ISBN-10:
0262610760
ISBN-13:
9780262610766
Pub. Date:
01/30/1992
Publisher:
MIT Press
Concepts, Kinds, and Cognitive Development

Concepts, Kinds, and Cognitive Development

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780262610766
Publisher: MIT Press
Publication date: 01/30/1992
Series: Learning, Development, and Conceptual Change
Pages: 344
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Frank C. Keil is Professor of Psychology at Yale University.

Susan Carey is the Henry A. Morss Jr. and Elisabeth W. Morss Professor of Psychology in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. She is the first woman to receive the 2009 David E. Rumelhart Prize, given annually since 2001 for significant contributions to the theoretical foundation of human cognition.

Table of Contents

Series Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Representation and Acquisition of Concepts
Concepts
Concept Development
Learning and Domain Specificity
Concepts vs. Knowledge
Some Traditional Views of Conceptual Development Reconsidered
Vygotsky
Werner
Related Points of View
Perceptual and Conceptual Categories
Spontaneous Definitions
The Traditional Themes Reconsidered
Conceptual Change and Theory Shifts
Natural Kinds, Nominal Kinds, and Artifacts
Problems with Prototypes
Natural Kinds, Theories, and Conceptual Change
The Underlying Structure: Natural Kinds and Other Kinds
Boyd's Causal Homeostasis
The Importance of Fuzzy Cases and Complex Artifacts
Conclusions and Developmental Speculations
The Development of Nominal Kind Concepts:
A Preliminary Model
Spontaneous Definitions: An Informal Study with Preschoolers
The Characteristic-to-Defining Shift Study
A Follow-up Study with Preschoolers
New Questions
Conclusions
Nominal Kinds and Domain Specificity
Five Conceptual Domains
Moral act terms
Meal terms
Tool terms
Kinship terms
Cooking terms
Conclusions
The Nature and Causes of Nominal Kind Shifts
Defining Features throughout Development
Changing Patterns of Input
Explicit Teaching of New Concepts
Nominal Kind Shifts in a Different Cultural Setting
Conclusions
Semantic and Conceptual Structure and the Nominal Kind Studies
Concepts vs. Word Meanings
Models of Concepts in Adults
Conclusions
Discoveries about Natural Kinds and Artifacts
Developing Stimuli and a Method
The First Discoveries Study
Stimuli
Procedure
Results
A Replication andLead-In Study for the Transformations Paradigm
Stimuli
Procedure
Results
Conclusions
Transformations on Natural Kinds and Artifacts
Method
Procedure
Results
A Cross-Cultural Replication and Extension
Conclusions
Property Transformations and Intercategory Distance
Ontological Categories and the Operations Paradigm
A Conservative Replication
Is the Ontological Level Special?
Conclusions
The Construction of an Intuitive Theory of Biological Kinds
Manipulating the Nature of the Transformation
Procedures and design
Results
Earlier Signs of Biological Theory
Contrasting Property Types
More Gradual Transformations
A Study on the Origins of Natural Kinds and Artifacts
Procedures and design
Results
Conclusions
Escaping the Original Sim.
The Appearance/Reality Distinction
Induction
Levels of Similarity and Analogical Thinking
Novice/Expert Differences
Concepts, Categorization, and Darwin
Related Topics
Conclusions
Concepts, Theories, and Development
Reassessing the Quinean Account
The Limits of Theories
Issues of Acquisition
The Structure of Theories
Appendix 1 Stimuli for Characteristic-to-Defining Shift Study
Appendix 2 Stimuli for Nominal Kinds and Domain Specificity Study
Appendix 3 Stimuli for Idiosyncratic Defining Features Study
Appendix 4 Stimuli for Nominal Kind Teaching Study
Appendix 5 Stimuli for First Discoveries Study
Appendix 6 Stimuli for First Transformations Study
Appendix 7 Stimuli for Contrasting Property Types Study
References
Author Index
Subject Index

What People are Saying About This

Endorsement

The exposition of the empirical studies is admirably clear, and the findings themselves are significant. For linguists interested in concept development and concept representation, and also for philosophers of language who are interested in the causal theory of reference, this book is valuable.

Paul Saka, Language

From the Publisher

Keil is arguably the most original thinker in the field of conceptual development.

James Russell, Times Higher Education Supplement

The exposition of the empirical studies is admirably clear, and the findings themselves are significant. For linguists interested in concept development and concept representation, and also for philosophers of language who are interested in the causal theory of reference, this book is valuable.

Paul Saka, Language

Language - Paul Saka

The exposition of the empirical studies is admirably clear, and the findings themselves are significant. For linguists interested in concept development and concept representation, and also for philosophers of language who are interested in the causal theory of reference, this book is valuable.

Times Higher Education Supplement - James Russell

Keil is arguably the most original thinker in the field of conceptual development.

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