Computational Models of Visual Processing

Computational Models of Visual Processing

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Overview

The more than twenty contributions in this book, all new and previously unpublished, provide an up-to-date survey of contemporary research on computational modeling of the visual system. The approaches represented range from neurophysiology to psychophysics, and from retinal function to the analysis of visual cues to motion, color, texture, and depth. The contributions are linked thematically by a consistent consideration of the links between empirical data and computational models in the study of visual function.

An introductory chapter by Edward Adelson and James Bergen gives a new and elegant formalization of the elements of early vision. Subsequent sections treat receptors and sampling, models of neural function, detection and discrimination, color and shading, motion and texture, and 3D shape. Each section is introduced by a brief topical review and summary.

Contributors
Edward H. Adelson, Albert J. Ahumada, Jr., James R. Bergen, David G. Birch, David H. Brainard, Heinrich H. Bülthoff, Charles Chubb, Nancy J. Coletta, Michael D'Zmura, John P. Frisby, Norma Graham, Norberto M. Grzywacz, P. William Haake, Michael J. Hawken, David J. Heeger, Donald C. Hood, Elizabeth B. Johnston, Daniel Kersten, Michael S. Landy, Peter Lennie, J. Stephen Mansfield, J. Anthony Movshon, Jacob Nachmias, Andrew J. Parker, Denis G. Pelli, Stephen B. Pollard, R. Clay Reid, Robert Shapley, Carlo L. M. Tiana, Brian A. Wandell, Andrew B. Watson, David R. Williams, Hugh R. Wilson, Yuede. Yang, Alan L. Yuille

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780262527989
Publisher: MIT Press
Publication date: 10/24/1991
Series: MIT Press Series
Pages: 406
Product dimensions: 8.70(w) x 10.10(h) x 1.40(d)

About the Author


Michael S. Landy is Associate Professor of Psychology at New York University.


J. Anthony Movshon is Professor of Neural Science and Psychology and Director of the Center for Neural Science.

Table of Contents

Preface
Contributors
Part I The Task of Vision
1 The Plenoptic Function and the Elements of
Early Vision
Edward H. Adelson and James R. Bergen
Part II Receptors and Sampling
2 Learning Receptor Positions
Albert J. Ahumada, Jr.
3 A Model of Aliasing in EXtrafoveal Human Vision
Carlo L. M. Tiana, David R. Williams, Nancy J. Coletta, and
P. William Haake
4 Models of Human Rod Receptors and the ERG
Donald C. Hood and David G. Birch
Part III Models of Neural Function
5 The Design of Chromatically Opponent Receptive
Fields
Peter Lennie, P. William Haake, and David R. Williams
6 Spatial Receptive Field Organization in Monkey V1
and its Relationship to the Cone Mosaic
Michael J. Hawken and Andrew J. Parker
7 Neural Contrast Sensitivity
Andrew B. Watson
8 Spatiotemporal Receptive Fields and Direction
Selectivity
Robert Shapley, R. Clay Reid, and Robert Soodak
9 Nonlinear Model of Neural Responses in Cat Visual
CorteX
David J. Heeger
Part IV Detection and Discrimination
10 A Template Matching Model of Subthreshold
Summation
Jacob Nachmias
11 Noise in the Visual System May Be Early
Denis G. Pelli
12 Pattern Discrimination, Visual Filters, and Spatial
Sampling Irregularity
Hugh R. Wilson
Part V Color and Shading
13 A Bilinear Model of the Illuminant's Effect on
Color Appearance
David H. Brainard and Brian A. Wandell
14 Shading Ambiguity: Reflectance and Illumination
Michael D'Zmura
15 Transparency and the Cooperative Computation of
Scene Attributes
Daniel Kersten
Part VI Motion and TeXture
16 Theories for the Visual Perception of Local
Velocity and CoherentMotion
Norberto M. Grzywacz and Alan L. Yuille
17 Computational Modeling of Visual TeXture
Segregation
James R. Bergen and Michael S. Landy
18 CompleX Channels, Early Local Nonlinearities, and
Normalization in TeXture Segregation
Norma Graham
19 Orthogonal Distribution Analysis: A New Approach to
the Study of TeXture Perception
Charles Chubb and Michael S. Landy
Part VII 3D Shape
20 Shape from X: Psychophysics and Computation
Heinrich H. Bülthoff
21 Computational Issues in Solving the Stereo
Correspondence Problem
John P. Frisby and Stephen B. Pollard
22 Stereo, Surfaces, and Shape
Andrew J. Parker, Elizabeth B. Johnson, J. Stephen Mansfield, and
Yuede Yang
Author IndeX
Subject IndeX

What People are Saying About This

Horace Barlow

"The sceptical question is often asked 'What has the computational modelling of vision actually achieved?' This book consists of 22 chapters by a very well-selected set of authors, and a clear answer emerges.

Formerly, the most fruitful physical approach to the visual system was to regard it as an optical instrument connected to a box of incomprehensible wizardry. Here it is successfully treated as an optical instrument upon whose output computations of an experimentally testable nature are performed.
This radical change of viewpoint opens up a whole new range of questions and is likely to mark a turning point in the history of the subject, and perhaps in the whole of psychology."

Endorsement

A systematic offering of well formulated, insightful models, closely linked to the abundant riches of anatomy, physiology, and psychophysics. Excellent theory, constrained and interwined with well supported fact. Proof and summary of the enormous progress made in the vision sciences over the past 25 years.

-- Ken Nakayama, Professor of Psychology, Harvard University

Ken Nakayama

"A systematic offering of well formulated, insightful models, closely linked to the abundant riches of anatomy, physiology, and psychophysics. Excellent theory, constrained and interwined with well supported fact. Proof and summary of the enormous progress made in the vision sciences over the past 25 years."

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