Contested Issues in Student Affairs: Diverse Perspectives and Respectful Dialogue

Contested Issues in Student Affairs: Diverse Perspectives and Respectful Dialogue

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Overview

Contested Issues in Student Affairs: Diverse Perspectives and Respectful Dialogue by Peter M. Magolda

What is your level of understanding of the many moral, ideological, and political issues that student affairs educators regularly encounter? What is your personal responsibility to addressing these issues? What are the rationales behind your decisions? What are the theoretical perspectives you might choose and why? How do your responses compare with those of colleagues?

Contested Issues in Student Affairs augments traditional introductory handbooks that focus on functional areas (e.g., residence life, career services) and organizational issues. It fills a void by addressing the social, educational and moral concepts and concerns of student affairs work that transcend content areas and administrative units, such as the tensions between theory and practice, academic affairs and student affairs, risk taking and failure; and such as issues of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and spirituality. It places learning and social justice at the epicenter of student affairs practice.

The book addresses these issues by asking 24 critical and contentious questions that go to the heart of contemporary educational practice. Intended equally for future student affairs educators in graduate preparation programs, and as reading for professional development workshops, it is designed to stimulate reflection and prompt readers to clarify their own thinking and practice as they confront the complexities of higher education.

Student affairs faculty, administrators, and graduate students here situate these 24 questions historically in the professional literature, present background information and context, define key terms, summarize the diverse ideological and theoretical responses to the questions, make explicit their own perspectives and responses, discuss their political implications, and set them in the context of the changing nature of student affairs work.

Each chapter is followed by a response that offers additional perspectives and complications, reminding readers of the ambiguity and complexity of many situations.

Each chapter concludes with a brief annotated bibliography of seminal works that offer additional information on the topic, as well as with a URL to a moderated blog site that encourages further conversation on each topic and allows readers to teach and learn from each other, and interact with colleagues beyond their immediate campus. The website invites readers to post blogs, respond to each other, and upload relevant resources. The book aims to serve as a conversation starter to engage professionals in on-going dialogue about these complex and enduring challenges.

Short Contents
The 24 questions are organized into four units.
I. The Philosophical Foundations of Student Affairs in Higher Education explores the implications and complications of student affair educators placing learning at the epicenter of their professional work.
II. The Challenges of Promoting Learning and Development explores the challenges associated with learning-centered practice.
III. Achieving Inclusive and Equitable Learning Environments addresses crafting learning environments that include students whose needs are often labeled “special,” or students and/or student subcultures that are often marginalized and encouraged to adapt to normalizing expectations.
IV. Organizing Student Affairs Practice for Learning and Social Justice addresses the organizational and professional implications of placing learning and social justice at the epicenter of student affairs practice.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781579225834
Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC
Publication date: 09/28/2011
Pages: 498
Product dimensions: 6.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.50(d)

About the Author

Marcia B. Baxter Magolda is Distinguished Professor of Educational Leadership at the Miami University of Ohio and a nationally recognized author and speaker on student development and learning. In 2007 she received the Association for the Study of Higher Education’s Research Achievement Award for her outstanding contribution to advancing student learning. Her scholarship addresses the evolution of learning and development in college and subsequent adult life, and educational practice to promote self-authorship. Her seventh and eighth books respectively are Authoring Your Life and Development and Assessment of Self-Authorship.

Peter M. Magolda is Professor of Educational Leadership at Miami University. He teaches culture and inquiry seminars. His scholarship focuses on ethnographic studies of college students, critical issues in qualitative research, and program evaluation. He is co-author of It’s All About Jesus: Faith as an Oppositional Collegiate Subculture with Kelsey Ebben, and serves, or has served, on the editorial boards of Research in Higher Education and the Journal of Educational Research. He is an ACPA Senior Scholar inductee, and in 2004 received the School of Education and Allied Profession’ Richard Delp Outstanding Faculty Member award, as well as the Maude Stewart Alumni Award from The Ohio State University.

