Commentary on the Psalms, Volume I: 1-41

Commentary on the Psalms, Volume I: 1-41

by Allen Ross

Hardcover

$49.99

Overview

For thousands of years, the Book of Psalms has been one of God's people's richest resources for expression of worship and development of the spiritual life. At the same time it is one of the more complex and challenging sections of the Bible for expositors. Pastors, teachers, and all serious students of the Bible will find this commentary invaluable for developing their understanding of the Psalms and for improving their ability to expound it with precision and depth.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780825425622
Publisher: Kregel Publications
Publication date: 02/09/2012
Series: Kregel Exegetical Library Series
Pages: 894
Product dimensions: 6.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 2.00(d)

About the Author

Allen P. Ross (PhD, University of Cambridge) is professor of divinity at Beeson Divinity School. Prior to this, he taught at Trinity Episcopal School of Ministry and Dallas Theological Seminary. His publications include Creation and Blessing: A Guide to the Study and Exposition of Genesis, Holiness to the Lord: A Guide to the Exposition of the Book of Leviticus, and Introducing Biblical Hebrew.

Table of Contents

Preface 11

Abbreviations 19

Value of the Psalms 25

Text and Ancient Versions of the Psalms 31

Titles and Headings of the Psalms 39

History of the Interpretation of the Psalms 65

Interpreting Biblical Poetry 81

Literary Forms and Functions in the Psalms 111

Psalms in Worship 147

Theology of the Psalms 155

Exposition of the Psalms 169

Psalm 1 The Life That Is Blessed 181

Psalm 2 The Coronation of God's Son 197

Psalm 3 Confidence in the Face of Adversity 215

Psalm 4 Safe and Secure in God's Love in Spite of False Accusations 229

Psalm 5 Deliverance from Dangerous Deception 241

Psalm 6 A Prayer for Deliverance from Severe Chastening 257

Psalm 7 An Appeal of the Innocent Before the Righteous Judge 273

Psalm 8 Glory Condescending to Mankind 287

Psalm 9 Confident Praise for Vindication 299

Psalm 10 The Oppression of the Helless 315

Psalm 11 Holding Fast to the Faith 335

Psalm 12 Truth in a World of Deception 349

Psalm 13 The Cry of the Afflicted 361

Psalm 14 The Folly and the Future of the Fool 371

Psalm 15 Qualifications of Worshipers 385

Psalm 16 The Lord's Everlasting Provision and Protection 397

Psalm 17 Vindication and Protection for the Righteous 415

Psalm 18 A Royal Thanksgiving for Divine Intervention in Battle 433

Psalm 19 The Design of Divine Revelation 465

Psalm 20 Confidence in the Name of the Lord 489

Psalm 21 The Triumph of the Lord's Anointed 507

Psalm 22 Afflicted by the Wicked, Abandoned by God?A Cry of Despair 521

Psalm 23 The Faithful Provisions of the Lord 553

Psalm 24 Preparation to Praise the King of Glory 573

Psalm 25 The Way of the Lord?Forgiveness, Deliverance, and Guidance 591

Psalm 26 Separation from Sinners 607

Psalm 27 A Prayer Song of Courageous Trust 621

Psalm 28 A Confident Cry for Deliverance from the Wicked and Their Destiny 637

Psalm 29 The Powerful "Voice" of the Lord 651

Psalm 30 A Moment in His Anger?A Lifetime in His Favor 663

Psalm 31 Trust in the Time of Trouble 681

Psalm 32 The Joy of Forgiveness 703

Psalm 33 A New Song of Praise for His Word and His Faithfulness, His Righteousness, and His Love 721

