Confessions of a Counterfeit Farm Girl

Confessions of a Counterfeit Farm Girl

by Susan McCorkindale

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451224934
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 10/07/2008
Pages: 368
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Susan McCorkindale is the author of two memoirs, No Place to Hide: More Confessions of a Counterfeit Farm Girl and Confessions of a Counterfeit Farm Girl. A former marketing director at Family Circle, McCorkindale is now a freelance advertising copywriter in Virginia. She is also the editor of SHE! magazine and a contributor to The Huffington Post. She is a graduate of Marymount Manhattan College.

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Confessions of a Counterfeit Farm Girl 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
ThirdSister More than 1 year ago
I returned this book after finishing it. I finished it in hopes that the author would get far less annoying, learn to wear boots in the cow pasture, stop spending all of her husband's money on designer purses, stop whining about the lack of Starbucks, stop talking about her boys' peeing and nose-picking habits, and stop overusing the words "tome" and "hinterland." Alas. The memoir was supposed to be funny, but I didn't crack a smile until at least page 50. Her voice was annoying, her informal and overused "This is probably a good time to tell you." showed a serious lack of journalistic maturity, and her "thing" seemed to be little (unnecessary, long, annoying, rarely humorous) footnotes. She took great pride in never adjusting to farm life (at the end of the book they move to a lake and she's excited because there's a Starbucks in town.get over it already) and spending a ton of money. At one point she orders 135 bathing suits to try on in the comfort of her own home, shipping back the 132 she didn't keep. If you have to try on 135 bathing suits to find one or three that you want to keep, you're a) not supposed to be wearing one anyway, b) too stupid to be near water, or c) have no concept of money or reality. The woman behaved like a petulant, airhead 13-year-old for the entire book, during which time she advertises herself as unable to do anything (can't cook, can't discipline her kids, can't drive a truck, can't blow-dry her own hair straight) and proud of it. Whatever floats your boat, Suzie. I got my money back.
dcwriter More than 1 year ago
I wanted to like this book--I thought I would like this book. Unfortunately, Susan McCorkindale is entirely out of touch with the average reader/person. She complains to no end about how hard it is to live in her brother-in-law's house that is "practically a four-star hotel." How annoying it is that the contractors aren't getting their renovations done on time (more items that would cost a FORTUNE). How inconvenient it is to have to spend 2 hours at the DMV--HEY SUSAN, ANYONE WHO HAS EVER MOVED TO A NEW STATE, OR EVEN A NEW HOME, SPENDS TWO HOURS AT THE DMV. AND MOST OF US HAVE JOBS THAT WE HAVE TO TAKE VACATION TIME FROM TO DO IT. She is condescending and comes off as a huge snob. I would never, ever recommend this book to ANY LIVING PERSON.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Where to start..... I guess I'll start with the author's (I use that term loosely) experience of working in New York. She happily and shamelessly admits to dumping her work onto her staff and goofing off while collecting a large salary (she gave the work to the staff but not the money). I can't help but wonder what her former employer thought when they read this. I hope that they gave serious thought to suing her. After writing about her days as a high paid slacker she goes on (and on and on) to talk about shopping, lots of shopping. In all fairness she also talks about her hair and her figure. I was wondering why any publisher would shell out money for this but it was probably financed by a variety of retail establishments. Starbucks (which is mentioned on almost every page) probably paid most of it. When she's not talking about shopping and trying (and failing) very hard to be funny she sometimes mentions her dim witted, Playboy addicted husband who she refers to by a number of nicknames as if he was some type of pet. Hearing about him isn't as bad as hearing about her spoiled brat sons. Of course it's not their fault they're spoiled. She goes into great detail about the lengths she goes to to spoil them. She goes into great detail about everything (e.g. her day spent trying on swimsuits) except life on the farm. Having made the transition from city life and a well paid job to rural life (and a not so well paid job) I know how many interesting things there are to write about when making that kind of transition. She doesn't write about any of them. She talks in the beginning of the book about how traumatized she was by 911 and then goes on to talk about her sons playing terrorist. Here's a quote from one of the little darlings "I'm a terrorist and I'm going to take you out." When she talked about the kids being "tricked out like terrorists" to "pop pigeons" I decided to stop torturing myself and turn the book into mulch which is as close to farm life as it's ever going to get.