDs, 3 hrs. 40 min.)

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Overview

Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice by Phillip Hoose, Channie Waites

On March 2, 1955, a slim, bespectacled teenager refused to give up her seat to a white woman on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Shouting “It’s my constitutional right!” as police dragged her off to jail, Claudette Colvin decided she’d had enough of the Jim Crow segregation laws that had angered and puzzled her since she was a young child.

But instead of being celebrated, as Rosa Parks would be when she took the same stand nine months later, Claudette found herself shunned by many of her classmates and dismissed as an unfit role model by the black leaders of Montgomery. Undaunted, she put her life in danger a year later when she dared to challenge segregation yet again — as one of four plaintiffs in the landmark busing case Browder v. Gayle.

Based on extensive interviews with Claudette Colvin and many others, Phillip Hoose presents the first in-depth account of a major, yet little-known, civil rights figure whose story provides a fresh perspective on the Montgomery bus protest of 1955–56. Historic figures like Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rosa Parks play important roles, but center stage belongs to the brave, bookish girl whose two acts of courage were to affect the course of American history.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781441802361
Publisher: Brilliance Audio
Publication date: 12/10/2009
Edition description: Unabridged, 3 CDs, 3 hrs. 40 min.
Product dimensions: 5.10(w) x 7.10(h) x 1.50(d)
Age Range: 13 - 17 Years

About the Author

Phillip Hoose is an award-winning author of books, essays, stories, songs and articles. Although he first wrote for adults, he turned his attention to children and young adults in part to keep up with his own daughters. Claudette Colvin won a National Book Award and was dubbed a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2009. He is also the author of Hey, Little Ant, co-authored by his daughter, Hannah, It's Our World, Too!, The Race to Save the Lord God Bird, and We Were There, Too!, a National Book Award finalist. He has received a Jane Addams Children's Book Award, a Christopher Award, and a Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, among numerous honors. He was born in South Bend, Indiana, and grew up in the towns of South Bend, Angola, and Speedway, Indiana. He was educated at Indiana University and the Yale School of Forestry. He lives in Portland, Maine.

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Claudette Colvin 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Everyone who is reading this please keep reading. I read this book and it was amazing!!! Claudette is trying to tell yoi guys to treat everyone equal and not how they look or there skin tone.i loved this book and i hope everyone will read it amd learn not to treat others differently. Those people are like you. Remember that next time you judge someone. Also, when you say somethimg if it is hurtful and it will hurt others think about what your about to say before you say it. Im 11 and i am saying all of this. I hope you enjoy it
Mdesmondobrien More than 1 year ago
When 15-year-old black high schooler Claudette Colvin refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Alabama bus in March of 1955, it helped to spark the civil rights movement that would give us such celebrated national heroes as Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks. But what happened to passionate, opinionated Claudette, whose actions were condemned even by her own community as headstrong and foolish? In three words: I loved it! Truly excellent young adult nonfiction is hard to find, much less nonfiction about subjects I actually want to read about. Twice Towards Justice scores on both those counts. While I was reading this book, the thing that struck me the most was how on earth Claudette's incredible story could have flown under the radar for so long. In an era of political correctness, it seems like we're stuck inside a perpetual time warp of Rosa Parks-instead of studying heroes and heroines that are easier for teens to relate to, specifically, other teens. Hoose's voice is unflinchingly, refreshingly honest-giving us some frank yet sympathetic perspective on Claudette's story. My personal favorite chapter was "We Seem to Hate Ourselves", detailing Claudette's experiences at an all-black high school where girls spent hours straightening their hair and attempting to lighten their skin to look more "white". When Claudette left her hair in its thick, unruly curls, she was teased by her peers and even other, adult members of her community. Interestingly, the reason I could relate to this was because I watch my (white) peers spending hours attempting to look more "ghetto", while also watching my (black and Hispanic) peers agonizing over their curves. Apparently, some things never change. And that's what seems to be the underlying message in this book-that you don't need to be a hero to make a difference, that standing up for your rights as a human being is a fight that never ends-whether it's your right for better transportation and education, or your right to dress the way you'd like without ridicule.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its ok
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RN More than 1 year ago
This book shows how history can be manipulated. Claudette refused to give up her seat on the bus before Rosa Parks did. But unlike Rosa Parks, Claudette didn't have an NAACP lawyer ready to bail her out after her arrest. It was her arrest and subsequent court case that ended segregation on buses.
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RobinsSam More than 1 year ago
Very informative and good reading for anyone in knowing history related to the Civil Rights Movement. I had always been taught that Rosa Parks was the first person to refuse to move from her seat on a Montgomery Alabama bus. Very good information in the book. I will read this again.
nileriver More than 1 year ago
This was a great book to read about a young girls journey on to the civil rights movement that paved the way for equal rights . I would recommend all young readers to read this book so that they can learn more about history and the true account stories of people who have lived through that era of unfair justice .
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im reading this book at school. Iove it. Its so interesting
lauren_21 More than 1 year ago
Remember the story about Rosa Parks who refused to move to the back of the bus back in 1956? Well how about the story about Claudette Colvin? Sound familiar? Probably not, she was just a teenager when she refused to move her seat, a year before Rosa Parks did. This true story is not only informational, but it is so touching and shows young readers just how times were during the segregation. Claudette Colvin was and still is a brave woman for having the courage to stand up for what she was felt was right. This book discusses topics such as segregation, the bus boycott, and more issues during that year (1955). This is a must read book for children learning about segregation for pleasure or for school.