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Cloning Christ
     

Cloning Christ

4.1 35
by Peter Thomas Senese
 
The theological thrill ride, darting from Israel through Europe to the United States, focuses on Dr. Max Train, a leading genetic scientist from Syracuse, New York. Max was once a devout believer in God, but now lives a faithless life following the brutal slaying of his beloved wife and four-year-old autistic daughter twelve years ago.

Years after the widely

Overview

The theological thrill ride, darting from Israel through Europe to the United States, focuses on Dr. Max Train, a leading genetic scientist from Syracuse, New York. Max was once a devout believer in God, but now lives a faithless life following the brutal slaying of his beloved wife and four-year-old autistic daughter twelve years ago.

Years after the widely publicized trial during which Max is rightfully found innocent of his family's murder, pinned on him by corrupt dark forces, Max vacations in Israel. During an earthquake outside of Jerusalem, he discovers what appears to be the Cross Jesus of Nazareth was crucified on nearly two thousand years ago. A mysterious explosion destroys the cave where Max had secretly extracted the ancient artifacts, killing, Train believes, his best friend Dr. Luke Gardner and two graduate students he was in Israel with. Moments later, Max's body is hit with a sea of bullets as the morning sun begins to rise over The Holy Land.

Max may hold the fate of mankind in his hands. If this is the True Cross and Christ was cloned from the remaining blood stains and hair remnants on the cross, would government and religion become obsolete upon His Second Coming? If the blood stains and hair are those of Jesus, then what does this say about the long held belief Christ rose whole and entire upon his resurrection? Where would the battle lines be drawn between the advances in science and the beliefs of religion? What effect would this knowledge have on one's faith and beliefs?

In the hallowed halls of the Vatican a righteous Cardinal, Anselm Mugant, hears of the discovery in Jerusalem. Without the Pope's knowledge and in clear opposition to all Catholic teaching, the wayward prelate will stop at nothing - even murder - in his bid to prevent human cloning. Mugant soon enlists the services of the internationally rumored assassin known simply as The Scorpion to track down Max and silence him with death. The Scorpion, a onetime penitent of the Cardinal, is a force of pure evil and who challenges life. He forces this same challenge onto Max as he casts a deadly shadow over his praised soul and every move he makes. Adding intricate subterfuge to the plot is the existence of Mugant's ‘Fifth Crusade’, individuals with great power and reach devout to the Cardinal. Together, Mugant launches an all-out attack to find the ancient artifacts in Train's possession, and prevents the genetic scientist from doing the unthinkable in his eyes - announcing to the world a cross containing bodily remnants could indeed be the True Cross of Jesus of Nazareth - and clone the body of Christ!

Product Details

BN ID:
2940014280990
Publisher:
Pacifica Publishing
Publication date:
03/08/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
334
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Peter Thomas Senese is a best-selling author writing primarily in geopolitical historical fiction. Other written works by Peter include CHASING THE CYCLONE, THE DEN OF THE ASSASSIN, PREDATORS GAMES (Fall 2012), and QUEST (Spring 2013). Peter Thomas Senese is a vocal child advocate and has actively been engaged in a host of legislative initiatives that will aid children at risk of international kidnapping. He has co-authored the landmark resource guide on international parental child abduction titled THE WORLD TURNED UPSIDE DOWN, created and produced the highly educational documentary film on child abduction titled CHASING PARENTS: Racing Into The Storms Of International Parental Child Abduction, and has co-authored several landmark research reports on this subject. Peter Thomas Senese's activity on behalf of children also include his support and activism in the creation of the states of California and New York's new laws against online malicious impersonation. Peter is an active supporter of literacy programs and public libraries, and a self-professed Librophiliac. He is presently working on new legislation that will protect children from international abduction and human trafficking. He shares his time between New York City and Los Angeles, and is actively involved in numerous storytelling projects.