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I rarely provide reviews or feedback. However, I feel compelled to share that this was one of the few books that I threw away without finishing. It was terrible. I prefer to share books with friends or neighbors or donate to the local library's book sale. Not the case with this book. I usually try to read a book at least halfway through. I expected this book to provide an amusing summer read, but it was so clumsily written that I was forced to abandon it. The writer's attempts to be funny in describing her move from suburban New Jersey to rural Virginia are feeble. The anecdotes are contrived and manipulated. The story line, if there is one, is so disjointed that it's hard to follow. The writer should have stuck with her job in magazine marketing. The bottom line: If you enjoy good writing, don't buy this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Recommended by my local bn I found this book boring. It was the same thing page after page. Just about her life going from the city to the country. Her very ill mannered children and spouse who don't do anything to keep the house clean, etc.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Horrible book start to finish. Can't believe I wasted hard earned money on this spoiled snob's rant about moving to the "country"...she belongs in the city, where she is just another nameless face that can't, and shouldn't be heard... I thought this would be another lovely look at learning to live off the land and getting back to nature, gardening, wildlife. I could not have been more mistaken! This was so far removed from the normal person's reality, it was a shame harmless trees were destroyed to print it. Shame on the publisher, but lucky for Family Circle to be rid of her.
PaintedSpots More than 1 year ago
As someone who has grown up in the country and loved it this book is very off base. I could not get into it. Who payed to have this published and to think she has 2! I am glad I got it from my emedia library and did not buy this. Sounds like she needs to go back to the city. All she does it talk about how bad it was to move there, not wear heels and no starbucks. I hope she knows who dumb she sounds in this book.
rphalliburton on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was an hillariously funny book. I enjoyed it very much; however the hundreds of footnotes were distracting and I feel they could have been added in the contents by use of commas, etc.
itsJUSTme on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Liked this book, very funny!
agirlandherbooks on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
While McCorkindale's stories of adjusting to rural Virginia life after decades in suburban New Jersey are humorous, there's a clear strain of bitterness and more than a whiff of disdain for the residents of Fauquier County and its lack of big-box retailers. This falls flat with me, a suburban girl who opted to move to the boonies when the fast-paced world proved too much for me. She falls far short of feminine humor masters Laurie Notaro and Celia Rivenbark -- take a page from them, Suzy, and get back to us when you learn something.
karenlisa on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Confessions of a Counterfeit Farmgirl By Susan McCorkindale Quirky, fun memoir of successful NYC/NJ girl following her husbands "dream" to leave the rat race, move to the country and breathe that clean fresh air. Susan quits her fruitful yet lifeless position at a high profile magazine to live in the "sticks." Filled with mischief and anything but the mundane, this family of four starts over in very different territory, 500 acres of it! Her writer turned farmer husband immerses himself in this new life, his farm chores and tractor, while Susan stomps around the farm in 4 inch heels with chickens pecking at her $35 pedicure. It is tres cute to read and laugh with the girl next door. If you would like to enjoy a light, funny bit of "the grass is not always greener," here's your book.
SignoraEdie on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book had me laughing out loud. The author's sarcastic humor made the book.
dissed1 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Posh, cosmopolitan Susan McCorkindale didn't need to wait until she moved to the sticks to write a first-rate memoir; her sassy brand of humor would work anywhere. Confessions of a Counterfeit Farm Girl relates the McCorkindale family's move from New Jersey to a 500-acre cattle farm in Virginia. This requires Susan to relinquish her "big job" as a marketing director in New York--the most painful part of which is all the high end shopping she'll be distancing herself from.Interspersed amid vivid descriptions of life down on her farm, McCorkindale relays handy tongue-in-cheek tips for farm girl success, including pearls such as, "The barn is no place for a barbecue," and "Don't hop the electric fence. Hurdling anything on a farm is asking for trouble." A recurring theme is Susan's desire to turn the machinery storage building into a jazzercise center. Her hubby doesn't take the bait, but the one-sided justification Susan presents is hilarious. The opportunity to wax lyrical on adjusting to her new life seems plentiful, ranging from wrangling cows and chickens in her low-rise jeans and designer stilettos, to hiking in fashionable sweater and wedges. (Amid the "meadow muffins" there's always time to describe the wardrobe.)Susan keeps readers turning the pages with her witty one-liners and easy girlfriend-style narrative. Readers can't help but feel right in the thick of the mud-covered moment with her. And that's the essence of this tell-all. Farm girl isn't a moniker derived from a gal's bib overalls. It's a condition that dwells in the heart. With a plucky spirit and a good sense of humor, a true farm girl can always rise to the occasion. McCorkindale allows us to feel like an honorary farm chick, and in so doing, her debut book shines like the sun rising over fresh hay bales.
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I just couldn't get into this book. I thought some of the footnotes were funny, but then they distracted me from the story. Maybe I was just too distracted....by something shiny?
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