CSS Pocket Reference: Visual Presentation for the Web

CSS Pocket Reference: Visual Presentation for the Web

by Eric A. Meyer
4.0 7

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CSS Pocket Reference 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Extremely helpful and easy to understand
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a big fan of O'Reilly's 'Pocket Reference' books and this one was no disappointment. In fact, this guide by Eric Meyer is exceptionally well written with clear explanations of CSS terminology. The first few sections on rules, precedence, positioning, layouts, etc. helped me - fairly new to CSS - grasp the gist of CSS better than more extensive tutorials because of Meyer's concise explanations and well-conceived illustrations. Of course, the long-term value of these reference books is the alphabetical list of terms with definitions, applications, syntax and examples. As with the other Pocket Reference books, a beginner should not come to this book for an introduction to CSS. There are many great books (some by Meyer) and web sites that get you up and running quickly. But even the beginner will find this invaluable as a quick reference book throughout the learning process. I keep it right next to my screen when doing any web work. Highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Eric Meyer is a respected name where CSS is concerned and his books on CSS are well-regarded. This pocket guide, however, does not meet his usual high standard. The main failing is the lack of information on CSS Level 2. Even though the guide is a few years old, all the important information about CSS2 was available at the time, making its omission in a pocket guide peculiar. The other failing is poor typesetting, making the entry for individual properties hard to see and thus hard to find. This problem is magnified because there is no index, so finding a given item is a hit or miss proposition. I expect a pocket reference to be complete and efficient. O'Reilly misses the boat with this one.