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Cloning Christ 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Most of the positive reviews here are "anonymous" and were likely written by this book's author.  "Cloning Christ" is as horrific as Peter Senese's other writing attempts.  He is a con artist with an immense ego and has created many false characters in himself.  "Best selling author" and "critically acclaimed author" are only two.  This particular novel was one of his many scams.  Just read a few pages and you can easily see that he is a fraud.  For the extremely dense folks who absolutely love overuse of adjectives, I suppose this book would be a great read -- but not if those folks expect to actually read a story.  Peter's laughable writing style has been the butt of many internet jokes and discussions.  Don't waste your money or time on any of his pathetic books.  By the way, he was arrested (yet again) this year for his most recent scam, which involved conning the parents of abducted children.  If that isn't bad enough, it also involved stolen valor.  
Guest More than 1 year ago
I listened to this as an audio book. In retrospect, I should have checked it out from the library rather than purchasing it. It started out with an exciting discovery of what may have been the Cross. It caught my attention at the beginning, however, the poor editing became obvious early (I'm giving the writer the benefit of doubt here...) - in spite of it having been 'read' in audio format. I found myself wanting to edit what I was hearing. Senese's editor should find another line of work. Phrases I would use to describe this book: superfluous & tediously repetitious descriptions, inconsistent syntax, structurally unstable, & unconvincing dialogue. I would not purchase a sequel. I'm not even sure I would waste the time with a library version. Time would be better served listening (or reading) Peterson's 'The Message'.
Guest More than 1 year ago
WHEN I STARTED READING THIS BOOK I COULD NOT PUT IT DOWN. A MUST READ,I WOULD RECOMEND THIS BOOK TO ANYONE.WONDERFULLY WRITTEN, IT'S LIKE YOU ARE THERE.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This 'book' is terribly written, horribly plotted, barely edited, and unattractively formatted. If you're used to a reading experience that meets minimum standards (at the least), you'll find this unbearably painful. Cliches abound, sentences go on forever but say nothing, the punctuation is inconsistent, the grammar is questionable, and even the spelling is often wrong. As you can tell, I didn't care for the book at all. There is nothing redeeming about this novel.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The character development in this story is outstanding, and so too is the subject matter which Senese tackles. Clearly, he takes a stance against human cloning, but challanges the reader to think about the medical ramifications of science in a positive manner. Most of all, this is a book about a man who lost is faith. Something most of us can releate to, I think. Overall, I highly recommend Cloning Christ. Warning: there is harsh violence in this book and the use of light, but relevant vulgar language.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One of the more clever aspects of the fast-paced and provocative spins by Peter Senese in his latest novel, CLONING CHRIST, is how the author didn't force traditional facets of Christiandom onto the reader, but carefully create a thrilling set of scenarios that enivitably bring your thoughts about your own existance. If you're like me and like fast-paced suspense, I think you'll love CLONING CHRIST. With so many books calling themselves suspense/thrillers/mystery, etc, it is actually a treat when you locate a book that keeps you on your seat, or couch. This is one of those books you don't put down.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought the way the authors presented the ideas of faith in this strong thriller were outstanding.
Guest More than 1 year ago
and never lets you sit still. As a page-turner, very few books I have read brought out introspective subject matter the way this book does. If you're caught up in the Da Vinci craze, you will love Senese's Cloning Christ. I did.
Guest More than 1 year ago
