The Crossing (Border Trilogy Series #2)

The Crossing (Border Trilogy Series #2)

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Audiobook(Cassette - Abridged, 2 cassettes)

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Overview

The Crossing (Border Trilogy Series #2) by Cormac McCarthy, Brad Pitt

2 cassettes / 3 hours
Read by Brad Pitt

Brad Pitt reads Cormac McCarthy's The Crossing.

Following All the Pretty Horses in Cormac McCarthy's Border Trilogy, The Crossing is a novel whose force of language is matched only by its breadth of experience and depth of thought.

In the bootheel of New Mexico hard on the frontier, Billy and Boyd Parham are just boys in the years before the Second World War, but on the cusp of unimaginable events.  First comes a trespassing Indian and the dream of wolves running wild amongst the cattle lately brought onto the plain by settlers — this when all the wisdom of trappers has disappeared along with the trappers themselves.  And so Billy sets forth at the age of sixteen on an unwitting journey into the souls of boys and animals and men.  Having trapped a she-wolf he would restore to the mountains of Mexico, he is long gone and returns to find everything he left behind transformed utterly in this absence.  Except his kid brother, Boyd, with whom he strikes out yet again to reclaim what is theirs — thus crossing into "that antique gaze from whence there could be no way back forever."

An essential novel by any measure,

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780679427032
Publisher: Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group
Publication date: 06/01/1994
Series: Border Trilogy Series , #2
Edition description: Abridged, 2 cassettes
Product dimensions: 4.39(w) x 7.02(h) x 0.79(d)

About the Author

Cormac McCarthy is the author of the Border Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, The Crossing, and Cities of the Plain.

READER BIO
Brad Pitt's film credits include Thelma and Louise, A River Runs Through It, Interview With the Vampire, Seven, Legends of the Fall, and Seven Years in Tibet.  For his performance in Twelve Monkeys, he was awarded the Golden Globe for Best Performance by a Supporting Actor.

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The Crossing (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 51 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In ¿The Crossing¿, Cormac McCarthy evokes the same vanishing ranch culture of the American southwest and northern Mexico as in his ¿All the Pretty Horses¿. In this case, it is set in the late 1930s when the horse-based life is still alive, but is beginning to be replaced by a more modern, automobile-based way of life. McCarthy describes three difficult, physical, dangerous trips into Mexico by Billy Parham and, in one case, with his brother Boyd. The brothers depend on themselves and their knowledge of horses, guns, and how to live off the land in dealing with horse thieves and robbers in a Mexico that is more lawless than the United States. McCarthy reveals a way of life that is much more intense and physically demanding than our sheltered modern life. However, there are two negatives that lower my rating of this book. First, McCarthy makes extensive use of Spanish dialogue throughout the book without providing any English translations. Secondly, the book contains two long (approximately 20 pages each) monologues, one by a hermit priest and one by the wife of a blind soldier, who lost his sight in the Mexican revolution. With these monologues, McCarthy seems to be trying to add a philosophical dimension to the novel (e.g., about God, human suffering, chance in life, blindness and death), but both monologues are tiresome and not well integrated into the novel.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Even thought i can not really understand a single word of spanish, just to simply read and know the tone of the words you can understand the book. I am not worried what others think about having to read half a dozen pages in spanish, you simply know what is being said by the tone. This really is another great American Classic. IMO it will go down in American Literature as one of the true greats.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If the Spanish bothers you that much, invest in a five dollar espagnol/anglais dictionary. Its worth it! Parham's journey is a long harrowing trek of a boy's voyage of self discovery into becoming a man. It takes you away and you'll want to go back again soon after its done; its a sweet pain that you'll learn to cherish.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although there is hardly any conversation in this book, I was still captivated by the story of young Billy Parham and his brother, Boyd. McCarthy paints quite a picture of their rough life in a desolate, harsh land. The ending was so sad! If you like this book, you need to read THE CITIES OF THE PLAIN by the same author. It picks up when Billy is 27 years old and it has a lot more conversation and characters in it. I will highly recommend either of these books!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
McCarthy has written better works.  While I really like his clean prose, the vulgar language is a turn-off at times.
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*Sits down gracefully with her new purple hoodie fitting comfortably around her white body* "hello," she calls, "Aurora? You here?" *She puts in her earbuds and waits, her bright green eyes roving for the butterfly*
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Good read following All The Pretty Horses
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Craig Rot More than 1 year ago
A fifth crossing for me, although this one undertaken in exceptional summer heat and in the company of bad tequila, likely as close to ideal as McCarthy intended it.
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