Psalm 34 Edifying Praise for the Goodness of God 743

Psalm 35 Hated Without a Cause 759

Psalm 36 God's Preserving, Fulfilling Love 779

Psalm 37 The Righteousness of Divine Providence 797

Psalm 38 Prayer of a Sick Man Suffering Because of Sin 819

Psalm 39 The Prayer of a Desperately Sick Man 837

Psalm 40 The Song of Sacrificial Service 853

Psalm 41 Encouragement for Help Against Treachery 873

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Commentary on the Psalms, Volume I: 1-41 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
ScriptureZealot More than 1 year ago
I am a lay person who is a 'serious student of the Bible'. I read the exposition of Genesis by Ross entitled Creation and Blessing and became a fan of him and his style. That exposition was perfect for me and my level of development as is this commentary/exposition of the Psalms. According to Ross it's &quot;for pastors, teachers and all serious students of the Bible.&quot; This commentary isn't quite as academic as Goldingay's, but is very beefy and didn't leave me wanting at all. In fact, he answers questions I didn't know I had. It would be a little much for a new Christian, especially the introduction. At nearly 900 pages for volume 1 of 3, it may also look a little intimidating. I find introductions to commentaries extremely helpful. This one is fairly long and <em>extremely</em> informative, and even motivating. One of the most 'valuable' parts of the Introduction is The Value of the Psalms. He quotes quite a few people from different time periods, including Calvin, and writes about the importance of the Psalms, how this importance used to be realized, and how the church in general has lost the value and stopped using the Psalms as a model for prayer and use in worship, beyond a cursory reading here and there. This has inspired me to spend more time with the Psalms and this is the type of commentary that can be used in sort of a devotional way, for lack of a better term. There are quite a few subjects dealt with using just the right amount of words, a few of them being Literary Forms, Theology of the Psalms and a guide to Exposition of the Psalms should you want to tackle one yourself if you're not up to that level. Ross is experienced in teaching the exposition of the Psalms in the seminary classroom and expounding them in churches, and has gained a good sense of what needs to be explained in a concise way, which I think shows in this commentary. As opposed to taking a verse or line from a Psalm for a message (or plaque?) Ross says, &quot;the exposition should cover the entire psalm, and that it should not only explain the text verse-by-verse but also show how the message of the psalm unfolds section-by-section. After all, a psalm is a piece of literature and therefore has a unified theme and a progression of thoughts developing that theme.&quot; He has &quot;not included views down the history of interpretation&quot; but mainly sticks to his own exposition except for various quotes from others used sparingly. This is definitely not a 'commentary on commentaries'. Some Hebrew words are shown and explained. There are no transliterations, which aren't helpful anyway. For those who don't know the language, he describes the words in a pretty understandable way. Footnotes deal further with Hebrew, Greek (Septuagint) and various English translations. Each Psalm has his own fairly literal/formal translation along with textual variant issues dealt with in the footnotes. Then Composition and Context, Exegetical Analysis (an outline), Commentary in Expository Form, and Message and Application. He seems to answer most or all of my questions as mentioned before. Ross explains many of the terms, phrases and Hebrew idioms that people like me can learn from. For pastors it can help in wording explanations. In Psalm 13 for example, Ross explains why it is a lament, how the text shows that the trouble is ongoing, what the significance of an asposiopesis is, and explains what 'remember' means in this context. I have been given a copy of the book by Kregel Publications for an unbiased review. I'm afraid I sound like it's not very unbiased because the review is all so positive. The only possible negative thing I can find at this point is the typeface is a little on the large size for me. A bit smaller and the book wouldn't be so large and wouldn't have as much of a &quot;rudimentary&quot; look, because it's not. The quality of the paper is very good and the cover design bound to the hard cover (no need for a silly dust jacket) is very classy. I think this commentary would be valuable for nearly anyone. I would only rule out new Christians as mentioned before because they might get lost with many of the theological terms and subjects, especially in the introduction, even though it isn't at a high academic or technical level. For those who are motivated though, I'm sure they would benefit in some way and it would be a good investment for the future. Ross mentions that volume 3 will have a bibliography and writes about how important it is to have more than one source and emphasized that this isn't the only commentary one should own. If I can afford it, I plan on acquiring the other volumes if and when they come out, maybe by the time you read this.
