Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict

Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict

by Laurie Viera Rigler
3.8 74

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Overview

Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict by Laurie Viera Rigler

NATIONAL BESTSELLER

After nursing a broken engagement with Jane Austen novels and Absolut, Courtney Stone wakes up and finds herself not in her Los Angeles bedroom or even in her own body, but inside the bedchamber of a woman in Regency England. Who but an Austen addict like herself could concoct such a fantasy? Not only is Courtney stuck in another woman’s life, she is forced to pretend she actually is that woman; and despite knowing nothing about her, she manages to fool even the most astute observer. But not even her level of Austen mania has prepared Courtney for the chamber pots and filthy coaching inns of nineteenth-century England, let alone the realities of being a single woman who must fend off suffocating chaperones, condom-less seducers, and marriages of convenience. This looking-glass Austen world is not without its charms, however. There are journeys to Bath and London, balls in the Assembly Rooms, and the enigmatic Mr. Edgeworth, who may not be a familiar species of philanderer after all. But when Courtney’s borrowed brain serves up memories that are not her own, the ultimate identity crisis ensues. Will she ever get her real life back, and does she even want to?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780452289727
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 04/29/2008
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 582,560
Product dimensions: 7.98(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.65(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

LAURIE VIERA RIGLER's first novel, Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict, was a national bestseller. A Life Member of the Jane Austen Society of North America, Laurie teaches writing workshops, including classes at Vroman's, Southern California's oldest and largest independent bookstore.