With so much talk about The Da Vinci Code going on, a friend suggested since I enjoyed Dan Brown's story so much, that I might enjoy reading Peter Senese's Cloning Christ. There are some striking similarities between the two books in that both stories rely on the reader's perspective of faith to guide you to the inevitable 'what if?' endings. Also, the stories use female side-kicks to guide the story's main protagonist. Historically and educationally, it is very clear the authors' did more than their fair share of research. Most of all, both books excel the reader into frenetic concentration . . . so intriguing are the two stories. So what differentiates the two stories? A great deal. The characters in Cloning Christ stand out as a large, diverse, and eclectic cast. Broadly, but with razor-edge purpose Senese's ensemble of characters represent the spectrum of human emotion, human circumstance, man's faith in self, man's faith in one-another, righteousness vs. the self-righteous, good vs. evil, and those who support science vs. those who support theological procreation. The blend is perfect; the characters move in and out of the story, each leaving an impact on the scene they were in. From the onset, the readers become very attached, as if one, with Cloning Christ's protagonist, Train, as well as Sara. In The Da Vinci Code, the readers have little attachment to the protagonist, Langdon, but eventually come very close to Sophie. Historically, there were many questions I asked my self, and many facts that were pointed out to me . . . in both books. Landscapes and settings were terrific. In Cloning Christ the author's description of the city geography and its historical significance stand out. In The Da Vinci Code, the author's description of the historical significance of various paintings and artifacts stand out. Though not in the class of The Da Vinci Code in terms of the history lesson, Cloning Christ is a close second. Most of all the one difference between the two books is also the common thread that draws them together. In The Da Vinci Code, the author Brown addresses the 'sanguine' or possible bloodline of Christ, which in itself speaks volumes about who exactly Jesus was. In Cloning Christ, the author Senese addresses the human body form of Jesus, questioning through a blood, what exactly Jesus did on the Cross? In both stories, the thread of commonality is based upon the identity of Jesus Christ and is tied to your own faith. Here's the big difference between these two wonderful books: during my read of Cloning Christ I actually felt I was carrying the True Cross of Christ, and wondered what in the world I should do with it?
Guest More than 1 year ago
Senese compels you to embark upon this gripping tale of an outcast, faithless scientist who becomes the possible discoverer of the Cross of Christ by mesmerizing the reader¿s own conscious state of thought by subtly challenging you to think about the theological and scientific subject matter the author presents. Very few novels I have read actually left a longing impact. In his thrill-ride titled ¿Cloning Christ¿ Senese provokes the challenge of how science should respect faith, and how religion should seek truth in science. Simply put: Outstanding.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Nice cover; but nothing in between.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Few books I have read show the complexity of man's human spirit the way Cloning Christ does. In this action thriller evolving around the topic of man finding or regaining his faith in a Higher Being, Senese's two highly developed main characters, Dr. Max Train, and Anselm Cardinal Mugant portray our ability to act in righteousness (Train) or self-rightousness (Mugant) in a way that allows the reader to take a deep look at their own actions. The story is cleverly written, with many subplots that keep the story tightly together, all along asking the question of what would you do if you found the Cross of Jesus of Nazareth, and what would it mean if this cross had bodily remains on it? In addition, the story brings to the forefront the debate and issues pertaining to the use of genetic science for man's benefit. The settings of the action provides for a fresh, educational, and historical breath to push the story, though in reality, the hunt for Train by Mugant (and his menacing assassin) needs no push. With a great plot, an important set of questions, deeply developed characters, and majestic settings, I enjoyed this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Poorly written, needed editing. Full of stereotypes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved the detail and texture of this book-- rich in description, sinewy in its phrasing, and definitely ripping in its speed of change. The character of Max Train, genetic scientist whose find of the Cross of Christ brings him face to face with interior and exterior barbarisms; Cardinal Mugant, a Vatican cleric without conscience or honor whose only satisfaction is magnifying and exploiting the weaknesses of those whom he controls; a Jewish Rabbi and a cancer ridden Pope who are at the opposite end of Mugant's ironic pathologies; a major character in the book's febrile figure, The Scorpion, who probably exposes for the reader all the elements of hate that lie within the soul of every human; and the gentle, but persistent Sara, whose care for Max Train brings Max to a new genre-- a genre called salvation. The action in the book is never slow, as we dash from assassins on Joppa Road to Tel Aviv airport. Deplaning at DaVinci aeroporto in Rome, the intensity of the hunt for Train swells to a crescendo of blackening shawdows hell bent on killing