Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives -- How Your Friends' Friends' Friends Affect Everything You Feel, Think, and Do

Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives -- How Your Friends' Friends' Friends Affect Everything You Feel, Think, and Do

by Nicholas A. Christakis, James H. Fowler

Paperback

$16.19 $17.99 Save 10% Current price is $16.19, Original price is $17.99. You Save 10%.
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Wednesday, June 19

Overview

Celebrated scientists Nicholas Christakis and James Fowler explain the amazing power of social networks and our profound influence on one another's lives.

Your colleague's husband's sister can make you fat, even if you don't know her. A happy neighbor has more impact on your happiness than a happy spouse. These startling revelations of how much we truly influence one another are revealed in the studies of Drs. Christakis and Fowler, which have repeatedly made front-page news nationwide.

In CONNECTED, the authors explain why emotions are contagious, how health behaviors spread, why the rich get richer, even how we find and choose our partners. Intriguing and entertaining, CONNECTED overturns the notion of the individual and provides a revolutionary paradigm-that social networks influence our ideas, emotions, health, relationships, behavior, politics, and much more. It will change the way we think about every aspect of our lives.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316036139
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Publication date: 01/12/2011
Pages: 338
Sales rank: 121,768
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Nicholas A. Christakis, MD, PhD, is a professor at Harvard University with joint appointments in the Departments of Health Care Policy, Sociology, and Medicine, and in 2009 was named one of Time magazine's 100 most influential people in the world. James H. Fowler, PhD, is an associate professor at the University of California, San Diego, in the Department of Political Science and The Center for Wireless and Population Health Systems, and was named one of the "most inspiring scientists" by the San Diego Science Festival. Christakis and Fowler's research has appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show, Good Morning America, Today, and The Colbert Report, and on the front pages of the New York Times, Washington Post, and USA Today.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii

1 In the Thick of It 3

2 When You Smile, the World Smiles with You 33

3 Love the One You're With 61

4 This Hurts Me As Much As It Hurts You 95

5 The Buck Starts Here 135

6 Politically Connected 172

7 It's in Our Nature 210

8 Hyperconnected 253

9 The Whole Is Great 287

Acknowledgments 307

Notes 311

Illustration Credits 327

Index 329

Reading Group Guide 339

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives -- How Your Friends' Friends' Friends Affect Everything You Feel, 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
mattparfitt on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Interesting and timely ideas, though the authors sometimes belabor the obvious and their style is plodding.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There's some interesting information here, but the book expounds on the topic way longer than necessary. It got boring and didactic very fast.
TheNeonNarwhal More than 1 year ago
There is truth hidden between the pages of Christakis and Fowler's "Connected," but though true, these "discoveries" are far from anything new. Connected explores the way our social networks help influence us to feel or act in certain ways. For example, we can understand that if one's best friend begins to eat more, we in turn will eat more as well due to the sheer amount of time we share with him or her. The authors of this work, however, spend 10-15+ pages discussing this issue that probably could be summed up sufficiently in five sentences. Over-all, "connected" is not terrible, but it is not earth-shattering either. I would suggest reading it for the few sections that interest you -- keep in mind that in many cases (because both of the authors are male, therefore the male mind is what they understand best) the book can feel very sexist. In summary: not a terrible book, but is rather one I would recommend picking up at the library or used book store. There are more intelligent (for lack of a better word) psychology books on the shelves that are better deserving of your top dollar.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago