The Collectibles

The Collectibles

by James J. Kaufman

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780982587300
Publisher: Downstream Publishing
Publication date: 01/04/2011
Pages: 309
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

James J. Kaufman is the author of the award-winning novel The Collectibles and its sequel, The Concealers. Both books draw heavily from his experiences in law, his dealings in the business world, and his interactions with people from widely different backgrounds. Kaufman is an attorney, former judge, and businessman-CEO of the Kaufman Group, Ltd. and chairman of the board of Imaging the World, a nonprofit health care company delivering ultrasound services to Uganda and other underserved populations in an effort to save lives that might otherwise be lost. He is also a proud member of the esteemed Players Club, Gramercy Park, New York City.


Joe Barrett, an actor and Audie Award and Earphones Award-winning narrator, has appeared both on and off Broadway as well as in hundreds of radio and television commercials.

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Collectibles 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
Evangeline_Han More than 1 year ago
30 years ago, Joe Hart started living by the motto "Do what the other fella can't. Be what the other fella ain't". Now, Joe is having a distinguished career as an attorney. But tragedy strikes. 30 years ago, Preston Wilson was rescued from a crevice by Joe. Now, Preston is the owner of one of the largest mega-car dealer company in the country. But he and his company's finances is in serious trouble. Joe is the only attorney who can help Preston out of his financial mess and he agrees to help but on one condition, Preston must promise to fulfill an unspecified request when called upon. The Collectibles is one of the few books I've reviewed so far which contains so many lessons in a single book and it is not glaringly preachy. In the book, the collectibles are Joe's friends who each have personal problems. These people are the nobodys in society. The Collectibles ends on a sad but triumphant note. Two men made a difference in the lives of six people. Since Joe is an attorney and Preston is embroiled in business problems, legal and business lingo was used. As I read the book, I wished there was a glossary explaining the uncommon terms. I had to Google certain terms to find out what they meant. Overall, I found The Collectibles a highly enjoyable and highly intriguing story. There wasn't much suspense in it, but what kept me turning the pages was the method of ingenuity in the plot. Besides that, it was also great fun learning about certain law and business practices!
Sugarpeach on LibraryThing 8 months ago
The Collectibles is one of the few books I¿ve reviewed so far which contains so many lessons in a single book and it is not glaringly preachy. In the book, the collectibles are Joe¿s friends who each have personal problems. These people are the nobodys in society. The Collectibles ends on a sad but triumphant note. Two men made a difference in the lives of six people. Since Joe is an attorney and Preston is embroiled in business problems, legal and business lingo was used. As I read the book, I wished there was a glossary explaining the uncommon terms. I had to Google certain terms to find out what they meant. Overall, I found The Collectibles a highly enjoyable and highly intriguing story. There wasn¿t much suspense in it, but what kept me turning the pages was the method of ingenuity in the plot. Besides that, it was also great fun learning about certain law and business practices!
celticlady53 on LibraryThing 8 months ago
My Thoughts:I won't go into the details of what this book is about because I do not want to rehash the description. But let me just say that this book is awesome!! The book was a pleasure to read and the characters are very likeable. I did get lost a bit in the business part of the story but I found myself learning new things about banking and car dealerships. That said, I found Joe to be such a caring individual who has suffered several losses. These losses make him who he is and his ability to lead and help people (his collectibles, as Joe's wife calls them) makes him a person that people can trust. These "collectibles" that have had the opportunity to know Joe have all become better for it. I had a bit of a problem seeing the pages at the end of the book but I did have my tissues ready. A very emotional but very worthwhile story to read. I highly recommend it.
SuseGordon on LibraryThing 8 months ago
James Kaufman's debut novel, The Collectibles, is a very engaging read as well as bringing us a new promising author. Joe Hart, a former Navy Commander and now a specialized attorney, is really a modern day Knight in Shining Armor. He steps in when other lawyers cannot help a client's business and he does the impossible through mediating, presenting plans of action and communicating honestly. Along the way, Joe has "collected" people in need that through interacting with him, both he and the "collectible" gain personally, not financially, but through the wealth of friendship and sharing. Preston Wilson comes to Joe at a time when Joe needs help. Preston is in need of a financial legal lawyer to rescue him and his company. As Joe helps Preston, he in turn asks Preston to help him with his "collectibles" to the benefit of Preston as a person.This book combined the financial legal world of Auto dealerships with insights into character building as a well-paced interesting read. James Kaufman is off to a nice start!
TheLoopyLibrarian on LibraryThing 8 months ago