bobhayton on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Very few commentaries can function as a single comprehensive resource for the Biblical passage at hand. The wise expositor makes use of theological introductions, critical comments on the Greek or Hebrew, a good exegetical commentary and then a few devotional commentaries ¿ of course he also makes his own personal study of the passage.What Allen P. Ross does for us in his new book, "A Commentary on the Psalms: volume 1" (Kregel, 2012), is distill the insights of decades of research and study on the book of Psalms into a single tool that can truly be a one-stop-shop for the busy pastor.Ross provides 180 pages of introduction to the book of Psalms, focusing on structure and theology. He then gives us more than 700 pages of commentary on just the first 41 psalms. Each psalm is covered separately, the text is provided with an eye for meaningful textual variants (which are discussed at some length). The psalm¿s composition and context is then briefly sketched and an exegetical analysis is provided. Then comes a detailed commentary focusing on exposition, and all this is wrapped up with a brief recounting of the message and application of the psalm.Ross aims to help modern preachers and teachers to truly exposit all of the psalms in their entirety (not just a line here and there). He blends contemporary insights with gems of yesterday as he analyzes the Psalms and provides a very useful tool for the modern preacher. Ross with help from the team at Kregel, has crafted his tool to be most user-friendly. The font is large, there are helpful charts and diagrams, and clear section headings which break up the massive book. He uses footnotes throughout for more technical discussions, but chooses not to provide Hebrew transliterations as a rule, preferring just English translations and the Hebrew words themselves.When we have his entire three volume commentary (at least from reading the introductory material it appears this will be three volumes), we will truly have a single and comprehensive resource for what may be the most important book in all of Scripture. His approach is to stick to the text but not to shy away from reading the text in light of the context of the NT revelation as well (at a later stage in the interpretation). Even if in some respects one differs with Ross, he will still find Ross¿s book immensely helpful.Ross shows how vital the Psalms were both for Hebrew worship and that of the early church. Even in the Reformer¿s era, intimate knowledge of the psalter was a prerequisite for anyone aiming to take up a pastorate. How far we have fallen from an age where psalms made up the bulk of corporate worship. May Ross¿s work help revive a study and interest in the Psalms today.Disclaimer: This book was provided by Kregel Publications. I was under no obligation to offer a favorable review.
rjhayton More than 1 year ago
Very few commentaries can function as a single comprehensive resource for the Biblical passage at hand. The wise expositor makes use of theological introductions, critical comments on the Greek or Hebrew, a good exegetical commentary and then a few devotional commentaries &ndash; of course he also makes his own personal study of the passage. What Allen P. Ross does for us in his new book, &quot;A Commentary on the Psalms: volume 1&quot; (Kregel, 2012), is distill the insights of decades of research and study on the book of Psalms into a single tool that can truly be a one-stop-shop for the busy pastor. Ross provides 180 pages of introduction to the book of Psalms, focusing on structure and theology. He then gives us more than 700 pages of commentary on just the first 41 psalms. Each psalm is covered separately, the text is provided with an eye for meaningful textual variants (which are discussed at some length). The psalm&rsquo;s composition and context is then briefly sketched and an exegetical analysis is provided. Then comes a detailed commentary focusing on exposition, and all this is wrapped up with a brief recounting of the message and application of the psalm. Ross aims to help modern preachers and teachers to truly exposit all of the psalms in their entirety (not just a line here and there). He blends contemporary insights with gems of yesterday as he analyzes the Psalms and provides a very useful tool for the modern preacher. Ross with help from the team at Kregel, has crafted his tool to be most user-friendly. The font is large, there are helpful charts and diagrams, and clear section headings which break up the massive book. He uses footnotes throughout for more technical discussions, but chooses not to provide Hebrew transliterations as a rule, preferring just English translations and the Hebrew words themselves. When we have his entire three volume commentary (at least from reading the introductory material it appears this will be three volumes), we will truly have a single and comprehensive resource for what may be the most important book in all of Scripture. His approach is to stick to the text but not to shy away from reading the text in light of the context of the NT revelation as well (at a later stage in the interpretation). Even if in some respects one differs with Ross, he will still find Ross&rsquo;s book immensely helpful. Ross shows how vital the Psalms were both for Hebrew worship and that of the early church. Even in the Reformer&rsquo;s era, intimate knowledge of the psalter was a prerequisite for anyone aiming to take up a pastorate. How far we have fallen from an age where psalms made up the bulk of corporate worship. May Ross&rsquo;s work help revive a study and interest in the Psalms today. Disclaimer: This book was provided by Kregel Publications. I was under no obligation to offer a favorable review.
JasonG79 More than 1 year ago
Ross&rsquo;s introductory section (180 pages!) covers some of the typical issues (date, authorship, provenance, etc.) encountered in most commentaries, but he doesn&rsquo;t devote whole sections to them. He instead intersperses discussion of these issues throughout the commentary itself as he finds them relevant. His attention then is paid to matters that are more particular to the psalter: abbreviations, the psalms&rsquo; value, the text and versions of the psalms, and titles and headings. Reading through these chapters shows the reader the psalms&rsquo; truly variegated nature. Following these chapters, Ross attends to other matters that are more broadly applicable, but important for understanding the psalms. These chapters cover the history of interpretation (which shows quite a diversity of approaches), biblical poetry (a notoriously untamable beast!), literary forms and functions in the psalms, theology of the psalms, and an exposition of the