this discoverer of the Cross of Christ. Will geneticist Train commit a sacrilege and try to bring Christ back to life in a second coming? On to Bologna, Lake Como, Zurich-- then to Edinburgh where the action bloodies as death walks in our wake at every turn. At the Isle of Skye a well thought out escape story confronts the reader as the writers of this novel show their skill at bringing surprise upon surprise. I will not answer the question if Christ is cloned in the novel, but leave it to the reader to take up this book and turn the pages of a powerfully plotted narrative which is worth reading-- and rereading. You will learn much about yourself in reading this work, and much more about how a good novel uses the correct language, as this one does, to make you feel that you have been part of the story itself-- from the very beginning to the very end.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The best novel of the year. A theological thrill ride that gives the reader everything he or she could possibly want in this kind of novel - a wounded hero, a tough babe, over the top villains, exotic locations, plot twists galore and a brain.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Senese's CLONING CHRIST is an action-packed novel that dives deep into one's inner-spirit. The premise: A bitter man who no longer beleives in anything or anyone suddenly discovers an ancient artifact that may contain the Blood of Christ. Brilliantly, the struggle to understand, accept, and beleive what he holds begin - while running for his own very life, as death's grip chases him. The story of Max Train is deep, meaningful,and gripping! I highly recommend this fanciful novel.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The many wonderful accolades written about Peter Senese and his newest novel 'Cloning Christ' are true except for one issue: It seems Mr. Senese could have removed the use of vulgar language used on occassion and replaced this language with a more appropriate set of words so not to offend some of his readers. Though moderatly used, I am hesitant to give this book to my teenage daughter to read, though on the merit of the storyline and subject matter, I would have preferred to do so. A gifted and skilled writer such as Mr. Senese does not need to use profane words into his text to enrich the characters or storyline. I still highly recommmend this book, and would have given it an 'outstanding' ranking if not for the language issue. As for the plot of 'Cloning Christ' this story created by Peter Senese is going to be hard to out due. This is a great thriller deep in history and education, one, I might add that brings the reader into the story itself.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Yes, Cloning Christ is a wonderful thriller, and from what I have read from other reviewers, there is a strong sense of appreciation for this writer's style of creating multi-faceted intrigue. Though I have only read this one novel by Peter Senese, I will agree with the strong praise others have passed on. However, for as much as Senese created a gripping tale in his novel, the suspense is far surpassed and outdone by the author's outstanding handling of matters of faith and genetics. What I was most pleased with is that Peter Senese takes a position in his book and holds to it! It could have been easy, and to this affect, common, to write a story that actually has Christ cloned. Senese does not go here, but brings the reader into more realistic issues of how science and faith should and could exist together. Nevertheless, there are tremendous biblical and theological overtures, the characters that push the multifaceted story are unique and most enjoyable for who they are and what they represent, and, the useage of language and rhetoric is so precise it is a testiment to the well read, well studied.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great read. The plot-- a geneticist possibly finds the Cross of Christ while excavating in Jerusalem-- is sharpened, emboldened, and made far more vicious when the Vatican enters the picture believing the geneticist may try to clone remnants of Christ from the Cross. Join this battle as geneticist Max Train is pursued relentlessly by a blackmailed ensemble of misdirected moguls at the direction of the Vatican's Curial overseer, Anselm Mugant. A great character portrayal of Mugant shows up in every chapter as we see to what lengths a violated religious belief can invoke merciless revenge and retribution. The character of the assassin, known simply as The Scorpion, and once one who confessed his faults to Mugant in the confessional, lends a Nietzchean turbo that drives the novel to extremes of fear and demonic rejoicing. Intrigue. murder, fasinating insights into how the internet is used to track down anyone-- I recommend this novel to anyone and would like to see what happens next. A follow-up novel would make for a great encore.
Guest More than 1 year ago