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Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 74 reviews.
Laurel_Ann More than 1 year ago
Meet Courtney Stone, a modern LA singleton who mysteriously wakes up from a booze induced stupor to be transported back in time into the body of Regency era Jane Mansfield. No, that's not the actress Jayne Mansfield, but I love the play of words. We see plenty of that as author Laurie Viera Rigler places her modern thinking Jane Austen addicted heroine Courtney into the 1813 era life of Jane, an unmarried woman of thirty who is also facing a cross roads in her life after a riding accident knocks her unconscious and her threatening ma'ma is determined that she conform or be sent to the insane asylum. Even though Courtney has inhabited Jane's body, she has no recollection of her memories, only adding to her frustration and angst. Jane's world could not possibly be worse than her own shattered life back in the future after her fiancé Frank shagged their wedding cake designer, and her best friend Wes covered up for the cad. The engagement is off in her own life, but with her new personae Jane, it has yet to happen, much to the disapprobation of her mercenary ma'ma who is quite determined that she accept her latest suitor Charles Edgeworth. This dishy buck is even richer and more handsome than Mr. Darcy, so Courtney can not understand Jane's hesitation in accepting him. Not knowing their back story she trys to fake her way through, all the while reminding herself that it is all a dream and she will wake up or get back to her own life at any moment. Until then, she must negotiate her way through a time where repugnant body odor is ignored, blood letting common practice, and the social customs and mores for a women in her upper class station are so restrictive that her 21st-century sensibilities clash even after her years of reading Jane Austen novels. With stream of consciousness, pulse beating detail, we follow Courtney/Jane through her travails, cringe over her disgust, feel her anxiety, share in her laughter, and find hope after she meets a fortune teller in Bath who might have the answers to how this mysterious transformation took place, and how she can get home. Courtney Stone is one of those characters that you just want to wrap up in a big hug. A cross between Bridget Jones and Catherine Morland, author Viera Rigler has crafted a young woman so fresh, funny and real she could be your best friend, workmate or YOU in the same situation! Her use of driving first person narrative places the reader within her heroine's mind adding intensity, candor and humorous insight. Her encounter with Jane Austen herself on a London street is so hilariously embarassing that it was the high point of the novel for me. Once you have begun on Courtney/Jane's journey, you will be hard pressed to put it down, hooked on living her Regency era life through the filter of her quirky Jane Austen sensibilities. What Courtney discovers about herself through her gradual transformation will pleasantly remind you of why we all become Austen addicts to begin with. Laurel Ann, Austenprose
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Definitely worth the read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Beware the Jane Austen in the title! If you love Jane Austen this book is a sad disappointment. An American full of obsessions with body odour, beautiful teeth and self absorbtion trying to write about Regency England is a recipe for disaster. The story premise is quite good, unfortunately not a lot of research went into this book other than re-reading Jane Austen many times over. I did finish it, but wouldn't recommend buying it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
this book would have been great except for the author's quirky idea of having the woman who is time traveling arrive in a different body. this, at best, makes the whole plot less personal, and at worst, makes the novel down right creepy. It was a lovely idea for a time travel book that has been seriously marred by this odd time of plot twist.
Anonymous 24 days ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really expected to like this book, but I had a hard time staying interested in the story. The storyline was all over the place and the ending felt very rushed. I also wish there was more romance but I just didnt feel it. I am a little disappointed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Of jane in the body of the modern cortney who remembers finally how to drive. A pleasant read and much quucker than expected. New hard covers are using larger fonts and spacers in formatting. This was a library book borrow. Was a pbs mini series but the people exchanged and the modern janee was a friend visiting from a london suburbs then not yet built
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Naj More than 1 year ago
It is a truth universally acknowledged that it is human nature for our subconscious to wish for an escape when the going get's tough and Courtney Stone's subconscious didn't just "wish" for an escape. It conjured it. The hows and whys of the situation is still remains at loss for me even after I finished the book. Courtney Stone's life is in the gutter and at the end of the day she releases grief and takes refuge in all of Jane Austen's work. Somehow between the world of waking and dreaming, Courtney get's teleported 200 years back in time. She didn't land in the 1800's century as herself but as Jane Mansfield, a beautiful, slim, refined, and unmarried woman in her thirties. She doesn't know who Jane is except for the reflection she sees in the mirror and only gets glimpses and fragments of Jane's memory to help her blend in. Courtney/Jane was first convinced that all she was experiencing was a dream caused by her obsessive readings of everything Jane Austen. But as days, weeks and months passed on, she just had to accept and take her Jane Austen training and put it to good use to please Mrs. Mansfield and shoo the Lords and Dukes, who are great big horn-dogs. In this century, the author explains to us that there's more to the world Jane Austen has written. And that Austen only sugar coated the real happenings within a distinguished family, town balls, and overall, men of that time. Yes, mothers only think about their daughters marrying rich. Yes, they go to balls and dance way too much. Yes, there are rich handsome gentlemen who court and flirt. But Austen and many other authors of that age didn't tell us about the obsessive and urgency of the mothers, or that a lot of harassments occur during balls and most of these rich handsome gentlemen have nasty attitudes and only have one thing in mind. Courtney realizes this as she starts getting accustomed to the simple routine of an accomplished woman and starts traveling with her suitors sister to Bath and London. I enjoyed coming to terms with the reality of how the 1800's is really like and how suffocating it is to be seen with a male underclassmen unchaperoned. And at the end of the book, I came with the conclusion that I didn't really know if Courtney's life in the 21st century was real or where the real Jane Mansfield is. It was a good end but an end that still made you ask what really happened to Jane and Courtney.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
PanolaJD More than 1 year ago
After nursing a broken engagement with Jane Austen novels and Absolut, Courtney Stone wakes up and finds herself not in her Los Angeles bedroom or even in her own body, but inside the bedchamber of a woman in Regency England. Who but an Austen addict like herself could concoct such a fantasy? Not only is Courtney stuck in another woman’s life, she is forced to pretend she actually is that woman; and despite knowing nothing about her, she manages to fool even the most astute observer. But not even her level of Austen mania has prepared Courtney for the chamber pots and filthy coaching inns of nineteenth-century England, let alone the realities of being a single woman who must fend off suffocating chaperons, condom-less seducers, and marriages of convenience. This looking-glass Austen world is not without its charms, however. There are journeys to Bath and London, balls in the Assembly Rooms, and the enigmatic Mr. Edgeworth, who may not be a familiar species of philanderer after all. But when Courtney’s borrowed brain serves up memories that are not her own, the ultimate identity crisis ensues. Will she ever get her real life back, and does she even want to? Jane Mansfield (aka Courtney Stone) hasn't been herself lately . . . literally. She wakes up one morning in a Jane Austen-style dream (she thinks!) and soon finds out that her new historic life appears a lot more realistic than she first thought. Now she's stuck in another person's body, living a life that's not her own, and beginning to share memories of a world she knows nothing of. What's a modern lady to do when she can't keep up her normal twenty-first century lifestyle? There was a lot missing from the book that I would have enjoyed to read about, but overall it was a cute story. I'm a history buff myself, so all the daily troubles Jane/Courtney had to learn about throughout the tale wasn't anything new to me, but it was interesting watching her adapt. Strangely the book begins right when Jane/Courtney wakes up in her "new" world, which was a bit odd and confusing for the reader to understand just HOW? she got there. The tale wasn't written a 100% smoothly and there were gaps missing here and there; example: I would have liked to learn more about her dream within a dream with her reflection in the lake addressing her or I would have liked to see the main character have a harder time describing why she couldn't write, do needlework, or dance like her "old" self (personal traits). . . I feel the author took the easy way out. Plus, characters were kind of confusingly blending together from the past and present worlds, which really could have been some type of symbolism of Jane/Courtney's conscious, but again, never fully explained. Our protagonist's a little scattered brained sometimes and even comes off as adjusting to the whole time travel incident almost too easily. She doesn't appear to learn from her mistakes and doesn't really evolve as I enjoy seeing characters do throughout the book. Yet, there were funny parts that made me smile and it kept my attention throughout. I'm even curious enough to check out book #2 - Rude Awakenings of a Jane Austen Addict Likes: I think I enjoyed the historical aspects to the story more than anything else; the daily habits, the courting rituals, and the whole style of life during 1813-1814 England. Dislikes: I'm not sure if it was the simple writing style or the rambling on of Jane/Courtney's sill
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Should have listened to the bad reviews. There is no point at all to this story. Not even good for a rainy day read.
Amarillis More than 1 year ago
Enjoyable, but it didn't live up to my expectations.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ParisHeart More than 1 year ago
I really, really, really liked Rude Awakenings of a Jane Austen Addict. I didn't know that this was the second book in the series(?). I loved it! I rushed out to get the first book (Confessions of...) but found I liked the story line in the first book better. This does not diminish the fact that Laurie Rigler is a great writer and she does take the reader on a fantasy ride through time past and present and all things Jane. Read it for yourself and see. I hope there will be a third book to tie together both stories.
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