Confessions of a Teen Sleuth: A Parody

Confessions of a Teen Sleuth: A Parody

by Chelsea Cain, Lia Miternique

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Overview

America's favorite girl detective is back to set the record straight. According to our titian-haired heroine, she was not in fact a fictional character, but an intrepid real-life sleuth who investigated some of the twentieth century's biggest mysteries. And the famous series she starred in was not cooked up by a team of writers, but plagiarized from her exploits by her nosy college roommate Carolyn-who, not surprisingly, got a whole lot wrong.
Here are the daring escapes, brilliant hunches, and dependable stock characters, including interlopers from numerous other beloved series, that have delighted generations of fans. And here, also, are the details of teen-sleuth life that you never saw: the secret romances, reckless driving, minor drinking problems, political action, and domestic drama that have, up till now, remained hidden from these brave detectives' adoring public.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781596917354
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
Publication date: 12/18/2008
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 176
Sales rank: 1,050,612
File size: 1 MB

About the Author

Chelsea Cain is a longtime teen sleuth enthusiast and the author of The Hippie Handbook, the memoir Dharma Girl, and the forthcoming thriller Heartsick. She edited the anthology Wild Child, about daughters of the counterculture. She has written for a wide variety of publications and is currently a humor columnist for the Oregonian. She lives with her family in Portland, Oregon.

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Confessions of a Teen Sleuth: A Parody 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
bigorangemichael on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A parody of the Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys and other series that many of us read in our childhood. And yet, I found myself wishing it had been funnier. Maybe it's that I'm not as familar with the conventions of the various mystery series being parodied here, having not read one in years. But part of me felt like this was a recent Saturday Night Live skit--good for the first few moments, but extended past the point where it continued to be funny. The story follows Nancy across her life as she solves various mysteries and deals with the continuity errors from her various stories. It's amsuing, yes and the various mysteries do work hard to send up the elements of the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew novels. But there are times when it feels like Cain is trying too hard to go for the joke or too obviously setting up things for an eventual punchline. I expect a lot of this is the limitations placed on her by choosing to write in the style of a Nancy Drew mystery. I wanted to love this book, but I came away only slightly amused.
youthfulzombie on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Funny, but a little too outrageous. I would have preferred the situations remain in Nancy's youth, with maybe just a couple in her older years.
readingfiend on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book was hysterical. I read every one of my mother's 1930s set of Nancy Drew books growing up and I totally adored this tongue in cheek look at her life. Totally clever.
bkinetic on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Chelsea Cain captures the style and pacing of books in the Nancy Drew/Hardy Boys genre and turns it to a wonderful satire that is nonetheless respectful of the original sources. This isn't the place to look for anything deeply profound, but she includes an interesting sub-theme concerned with whether the genre of teen detective fiction can exist anymore.
rachelick on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Cain's parody of the well-known Nancy Drew series will be mildly entertaining to those fans who catch each facetious detail (Cain has clearly read the series more than once herself) but no more than that. A trip down Memory Lane, but unsatisfying and not incredibly funny as a stand-alone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
No it did not really happen. Did you know that Carolyne Keen is actually a man. It is true. It is the same man who writes the hardy boys. Love IceFawn.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Artistic_Fish More than 1 year ago
Sometimes a bit far-fetched, but I must say, I laughed out loud at alot of it! Ever wonder what happened to Nancy as she grew older? Ned? George or Bess? Ms. Cain is happy to illuminate you with this tongue-in-cheek look at Nancy Drew, wife and mother.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book was good, but it had a few twists that I wasn't expecting. It's an autobiography written by nancy about her life. It includes all the rest of the usuall people but she ends up married to one of the Hardy brothers and her son is a hippi in the 60's which i never pictured before, seeing as how her original series was written in the 1930's and she seemed so prim and propper. Nevertheless every Nancy Drew fan should try and read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Did this happen.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have a good sense of humor but to remix keens awesome book series into a ##### is way over the top. Ok,fine,if your rude enough to write something like this-dont publish it ok?
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Chelsea Cain has done a wonderful job of taking my favorite characters from my youth--Nancy Drew, Ned Nickerson, the Hardy Boys (Joe & Frank), the Bobbsey Twins, and several more--and turning them into a 21st-century novel that had me laughing out loud throughout the entire story.