What a load of sentimental sticky sweet ooze! I feel a little nauseous from having to digest this book. I had wanted to read it because I thought the premise sounded interesting: one good man asking another to take care of a few people when he no longer could. But when this one good man turns out to be practically perfect and leaves trails of sunflowers wherever he goes, it gets a little maddening. Jesus himself didn¿t perform as many miracles as Joe, the main character. As for the boardroom drama, it felt like the author was on a major ego trip and dragging the reader along. Suffice it to say, I was very bored in the boardroom. The characters were stereotypes. The dialogue was stilted. And the morality tale bonked the reader over the head to the point of causing migraine headaches. I think I¿ll go throw up now.
DomingoSantos on LibraryThing 8 months ago
¿The Collectibles¿ by James J. Kaufman is an otherwise well-crafted and well-written novel that is marred at the end by an instance of a vulgar slang that the author no doubt intended as an utterance of amazement. I understand how the slang can be used as the author intended; however, that intent does not negate how the slang initially impacts the reader in its more common derogatory manner. Because of that impact, the slang seemed jarringly out-of-context, especially given the almost sacred narrative in the several pages that preceded it. In any event, the novel traces a former submarine commander, now an exceptional attorney, and six people upon whose lives he has major impact. The essence of the novel is captured in this snippet of dialogue, ¿He [the attorney] told me that sometimes in life you have to have enough faith to make an irrevocable commitment, and how some people can and some can't...[H]ow it's about personal integrity and who and what you are.¿ ¿The Collectibles¿ is an excellent novel, and certainly five-stars worthy.
koalamom on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Sometimes when you are seeking help from others, it turns out that they help you even more.Joe Hart collected people who needed help, each in his or hr own unique way. When he found out he was dying he brought them together so that they could be there for each other in his place.A very readable story with a sad beginning and ending but also with something very positive going on throughout.I look forward to the author's next novel.
Davidvoz on LibraryThing 8 months ago
"The Collectibles" by James J. Kaufman was a total surprise. As I started reading I was quickly drawn into the story. I was not expecting this book to grab me and not let go. I do not want to say much about this book except if you have a passion to read great books add this to your reading list. I read Spy, Military, and Mystery mostly however Kaufman is now on my reading list. I want to thank James Kaufman, his publisher, and LibraryThing for this great read.
stang50logan on LibraryThing 8 months ago
I must say that I was completely blown away by this book! Probably in the top 5 I have ever read. The book was fast paced and didnt have any slow spots. Very touching book about the wonders of humanity. Sad at the end of the book but was Simply Amazing...Read it!
skstiles612 on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Joe grew up with a strong work ethic taught to him by his uncle. Preston grew up wanting for nothing financially yet no real role model when it came to ethics. As teens these boys crossed paths when Joe saved Preston from drowning. Several years later Joe is once again called on to rescues Preston. Preston¿s greed has brought him to the brink of financial ruin. His advisors call in Joe to help restructure things. Joe agrees under three conditions. Preston must disclose everything, be honest and if Joe calls on him in the future to help he must do so without question. Unbeknownst to Preston, when Joe calls in his favor, Joe has an inoperable brain tumor. He wants Preston to take care of his ¿Collectibles¿. The are other people who for whatever reason have had it tough. Each of them have something to teach Preston. As Preston carries out this task he learns to be more like Joe and a person both he and his wife respects. I enjoyed this book immensely. It makes us look at ourselves which can be painful. These are not just lessons the rich can learn from, but lessons for us all. I will be looking for more from this author.
creighley on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Amazon offered this title for $.99, and I'm glad I didn't pay more! I can't believe that this book won a first book award AND was so highly touted by the readers of librarything. To me the adage: If it's too good to be true; it probably is applies to Joe Hart, pun intended! SNORE! There was absolutely nothing to make the reader think beyond what was written on the pages AND nothing to make the reader think after the pages were read.
MarthaHuntley on LibraryThing 8 months ago
This book is not without its problems -- it's a little slow going at the beginning, and the early focus on business turn-arounds won't be every reader's cup of tea. Also, it is awkwardly written. But the book on the whole is a jewel. It is a wonderful depiction of what a man of integrity looks like, thinks like, and acts like, as he determines to live his life by his uncle's creed, "Do what others won't. Be what others can't. And then help the others." The Collectibles has a lot to say and teach, not just for its characters, but through them to its readers. Highly recommended. In its impact, this book reminded me of the classic In His Steps by Charles Sheldon, first published in 1897 -- also an awkwardly written book, and certainly more hokey than The Collectibles, but a book that struck a chord with a lot of people, selling over 30 million copies, still selling today, the ninth best selling book ever.
