×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Come Hell or High Water: Hurricane Katrina and the Color of Disaster
     

Come Hell or High Water: Hurricane Katrina and the Color of Disaster

5.0 1
by Michael Eric Dyson
 
When Hurricane Katrina tore through New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, hundreds of thousands were left behind to suffer the ravages of destruction, disease, and even death. The majority of these people were black; nearly all were poor. Displaying the intellectual rigor, political passion, and personal empathy that have won him acclaim and fans all across the color line,

Overview

When Hurricane Katrina tore through New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, hundreds of thousands were left behind to suffer the ravages of destruction, disease, and even death. The majority of these people were black; nearly all were poor. Displaying the intellectual rigor, political passion, and personal empathy that have won him acclaim and fans all across the color line, Michael Eric Dyson offers a searing assessment of the meaning of Hurricane Katrina. With this clarion call Dyson warns us that we can only find redemption as a society if we acknowledge that Katrina was more than an engineering or emergency response failure. What's at stake is no less than the future of democracy.

About the Author:
Michael Eric Dyson is University Professor at Georgetown University

Editorial Reviews

When Hurricane Katrina thrashed across the Southeast in August 2005, its tempestuous winds and uncontrolled flooding left over 1,800 people dead and caused more than $81 billion in damage. But, according to African-American scholar Michael Eric Dyson, this unprecedented disaster also left something else in shreds: American myths of race and class. Dyson's Come Hell or High Water examines the high human cost of government policies heavily weighted against the poor and the disenfranchised. Combining interviews and analysis, the controversial author of Is Bill Cosby Right? discusses how seldom-articulated concepts of inequality play out in real-world disasters like Katrina.
Publishers Weekly
The first major book to be released about Hurricane Katrina, Dyson's volume not only chronicles what happened when, it also argues that the nation's failure to offer timely aid to Katrina's victims indicates deeper problems in race and class relations. Dyson's time lines will surely be disputed, his indictments of specific New Orleans failures defended or whitewashed. But these points are secondary. More important are the larger questions Dyson (Between God and Gangsta Rap, etc.) poses, such as "What do politicians sold on the idea of limited governance offer to folk who need, and deserve, the government to come to their aid?" "Does George Bush care about black people?" and "Do well-off black people care about poor black people?" With its abundance of buzz-worthy coinages, like "Aframnesia" and "Afristocracy," Dyson's populist style sometimes gets too cute. But his contention that Katrina exposed a dominant culture pervaded not only by "active malice" toward poor blacks but also by a long history of "passive indifference" to their problems is both powerful and unsettling. Through this history of neglect, Dyson suggests, America has broken its social contract with poor blacks who, since Emancipation, have assumed that government will protect all its citizens. Yet when disaster struck the poor, the cavalry arrived four days late. (Jan. 16) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780465017614
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication date:
12/28/2005
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.69(d)
Age Range:
13 - 18 Years

Meet the Author


Michael Eric Dyson, named by Ebony as one of the hundred most influential black Americans, is the author of sixteen books, including Holler if You Hear Me, Is Bill Cosby Right? and I May Not Get There With You: The True Martin Luther King Jr. He is currently University Professor of Sociology at Georgetown University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Come Hell or High Water: Hurricane Katrina and the Color of Disaster 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Katrina Disaster was unfortunate, yet our nation's response was a disaster. I'm happy someone decided to document this to search behind the scenes about the 'lack of care and attention' our African-Americans received. Thank you Michael Eric Dyson.