First of all, I have to say I'm an atheist so I would never have picked this book up from a bookstore. But one of my friends (thanks Paula!) gave me her copy of the book and kept going on about how terrific it was so late one night when I couldn't get to sleep (stress! exams! stress!), I took a deep breath and started reading. I was still reading when it was time to get ready for class next morning. I couldn't believe that I had stayed up all night reading this book. I loved it! While there is plenty of religious talk, it is also a full throttle thriller with assassins, chase sequences, shoot-outs and anything else a thriller fan might crave. This is a book I will be telling all my friends about (if Paula has gotten to them first!).
Guest More than 1 year ago
It is rare that a novel has the rhetorical demarche that Cloning Christ exhibits, but it is there in masterpiece fashion. As a professor of English at my University, I found the deployment of the rhetorical device known as antirrhesis in the character of the novel's wayward Cardinal Mugant brilliant: he has been made, through his dialogue, his use of speech, to be a despicable figure. The authors immediately though at the same time make all that for which he stands in the reader's mind as equally repugnant. This is a masterly use of antirrhesis that one rarely sees executed, much less so well, but it is here in Cloning Christ. The authors' use of rhetorical apatesis-- wherein an argument early on is set aside only much later to become the bellows of fearful scream in the workings of the antagonist-- is brilliant. The authors have the Vatican Cardinal lying in wait on frequent occasion to pounce upon his revenge opportunity, and this is skilfully carried out in another select use of the rhetorical instrumentality of apatesis. What gives it the exact pulse of pleasantry to the reader is the timing of Anselm Mugant's revenge-- as in the Belvedere Castle in Central Park. Effective plots require effective timing, and in the use of rhetorical tools in this book the authors display a deft touch at gaining the reader's involvement-- and I dare say, understanding. More than that, in the use of the rhetorical devices the two auhors have chosen the reader's own emotions are taken up into the plot of the novel, its movements, its imagery. This gives to the reader's own experience a communion with the characters of the plot that is difficult to reach for many authors. But not, apparently, for Senese or Geis. The excellent employment of rhetorical dinumeratio stands out in this book: the reader is always caught up to the moment with the action through brief, yet satisfying, recaps along the book's way tso that the reader is never lost as to exactly where he has been-- and where he most likely is to go next. Yet the dinumeratio never takes on a form of overt recapitulation or recounting-- it is more that the authors have woven the text in such a way that the past in the novel as recapitulated blends into the present in the reader's mind as naturally as if it were the reader's own experiences that were being recounted. I compliment the author's in this superb use of recapitulation and recall for the reader. It makes the story more absorbing, more appreciated and understood, and always alive to the reader's thoughts of how he would act/react in the same circumstances as the novel's characters themselves would or would not. Here you have Senese and Geis just about making you part of the novel itself, for heaven's sake. What a great bit of writing in that itself! The novel's perfect use of rhetorical peristrophe-- wherein the authors use the arguments of those who believe violence against scientists who adovcate cloning is the key to 'God's Way'-- is beyond the successful use of irony itself in the book, which use of irony itself is frequent and subtle. There is a certain 'British' way with some of the expressions that the reader is glad to see in that he is taken out of the drab use of sterile language form that one sees in many American novels. The authors here have many of their contemporaries beat in how language and phraseology is given many twists to fit exactly the moment in which the novel's characters utter or think a word or phrase. I have to believe the authors were well trained in the classics and the use of rhetorical device to be able to come to such a coquettish at times use of language for the novel's overall purpose. I recommend this book then for its what I have to but call in all candor 'magisterial' use of language in description, in evoking emotion and catharsis, in engendering at times fear and palpatation both of the heart and the memory. I recommend the book for how in making the reader, through its revolv
Guest More than 1 year ago