Table of Contents

PREFACE: Peter Magolda and Marcia Baxter Magolda, Miami University

1) WHAT COUNTS AS “ESSENTIAL” KNOWLEDGE FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS EDUCATORS?
Intellectual Curiosity and Lifelong Learning—Marcia Baxter Magolda & Peter Magolda, Miami University Response—Jill Carnaghi, Washington University in St. Louis & Victor Boschini, Texas Christian University

2) HOW DOES THE PERCEPTION THAT LEARNING TAKES PLACE EXCLUSIVELY IN CLASSROOMS PERSIST?
Expanding the Learning Environment—Mimi Benjamin, Cornell University & Florence Hamrick, Rutgers University Response—Laura Blake Jones, University of Michigan

3) HOW ARE DICHOTOMIES SUCH AS SCHOLAR-PRACTITIONER AND THEORY-PRACTICE HELPFUL AND HARMFUL TO THE PROFESSION?
Developing Professional Judgment—Gregory Blimling, Rutgers University Response—Ellen Broido, Bowling Green State University

4) IF STUDENT AFFAIRS-ACADEMIC AFFAIRS COLLABORATION IS SUCH A GOOD IDEA, WHY ARE THERE SO FEW EXAMPLES OF THESE PARTNERSHIPS IN AMERICAN HIGHER EDUCATION?
Transforming Our Approach to Education: Cultivating Partnerships and Dialogue—Victor Arcelus, Gettysburg College Response—Jamie Lester, George Mason University

PART TWO: CHALLENGES OF PROMOTING LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT

5) IN THIS AGE OF CONSUMERISM, WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS OF “GIVING STUDENTS WHAT THEY WANT?”
Have it Your Way U—Tracy Davis, Western Illinois University Response—Lisa Boes, Harvard University

6) WHAT ARE THE RISKS AND BENEFITS ASSOCIATED WITH ALLOWING STUDENTS TO FAIL, IF LEARNING RESULTS?
Creative Learning for Challenging Times: The Promise and Peril of Risk—Michele Welkener, University of Dayton Response—Kelsey Ebben Gross, Central New Mexico Community College

7) DOES SOCIAL NETWORKING ENHANCE OR IMPEDE STUDENT LEARNING?
Social Networking and Student Learning: Friends without Benefits—Mark R. Connolly, University of Wisconsin—Madison Response—Ana Martinez Aleman, Boston College

8) WHAT IS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CHANGING UNIVERSITY POLICY AND CHANGING STUDENT NORMS?
Where Policy Meets Student Behavior—Jonathan Poullard, University of California, Berkley Response—J. Michael Denton, Miami University.

9) IF CURBING ALCOHOL ABUSE ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES IS AN “IMPOSSIBLE DREAM,” WHY BOTHER WITH INTERVENTIONS AIMED AT CURBING ABUSE?
Navigating the Drinking Culture to Become Productive Citizens—James P. Barber, College of William and Mary Response—Heidi Levine, Cornell College

10) WHAT SHOULD UNIVERSITIES DO ABOUT OVERLY INVOLVED PARENTS?
Aiming to Redefine, not Restrict, Parental Involvement: How to Foster Developmentally Effective Parent-Student Partnerships—Kari Taylor, Miami University Response—John Lowery, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

11) IN THIS AGE OF ACCOUNTABILITY, WHAT COUNTS AS GOOD; AND HOW DO WE KNOW IF STUDENT AFFAIRS EDUCATORS “REALLY” MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE LIVES OF STUDENTS?
Student affairs in the Age of Accountability and Assessment—Jillian Kinzie, Indiana University, Bloomington Response—Andrew Wall, University of Rochester

12: WHY IS IT SO CHALLENGING FOR COLLEGIANS AND STUDENT AFFAIRS EDUCATORS TO TALK ABOUT RACE?
The Elephant in the Room—Race—Julie J. Park, Miami University Response—Christopher Mundell, Columbus College of Art and Design

13) DO IDENTITY CENTERS (E.G., WOMEN’S CENTERS, ETHNIC CENTERS, LGBT CENTERS) DIVIDE RATHER THAN UNITE HIGHER EDUCATION FACULTY, STUDENTS, AND ADMINISTRATORS? IF SO, WHY ARE THEY SO PREVALENT ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES?
Identity Centers: An Idea Whose Time Has Come...and Gone?—Kristen A. Renn, Michigan State University Response—Lori Patton Davis, University of Denver

14) WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO “ACT AFFIRMATIVELY” IN HIRING PROCESSES?
Diversity as a Strategic Imperative in Higher Education—Karen E. Miller and J. Douglas Toma, Institute of Higher Education, University of Georgia Response—Patricia King, University of Michigan

15) GIRL OR WOMAN?…DORM OR RESIDENCE HALL? …WHAT’S THE BIG DEAL ABOUT LANGUAGE?
The Power of Language—Stephen John Quaye, University of Maryland Response—Ebelia Hernandez, Rutgers University

16) WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS OF PROVIDING “SPECIAL” CONSIDERATIONS TO PARTICULAR STUDENTS?
" Special” Considerations for a Universal Problem: Campus Accommodations—Deborah McCarthy, University of South Florida Response—Peter Haverkos, Miami University—Hamilton

17) WHAT ARE THE RESPONSIBILITIES AND LIMITS OF STUDENT AFFAIRS EDUCATORS’ ROLE IN ADDRESSING BURGEONING STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES?
Supporting Collegians’ Mental Health: Collaboration and Role Differentiation—David B. Spano, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Response—Paul Oliaro, California State University at Fresno & Lori Varlotta, California State University at Sacramento

18) WHAT ROLES SHOULD STUDENT AFFAIRS EDUCATORS PLAY IN ATTENDING TO STUDENTS’ RELIGIOUS AND SPIRITUAL NEEDS?
Creating Space for Spirituality and Religion in Student Affairs Practice – Alyssa N. Bryant, North Carolina State University Response – Michele Murray, Seattle University & Robert Nash, University of Vermon

19) HOW DO STUDENT AFFAIRS EDUCATORS PROTECT FREEDOM OF SPEECH WHILE ENSURING CIVIL DISCOURSE?
Putting the Hammer Down – Tobias W. Uecker, Kenyon College Response – Katie Sardelli, Winthrop University

IV. Organizing Student Affairs Practice for Learning and Social Justice

20) WHY IS THE GAP SO WIDE BETWEEN ESPOUSING A SOCIAL JUSTICE AGENDA TO PROMOTE LEARNING AND ENACTING IT? WHAT COULD STUDENT AFFAIRS EDUCATORS DO TO GENUINELY ENACT A SOCIAL JUSTICE IDEOLOGY?
Moving Beyond Good Intentions – Joel D. Zylstra, Center for Transforming Mission Education Response – Nana Osei-Kofi, Iowa State University

21) WHAT WOULD STUDENT AFFAIRS ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES LOOK LIKE IF THEY SUPPORTED INCLUSIVE, LEARNING-CENTERED PRACTICES?
Advancing Inclusive and Learning-centered Practice: Redesigning Student Affairs Work – John P. Dugan, Loyola University Response – Tatiana Suspitsyna, The Ohio State University

22) WHAT FORMS WOULD SUPERVISION TAKE TO MODEL INCLUSIVE, LEARNING-ORIENTED PRACTICE?
The Case for Developmental Supervision – Michael G. Ignelzi, Slippery Rock University Response – Patty Perillo, Davidson College

23) WHY DO STUDENT AFFAIRS EDUCATORS STRUGGLE TO SET PROFESSIONAL BOUNDARIES?
Establishing and Maintaining Healthy Professional and Personal Boundaries –
Kathleen (Kate) R. Linder, Indiana University of Pennsylvania Response – Kristina Mickel Clement, Georgia State University

24) HOW DO PROFESSIONALS NAVIGATE SITUATIONS WHEN THEIR PROFESSIONAL BELIEFS CLASH WITH THEIR SUPERVISORS’ OR ORGANIZATIONS’ BELIEFS?
Engaging in Dialogues about Difference in the Workplace – Peter Magolda & Marcia Baxter Magolda, Miami University Response – Rozana Carducci, University of Missouri—Columbia

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