A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) by Mark Twain

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, by Mark Twain, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:

  • New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars
  • Biographies of the authors
  • Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events
  • Footnotes and endnotes
  • Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work
  • Comments by other famous authors
  • Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations
  • Bibliographies for further reading
  • Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate
All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.

One of the greatest satires in American literature, Mark Twain’s A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court begins when Hank Morgan, a skilled mechanic in a nineteenth-century New England arms factory, is struck on the head during a quarrel and awakens to find himself among the knights and magicians of King Arthur’s Camelot.

What follows is a culture clash of the first magnitude, as practical-minded Hank, disgusted with the ignorance and superstition of the people, decides to enlighten them with education and technology. Through a series of wonderfully imaginative adventures, Twain celebrates American homespun ingenuity and democracy as compared to the backward ineptitude of a chivalric monarchy. At the same time, however, Twain raises the question of whether material progress necessarily creates a better society. As Hank becomes more powerful and self-righteous, he also becomes more ruthless, more autocratic, and less able to control events, until the only way out is a massively destructive war.

While the dark pessimism that would fully blossom in Twain’s later works can be discerned in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, the novel will nevertheless be remembered primarily for its wild leaps of imagination, brilliant wit, and entertaining storytelling.

With over 200 of the original illustrations by Dan Beard.

Stephen Railton teaches American literature at the University of Virginia. His most recent book is Mark Twain: A Short Introduction.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781566197069
Publisher: Sterling Publishing
Publication date: 08/15/1995
Series: Barnes & Noble Classics Series
Pages: 307

About the Author

Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835-1910), best known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an author and humorist noted for the novels The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (which has been called "The Great American Novel") and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, among many other books. Twain was raised in Hannibal, Missouri, which later provided the setting for Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, and he spent time as a riverboat pilot on the Mississippi River before finding fame as a writer.

Date of Birth:

November 30, 1835

Date of Death:

April 21, 1910

Place of Birth:

Florida, Missouri

Place of Death:

Redding, Connecticut

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A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 226 reviews.
DaveWheeler More than 1 year ago
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is a superb book and I highly recommend you check it out, so you may be wondering why I am reviewing this as one star only. This version of the nook book is busted, in the middle of chapter 39 (XXXIX) it cuts to an entirely different book! If this is what Barnes and Nobles is going to let happen to the nook this device will fail horribly.
Ramona Downing More than 1 year ago
Too many pages are missing or unreadable to even follow the story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great book... when it's more than three pages of the book! Seriously, this is seven pages of unreadable BS. Thanks for taking up storage space, ripoff! I'd give it zero if I could.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Entire book consisted of 7 pages, beginning on page 304 of the original book, followed by 305, 384, and then the End.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This version is part of Google's initiative to digitize books. It clearly has been scanned and had OCR (optical character recognition) run to convert to digital text, with NO PROOFING of the scan, leaving numerous incorrect characters - typically several words per page with errors. Very distracting to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Would love to read this sometime, but not this way.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There are just too many spelling mistakes in this version. I quit after only 2 pages. Hopefully you can find a better copy than this one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There are 2 actual pages of almost unreadable words. Whole story is not here.
eurekatpt More than 1 year ago
Plodded through this ebook. Wanted to read it because it was a classic but in finishing it, I've decided I'm not a big fan of social commentaries. Definitely had several humorous moments though and witty one-liners.
Anonymous 5 months ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
How about a refund?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you are too full of yourself, or consider yourself of nobility, this book will give you an idea of Mark Twain's feeling about people like that. You have to not be too thin-skinned as he only thinly disguises his feelings. But the story is classic and a fun read as long as you recognize what Mark Twain is doing. A lot stretches the imagination, but in some cases that exercise is a good thing. It was not meant to be taken literally, since the premise is not actually possible, but is one man's opinion of what seemed to be wrong with the world. It's dressed in medieval garb, and a fun read. Don't miss this because of what others said - try it for yourself, and persevere through the entire book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hopefully this review is tied to the right file - the one with a portrait of Mark Twain.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Too many typos and "strange" symbols.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not worth the storage space.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was excited to read this book, but part of the story was cut off!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was ok. There were a bunch of typos which made it annoying. Some parts were exciting and others were just plain boring, but what really bothered me though is the way the author critisizes the Church!!! What he says is simply NOT true and the reader should not believe it. -someone who knows what she's talking about
Cal-Dream-in More than 1 year ago
Reads like to days stupid headlines. Twain would laugh American government today, and it's NEVER good to have Twain laughing at you!