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The composition of technical papers
     

The composition of technical papers

by Homer Andrew Watt
 

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This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.

Overview

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940017012550
Publisher:
New York, McGraw-Hill book company, inc.; [etc., etc. ]
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
802 KB

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER II FUNDAMENTAL PROBLEMS AND SUGGESTIONS Getting The Reader's Point or View Writing is a process of transferring to others by means of visible symbols ideas which exist originally in our own minds. It is one means of expression, of transmission of thought. Speech, which is another means of expression, is at best an imperfect medium for conveying ideas; and writing, deficient in those auxiliary devices of intonation, facial expression, and gesticulation which speech possesses, is even more imperfect. The ideas of the average man are very likely to be badly jumbled; his brain has a curiously perverse trick of skipping from one detail of a subject to another in a most irregular manner, and only the most strenuous efforts at mental concentration will bring order out of chaos. But even when the writer has finally succeeded in getting his mind to thinking clearly and connectedly, he has made only the initial step; there still remains the writing, the translation of the ideas into the written symbols which are to stand for them. And here a thousand pitfalls yawn for him. He may carelessly separate ideas which belong together; he may over-emphasize an unimportant idea by giving it too important a form or too emphatic a position, or he may under-emphasize a really important thought by subordinating it in construction or in position; he may select a word which does not at all conveythe idea which he intended it to carry; he may even by an incorrect construction obscure the meaning of his idea entirely or in some cases give a thought exactly the opposite of that which he had in mind. A knowledge of the errors in expression which result in the reader's misunderstanding, and thenconstant vigilance in guarding against these errors is the price of clear, effective writing. The m...

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