Come and Gone

Come and Gone

by Joe Parkin

Paperback

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Overview

After Five Years of Busting My Ass in the Belgian gutters, I said goodbye to Flanders knowing that I might never go back. I never did.

I flew back to the U.S. with empty pockets and no contract. For several years, I was unable to watch a Belgian spring classic without a lump in my throat. I died a little bit watching my teammates in the Tour de France in 1992.

Eventually I landed a spot with the Coors Light team. After the years in Europe, though, racing in the U.S. didn't really do it for me. I was never able to rise to the level of dedication I had mustered each day in Europe.

Until I started racing mountain bikes.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781934030547
Publisher: VeloPress
Publication date: 04/01/2010
Pages: 208
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Joe Parkin has been an airplane pilot, sharpshooter, and professional cyclist. He represented the United States at the World Cycling and Cyclocross Championships. Come and Gone is the follow-up story to his previous novel A Dog in a Hat. He lives in Santa Cruz, CA and is the editor of BIKE and Paved magazines.

Table of Contents

1 Citizen Foreigner 1

2 Philadelphia Flyer 25

3 Silver Bullet 51

4 Texas Broom Wagon 69

5 Paydirt 83

6 Cyclocrossed 97

7 Olympic Dreams 105

8 Chequamegon 131

9 Ooooh, Barracuda 139

10 Come & Gone 163

Epilogue 173

Team History 175

Acknowledgments 177

About the Author 179

Interviews

Joe Parkin lives and rides in Santa Cruz, CA.

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Come and Gone 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
MikeHardy on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is good for a die-hard racer on the US scene. It covers the the period in time I was just getting into racing, so for me it is a bit nostalgic. I think his previous book was better though - it seemed more introspective and hopeful somehow where this book often times seemed negative and the mood seemed to trace the denouement of the career it was chronicling