Comanche Woman (Sisters of the Lone Star Series #2)

Comanche Woman (Sisters of the Lone Star Series #2)

by Joan Johnston
4.1 28

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Comanche Woman (Sisters of the Lone Star Series #2) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 28 reviews.
Sparky_Patches More than 1 year ago
Overall Rating: 4.75: Action: 3.75 / Emotion: 5.0 / Romance: 5.0 / Sensuous: 2.0 / Suspense: 2.5 // Historical Flavor: 4.5 // Laughter: 1 // Teary: 3 / Tears: 5 Comanche Woman: 4.75: Since Joan Johnston is a favorite author, it was not surprising that this exciting, entertaining, deeply emotional, well-told story was un-put-down-able.  The best book in The Sisters of The Lone Star Trilogy. Hero: 4.75: Long Quiet / Walker Coburn: A well-named hero.  This handsome hero walked tall, full of integrity and knew who he was in spite of having the blood of two nationalities running in his veins.  Long Quiet is a hero that would melt any woman's heart -- he endlessly pursued the woman he loved. Heroine: 4.50: Bayleigh "Bay" Falkirk Stewart: A beautiful, kind-hearted, sweet-natured heroine that struggled to find her place in a rough and tumble world.  It was easy to feel compassion for and anger at Bay and then cheer her on as she struggled to find her place in the world. Story Line: 4.50: The story line was engaging and intriguing and kept readers glued to the book to see how {1} a half-white, half-Comanche man eventually found his way from the tribe that he loved to the woman he loved, and {2} a gentle-natured beauty made a connection to the family from which she felt distant. Action: 3.75: Enough action scenes, highlighting Long Quiet's masculine skills, kept the story interesting for readers who like a little adventure in their books. Emotion: 5.00: Johnston used Long Quiet's angst about his heritage to tie readers to him on a deeply emotional level.  It was also easy to establish an emotional connection to Bay because of her feelings about not fitting into a family containing an overpowering father and two outspoken sisters. Romance: 5.00: The aura of romance permeated the entire story.  Long Quiet had been in love with Bay for years . . . and then Bay found herself falling for Long Quiet, a man who courted her and showed kindnesses that were entirely inappropriate for his culture. Suspense: 2.50: Johnston kept readers in a continual state of edginess.  First, wondering how Long Quiet was going to rescue Bay from the Comanche village and then how he was going to save her from marrying Jonas. Sensuous: 2.00: Johnston did a great job of slipping in some old-fashioned (1980s), very emotional, sensual love scenes that had a bit of sizzle when Long Quiet finally took Bay to his bed. Historical Flavor: 4.50: Johnson does an excellent job of including details about Texas history in the story as she addresses the issues the Texans faced as they warred with the Mexicans and Comanche. Secondary Characters: 5.00: One thing that Johnston does with great skill is to introduce secondary characters, who are important to the plot of the book, and sometimes play minor roles, but when they walk through the pages of the book, they leap out at you.  This book featured: {1} Rip Stewart, {2} Sloan Stewart, {3} Luke Summers, {4} Many Horses, {5} He Decides It, {6} Little Deer, {7} Jonas Harper, {8} Cruz Guerrero, and {9} Francisco "Cisco" Guerrero. A more in-depth, detailed, spoiler-ridden review of *Comanche Woman* appears at Wolf Bear Does Books.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
My first and greatest complaint about this novel is the writer's poor research. Fans of historical fiction tend to be quite knowledgeable about their favorite period and this novel is full of mistakes about the culture it depicts. The author should have interviewed some real Numu (Comanche) people about their culture and the Numu (Comanche) language. The only word Johnston got right was Pia (mother). Others are misspelled or just COMPLETELY wrong - for example, Long Quiet proposes to Bay and asks her to become his Paraiboo, which is the Numu (Comanche) word for chief, not wife! Wife is kwuhu, not even close! Bay's easy abandonment of her foster daughter, which a Comanche mother would never do, is appalling. Comanche medicine men also did not have as much authority as was depicted here. If one is going to write about American Indians one should make an effort for accuracy. Anything else is just plain exploitive to the culture and heritage. As for the romance - Bayleigh and Long Quiet had the potential for a great love story, but they did too many improbable things and their passion was unconvincing. Some characters are impossible to like, especially Bay's father Rip. The author attempts to convince the reader that underneath the crust, he's really a loving father, but it doesn't wash. He sets impossible standards and is, frankly, a CHILD ABUSER. I kept hoping somebody would off him in a justifiably gruesome manner. Long Quiet spends YEARS secretly loving Bayleigh and seizes the chance to claim her, even insisting that she share his bed, then inexplicably dumps her. After all these years searching for her, he doesn't even bother to see her safely home - he abandons her on the road! They finally get together, but in a stereotypical shotgun wedding and he thinks she only wants his money. The last straw for me was naming their son Whipp - a dumb name at best and horridly insensitive since his wife is forever scarred from abuse as a captive! If ever a child's name conjured negative images.... I wanted to like this series, but found it anything but truly romantic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had never read Joan Johnston before but after reading this book,I will definitely read more.The love story between Bay and Long Quiet is beautiful.You root for them to be together.