The Critique of Pure Reason

The Critique of Pure Reason

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Critique of Pure Reason 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Anyone who is interested in Philosophy needs to read Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Why do I make this demand? Because you will marvel at learning about the ideality of space and time, and how the world conforms to our ways of knowing, and not vice-versa. Sure, you might not believe Kant, or agree with his arguments, but, the intellectual pleasure that you will receive from this work will last your entire life. A pleasure that will resonate within you every moment you look at the stars showing themselves serenely, at a clock that makes you wonder if this hand really moves, or at the sea sad and salty, wondering, if what happened yesterday really happens tomorrow at the same time as today. However, the most important thing about Kant is that it will prepare you for Schopenhauer, and a better understanding of his view that the world (noumena) is will, and how he comes to that conclusion despite Kant's skepticism at ever having knowledge of the thing-in-itself.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Learn about why you might think the way you do, and how ethics and reasoning may pave the way. Standard text for college ethics and philosophy classes
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is meant to be read by all.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
For intellectual exercise, you will be hard pressed to find a more challenging read. Kant, a popular German professor and lecturer strives to prove through logic the differences and existence of 2 kinds of knowledge: 1) knowledge gained from experience~a posteriori and 2) knowledge not gained through experience~ a priori and it is on the second kind that he focuses his proofs.
davidjoho More than 1 year ago
The book itself is a classic, of course. But the poor quality of the character recognition makes this difficult to read. On the other hand, it's free.