The Collected Dialogues of Plato / Edition 1

The Collected Dialogues of Plato / Edition 1

ISBN-10:
0691097186
ISBN-13:
9780691097183
Pub. Date:
10/01/1961
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
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5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As if after reading Plotinus, Augustine and all those Arabian philosophers with those names one can never recall, we needed another commentary on the works of Plato. Cela va de soi (it goes without saying), Plato has been remembered for a reason. Although, there are some philosophers who would consider Plato a mistake (Quine for example, if I remember rightly, refused to teach a class on Plato), I think it would be absurd not to consider Plato at all. There are some dialouges in this book (such as the Timaeus) that will make you yawn, others, like Gorgias, the Symposium and the Laws will make you wide-awake in wonder. But most importantly, these dialouges will introduce you to Socrates. Although, there is no way to ascertain whether it was Plato or Socrates speaking in these dialouges, most assume that in The Apology, The Crito and a few of Plato's other early dialouges, one gets a glimpse of the real Socrates. Socrates, in Plato's (and also Xenophanes) dialouges is a good man, one who will inspire you. He'll teach you the advantages of being open-minded, of realizing human ignorance, and above all, self-knowledge ('know thyself', 'the unexamined life is a life not worth living'). Which, in my opinion, makes Plato worth reading. I would encourage you to read these dialouges and take what you can, and then go on to Aristotle.
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