What first hooked me on this book is how effective Peter Senese challanges you to think about your own faith (I footnote this by saying I am a Christian). What better a plot than to hand someone what might be The True Cross of Christ -- one tainted with blood on it? Could this blood be the blood of Christ, and if so, are you holding The Son of God in your hand? Wow! What does this mean of His assenscion? The challanges and conflicts Senese presents in handing the reader, and Dr. Max Train -- the story's protagonist -- this Cross are tremendous. So too is the fact there are individuals within the Christian world who believe Dr. Train -- once a devout believer, but now left without any faith in God -- has intent to clone what may be the body of Christ. And this is where the fun begins! Anselm Mugant, a Cardinal Vicker within the Holy See is so absorbed with the issues of human cloning, that upon his discovery that the genetic scientist Train is in possession of The Cross, he calls for his immediate execution. From Jerusalem through Europe, Train is hunted by The Scorpion, an assassin symbolically created to represent The Devil. While Train is hunted, the inner journey of his reawakening begins! From The Holy Land, where Trains discovery occurs, through Europe's Italy and Scotland, the symbolic settings add great historical depth to this terrific book. I enjoyed the writer's style and approach to the very complex issues he cleverly addresses. Most of all, Cloning Christ reminds me of The Story of Job. This is an outstanding Christian read: clean, biblically accurate, conscious of Christian faith, and highly suspensful. I also would like to point out, and applaude the author in his handling of the cloning issue as it pertains to Our Lord: Senese, and so, Dr. Train, are not high-flying individuals who support the issue of cloning. In fact, Train and the story's premise is very clear: to Clone Christ is to simply follow the great teachings of Jesus, or for this matter, any individuals who acted in thoughtfulness towards society. I loved this book in how it addresses the issues of cloning and how Senese clearly demonstrates a Christian view on the subject of human cloning and medicinal genetics. I highly recommend this book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Despite - or perhaps becuase of - a provocative title, I immediately grabbed this book upon seeing it on the shelf in my local Barnes & Noble. It took me a while to get around to reading it but once I opened up to the first scene, I was kicking myself for not having read it immediately. This is a truly terrific work of fiction. As someone who has never been overseas, I especially appreciated the descriptions of the many exotic locations that the hero finds himself. I felt like I was actually there in those locations. Great work, Mr Senese and Mr Geis. Cloning Christ is just an amazing book and hopefully just the beginning in a series of provocative, well written novels. I recommend this novel to anyone who loves a good read and not only wants to be entertained but also wants to think outside the square.
Guest More than 1 year ago
CLONING CHRIST is one of the most wonderfully exiting and complex thrill rides that I have been taken on by a novel for quite some time. Peter Senese also wrote the financial thriller WAR ON WALL STREET which you may have heard of. This time he teams up with Robert Geis to spin an intriguing and throught provoking tale of a genetic scientist who discovers what may in fact be the True Cross and is thrust into a treacherous and mind blowing game of cat and mouse courtesy of an evil cardinal in the Vatican who will stop at nothing - not even murder - to rid the world not only of the scientist but also the ability for humans to clone. This is a novel that makes the reader ponder life's questions. If Christ was indeed cloned, what would that do to religion and government? Would one or both become obsolete? No wonder the cardinal wants our hero dead. Although of course nothing is what it seems and everyone has an agenda. Will the scientist in fact clone Christ? The only way to find out is to read this amazing novel - CLONING CHRIST by Peter Senese with Robert Geis. Highly recommended.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There are two significant strenghts to CLONING CHRIST: the first is the way the authors cultivate and develope the novel's storyline of Max Train's quest to hold onto his life ----and believe in something or someone. The second strenght is the authors' writing style and the ability to allow the reader to feel as if she/he is actually in Mount Olivet, or Rome ---sitting on the Spanish Steps, or racing through St. Peter's Square in the middle of the night --- or walking the portico's of Bologna with menacing bats flying overhead --- or seeing the mist rising from Italy's Lake Como or Switzerland's Lake Zurich --- or hearing the thunder rolling from the mountains of the Juegenfraur in Switzerland while lightening races before your eyes --- or hearing the bloodthristy hounds seeking you while your on the bluffs in The Highlands. While being here, the reader has to worry all along where is The Scorpion? All together, a wonderfully entertaining thriller that targets the reader's soul.