Granted, THIS story is probably not for the teen-set, unless your son or daughter is more mature. The Nancy and friends of THIS book drink and smoke, make out, have sex and even an affair, and in general aren't as perfect as their former counterparts. That said, however, CONFESSIONS OF A TEEN SLEUTH is a thoroughly enjoyable book that reads as a series of mysteries solved, of course, by the aging Nancy Drew. She starts out as the teen sleuth of the 1920's, and ends up an octogenarian in her 80's in the 1990's.

Very funny and amusing, I'm glad I picked up a copy of this book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Chelsea Cain has done a wonderful job of taking my favorite characters from my youth--Nancy Drew, Ned Nickerson, the Hardy Boys (Joe & Frank), the Bobbsey Twins, and several more--and turning them into a 21st-century novel that had me laughing out loud throughout the entire story. Granted, THIS story is probably not for the teen-set, unless your son or daughter is more mature. The Nancy and friends of THIS book drink and smoke, make out, have sex and even an affair, and in general aren't as perfect as their former counterparts. That said, however, CONFESSIONS OF A TEEN SLEUTH is a thoroughly enjoyable book that reads as a series of mysteries solved, of course, by the aging Nancy Drew. She starts out as the teen sleuth of the 1920's, and ends up an octogenarian in her 80's in the 1990's. Very funny and amusing, I'm glad I picked up a copy of this book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ok, I'll confess too. I don't like Nancy Drew. I tried to read her growing up, and just could not connect with the beautiful, titian-haired, rich, perfect teen. No, I was a Trixie Belden girl. I could identify with her. I too was short, 'sturdy,' opened my mouth before thinking, and was definitely not rich nor perfect. I picked up Confessions of a Teen Sleuth not because it was about Nancy Drew, but because of the opening paragraph of the introduction. 'If you are reading this, then I am gone and this manuscript, per my instruction, has been delivered to the writer Chelsea Cain for publication as she sees fit. I chose Ms. Cain as my editor based on the merits of her four-volume Trixie Belden biography, which won the National Book Award last year.' That got my attention. Alas, there is no such biography (I looked-maybe she'll write it someday), but I decided to read the book anyway-perhaps Trixie would show up somewhere (she doesn't, but her daughter does.). That being said, Confessions is a witty little book (it's only 160 pages-a nice easy evening's read), based on the idea that Nancy Drew was a real person (and Carolyn Keene merely a jealous college roommate who made a living off of Nancy's experiences). It's written in the style of the old mysteries, complete with over-blown details of who wore what and words like 'Jeepers.' I probably missed a lot of the inside jokes, but those I did catch were amusing. Quite a few of the classic teen sleuths show up: the Hardy boys, Cherry Ames (who does not get along with Nancy at all), Tom Swift, Vicki Barr, and many others. A note of caution. This is not a book I'd recommend for preteens/teens (especially ones who already love Nancy Drew). Like much fanfic, one of the main plots is definitely adult (and adulterous) in nature (and that's all I can reveal). Despite the slight tarnishing of the characters' squeaky-clean images, Confessions is still an enjoyable little parody.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found this book to be entirely too self-obsessed. Nancy comes across as being very stuck on herself and her superority really got to me. I had to stop before my childhood Nancy Drew was ruined for me
Mysterychik More than 1 year ago
Our book group does not read appliances. We read books. You know, those things with glossy, feel good covers, clean pages, new book smell...hopefully complete with great stories. As an author, you know about the five senses thing. Well, we wanted to experience this tome as our book group cut our teeth on Nancy Drew (wrote a few mysteries myself) but-- Come on Ms. Cain, head to booklocker and get thyself in print. Let us know when you do. Meantime, we're going to have to find a good old-fashioned mystery to read. One with glossy, feel good covers, clean pages...