abcarroll on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Joe is an excellent attorney eith a heart of gold. When Preston gets in serious financial trouble he enlists Joe to help him save his company...and in doinf so Joe saves much more than that. I really enjoyed this book. Very heartwarming and leaves you with a renewed faith in people.
sdmurphy53 on LibraryThing 8 months ago
I thought this was a very good read. I thought it would be a good book to study in a high school English class possibly because of the style of writing. Also because of the morals it taught. I love the way the book was written and throughly enjoyed the characters and what they each represented, I would suggest this to everyone to read and enjoy.
wakela on LibraryThing 8 months ago
James J. Kaufman may be new on the literary scene, but he writes like a pro. This work of art is crafted so seamlessly and effortlessly that you feel drawn into it immediately and completely forget the world around you. Joe Hart¿s life growing up wasn¿t always easy. His aunt tried to smooth things over for him though after his parents died. The death of parents while you are young is difficult to deal with. A person can either us that experience to make themselves better or to just give up and let the experience crash over them. On the other side of the coin, you have Preston Wilson who grew up in a rich, prestigious family. He has never wanted for anything except maybe love, but since that doesn¿t have a monetary value it isn¿t worth anything. The bigger the price tag, the more desirable the object. They have a chance meeting one summer when they were teenagers. Neither gave the other one a thought until 30 years later when Joe gets a call from Preston¿s advisors that he needs his help.Joe will help if his three conditions are met. The first one is that Preston needs to be completely honest. The second one is Preston must disclose everything about the situation. And the third is that Joe will call in a favor of Preston and Preston must do it. So even though they do not know at that time what the third favor is, they agree.When Joe finally does drop the bomb of what the favor is, Preston of course rebels against it. Joe wants him to take care of his ¿Collectibles¿. Now these aren¿t some knick knacks that sit on shelves like most people have. No. These ¿collectibles¿ are people who are in dire situations that Joe has been trying to help.Helping out these people, Preston learns that there is a decent and caring person buried inside of him that has been wanting out. This story has truly touched my heart. I know that it will be one that I read over and over again. Look out literary world, there is a great new author on the scene! And he is going to go far!In conjunction with the Wakela's World Disclosure Statement, I received a product in order to enable my review. No other compensation has been received. My statements are an honest account of my experience with the brand. The opinions stated here are mine alone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book should be a "Must read" for all of us. Judge Kaufman has managed to pack a lifetime of life learning experiences within the pages of this wonderful novel. Highly recommended. J M Lydon ust" for all of us. There are so many life lessons for each of us that are contained
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
i thourghly enjoyed this book, found it hard to put down
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SheilaDeeth More than 1 year ago
Have you ever thought that lawyers are more concerned about how much money they make than how much good they do? If you have, The Collectibles by former judge, James J. Kaufman, won't change your opinion, but it just might modify it to allow for some lawyers being honest, determined and wise. Joe Hart, an orphan from the Adirondack mountains, turned Navy commander, turned distinguished attorney, is just such a one, though his life seems to fall apart under tragic circumstances, sending him running to his past. Meanwhile Preston Wilson is the privileged rich kid grown up, desperate to succeed and suddenly staring at the face of financial and emotional ruin. Preston needs Joe, and Joe doesn't want to be needed. The author creates a pleasingly evocative picture of the mountains where Joe grew up and is eventually found, then brings the story back to big-city America, big-fee lawyers, banks, foreclosures and loans. Joe turns out to be more than a briefly sketched childhood and tragic victim of circumstance. Previous acquaintances call with hopes and needs and he comes to their aid. For no clear reason, except a remembrance of his uncle's injunction to "help the other fella" and a memory of truths as tall as mountains, Joe seems to have impacted many troubled lives. But Preston has no real desire to meet these losers till Joe calls in an unconventional IOU and begins to reveal his "collectibles." At 308 pages, The Collectibles felt like a long read. But Preston's discoveries in the final third make a real emotional impact and redeem any slowness in the tale. Perhaps, if more of us tried to "help the other fella," more collectibles would find the truth of mountains, and more lawyers might have more good deeds to their names. This was certainly an enjoyable read, informative in its view of banks and lawyers, and pleasing in its invitation to look at the choices we make through the choices made by others. Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from Rebecca at the Cadence Marketing Group in exchange for an honest review.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
aenewtonian More than 1 year ago
I had so much fun reading this book - the characters were compelling, sad, beautiful and sometimes hilarious. The business/legal aspects were captivating to read about. I'm really looking forward to Kaufman's next book!