Cold Fire (Circle Opens Series #3)

Cold Fire (Circle Opens Series #3)

by Tamora Pierce

Paperback(Reprint)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780590396561
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date: 03/01/2003
Series: Circle Opens Series , #3
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 209,723
Product dimensions: 4.16(w) x 6.80(h) x 1.05(d)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Tamora Pierce is the critically acclaimed author of more than twenty novels, including the Circle of Magic and The Circle Opens quartets, THE WILL OF THE EMPRESS, MELTING STONES, and, most recently, the NEW YORK TIMES bestselling Beka Cooper trilogy. She lives in New York State with her husband, Tim, and her seven cats and two birds. Visit her online at www.tamorapierce.com.

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Cold Fire (Circle Opens Series #3) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 75 reviews.
chibimajo on LibraryThing 10 months ago
This is the most creepy and twisted Pierce book I've read so far. Daja and Frostpine are in the cold, cold north, where most of the houses are built from wood. Daja finds magic in the twin daughters of the family they're staying with and must teach them how to meditate and find teachers for them in town. She also befriends a local, Ben, who is teaching about firefighting in their country. But he's also a twisted, diseased man who is deliberately setting fires to teach his townsfolk the importance of his techniques. Didn't realize Tamora could write like that. Compelling.
jjmcgaffey on LibraryThing 10 months ago
This story had been bugging me for a while - I was remembering bits and trying to figure out how they went together. So I reread it. It's just as good as I remembered. Daja learns - well, several new things, but especially that she needs to rein in her judgment - not assume that someone is nice because she likes them. The setting is interesting, too. And this is the only Circle Opens story where the student(s) are largely irrelevant to the plot - neither of them either are the problem or cause it, they're just a (major) side-issue. I don't know why, but I think this is my favorite of the Circle Opens stories.
hoosgracie on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Daja has been traveling with Frostpine and they are spending the winter in Namorn with his friends. When she discovers the twins in the family have magic, she must find them teachers and teach them meditation herself. Meanwhile, because the city is built of wood, fire is a problem. She meets Bennat Ladradun, a local businessman who lost his family in a fire and is now a firefighter. When someone starts setting fires, they work together to stop them.Excellent book in the series.
LisaMaria_C on LibraryThing 10 months ago
I wouldn't start with this book--it's not a standalone. There is a prior quartet, Circle of Magic that introduces four young people who become friends and train together in magic, Sandry, Tris, Briar, and the protagonist of this book, Daja. After that quartet of books, in The Circle Opens series, each goes off into their own, and the order you read those four becomes unimportant. I find Daja and her mentor in this novel appealing, but also the very milleu this story is set in. I had fun guessing if this were set in a quasi-Scandinavia, or if Russia or Holland were the inspiration. I found the look at medieval firefighting (and firebug) also intriguing. The story itself is an interesting character study. The "villain" of this piece is not who or what one might expect and this works as a fine mystery as well as fantasy adventure.
bluesalamanders on LibraryThing 10 months ago
As with most of the Circle books, there are so many plots and sub-plots going on that it's difficult for any of them to get the depth they deserve. In this book, Daja and her teacher Frostpine are visiting a city to the north. Daja discovers the daughters of their hosts have magical abilities, so they need to be taught, so she needs to find teachers for them and teach them meditation. There are lots of fires going on in the city and Daja starts developing a friendship with a man named Ben who set up a fire brigade, and she decides to make living metal gloves for him so he can be more effective in rescuing people. The aforementioned daughters are teaching her to ice skate. Frostpine is investigating counterfeit coins. And so on. Most of the plots overlap or converge at some point, but still it just seems like the book is too short to hold it all. Also, there is a mystery that the reader learns the answer to early in the book and the characters don't discover until near the end. I found that disconcerting and I would have preferred it handled differently.For all its flaws, it's not a bad book, just one I think could have been better. I enjoy it nonetheless; Daja is one of my favorite Circle characters - maybe I relate to her because of the metalsmithing, and also the Circle characters have less of a tendency toward Mary Sueishness than the Tortall women.
librisissimo on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Substance: Excellent depiction of the progression of a hero to mass-murderer. The villain shows far more depth than the heroine.Oddity: Pierce apologizes to PETA-friends who might be offended that the novel's characters wear furs in a pseudo-medieval northern climate. She does not apologize to anyone for executing a rather horrible death penalty.In the other novels of this series, she has no qualms about letting the protagonists decide unilaterally to execute malefactors (nevermind that the villains unquestionably deserve their fates). Seems a tad unbalanced to me.
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Awesome
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I loved all the open and closed books however I felt like this book was all filler and little content. Daja really was down played and written as naive i'm confused with that. I read more about the colors of everyones' underware than the mages. I think she missed a huge opportunity to showcase All four mages equally! Loved 7/8 not bad overall.
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JoMJo More than 1 year ago
This serirs is awesome!
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