psalms. I won&rsquo;t deal with these sections except to say they are helpful in equipping the reader with the appropriate tools necessary to begin the interpretive process in the psalter. Perhaps the most commendable aspect of this commentary is its accessibility, a goal that many commentators either eschew or miss altogether. To benefit from Ross&rsquo; commentary one need not have advanced knowledge of Hebrew to work through the exegetical discussions. However, some facility in Hebrew will be beneficial, perhaps even necessary, to fully benefit from Ross&rsquo;s work. Ross, whom I know primarily through his introductory Hebrew grammar, offers plenty in the way of grammatical analysis and categorization of usage. While for me this is helpful, it may not be to some, only because some of the categories require minor explanations (which are standard fare in Hebrew grammars). In fact, it&rsquo;s the one element that stands out about this volume in comparison to other commentaries on the same level, which is why I say some facility in Hebrew will help gain the fullest benefit from the commentary (just keep Ross&rsquo;s grammar handy and you&rsquo;re good to go!). Another feature that I appreciate is the absence of transliterations. I am no fan of them so I was glad to see that Ross does not employ it, but rather puts terms/phrases being discussed in quotes as a translation and provides the Hebrew in parentheses. I also appreciate the relegation of more technical discussion to the footnotes (and by implication the absence of endnotes!), which of course is the whole purpose of footnotes, thereby providing opportunities for deeper study for those interested. You might think that a commentary that addresses 41 psalms in just over 700 pages (for the commentary proper) would be verbose, but not so. Part of this is due to the length of some of the psalms themselves and part is due to Ross&rsquo;s extensive footnoting (as previously mentioned), but in general he provides rather concise discussion for each psalm. Ross&rsquo;s style is easily read and never comes across as pedantic and that makes this particular volume quite handy. Again, this series is not going to be as helpful to some (those whose own scholarly pursuits intersect with the material presented), but there is more than enough insight and exposition to benefit the vast majority of those for whom it was written. I would recommend this volume to any who are studying the psalms, but especially for those whose training in Hebrew and OT is/has been minimal.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Uniquely_His More than 1 year ago
For thousands of years, the Book of Psalms has been one of God's people's richest resources for expression of worship and development of the spiritual life. At the same time it is one of the more complex and challenging sections of the Bible for expositors. Pastors, teachers, and all serious students of the Bible will find this commentary invaluable for developing their understanding of the Psalms and for improving their ability to expound it with precision and depth. For each psalm, Dr. Allen Ross guides the reader through a detailed exegetical outline, proposes a homiletical outline, and offers a summary expository idea of the message of the whole psalm. The commentary includes discussion throughout of three primary challenges to understanding the Psalms: Textual issues: Every major textual difficulty is addressed in order to help the expositor understand the interpretive issues and make decisions when there are multiple available readings. Poetic language: The Psalms are full of poetic imagery, devices and structures. Ross discusses this &quot;language&quot; of Hebrew poetry in its context with each psalm, specifying the precise devices being used and how they work in the psalm. The Psalms' Hebrew grammar and syntax pose a challenge to many expositors, whether they are familiar with Hebrew or not. This commentary illuminates Hebrew constructions word meanings in a way that is helpful both to readers who are comfortable with Hebrew and those who are not. I was very excited to receive this commentary from Kregel Publications for reviewing purposes. Why? you may ask. I love the Psalms, as I am sure most people do. I also have many commentaries on the Psalms and I wanted to read one that really would help me better understand them. I was not disappointed with this commentary. Ross begins this commentary on the first 41 Psalms by explaining the Value of the Psalms (beginning on page 25) and then flows into Text and Ancient Versions of the Psalms, Titles and Headings of the Psalms, History of the Interpretation of the Psalms, Interpreting Biblical Poetry, Literary Forms and Functions in the Psalms, Psalms in Worship, Theology of the Psalms, and Exposition of the Psalms. This may seem like a lot of extra reading or you may not think you need this background information, but it is important to read these sections first, especially if you have never really studied the Psalms. It's easy to read and very helpful once you get into the Psalms, themselves. Heading straight to my favorite psalm, Psalm 23 (of course), I found the Text and Textual Variants informative and that they gave me a better understanding of the psalm. From this starting position, Ross took me through the Composition and Context to the Exegetical Analysis then to the meat or perhaps to us students of the Psalms, the dessert, his Commentary in Expository Form. Well written in an easy to read format, Ross provides the perfect commentary for anyone who desires to better understand the Psalms. I would say this commentary would be a cherished edition to any bible student's library, whether they are just starting to study the Psalms or a theologian. I know I will put this one next to my copy of The Treasury of David. Many thanks to Kregel Publications for freely providing me with this review copy. It was a pleasure to review and read such an excellent commentary. I look forward to reading more of Allen Ross's work.