The Custom of the Country

The Custom of the Country

by Edith Wharton
4.0 16

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Overview

The Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton

The Custom of the Country is a 1913 novel by Edith Wharton. It tells the story of Undine Spragg, a Midwestern girl who attempts to ascend in New York City society.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940015537338
Publisher: Philtre Libre
Publication date: 09/29/2012
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 364 KB

About the Author

Edith Wharton (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937), was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer.

Date of Birth:

January 24, 1862

Date of Death:

August 11, 1937

Place of Birth:

New York, New York

Place of Death:

Saint-Brice-sous-Forêt, France

Education:

Educated privately in New York and Europe

Customer Reviews

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The Custom Of The Country 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's interesting to read how ruthless and unscrupulous people can be for their own self-preservation. Undine is a character I loved to hate. This novel could be a social commentary of life today. Fabulous vocabulary! It is a slow read, but worth it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was a literature major in college a long time ago: I'd never heard mention of this novel. She is such a fine author and this is my favorite of all! If you like her work, if you like American literature, you won't be disappointed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Timeless wisdom about women's issues in the society of consumerism as we see as the American Dream.
Eowyn24 More than 1 year ago
Undine reminds me in a way of Scarlet O'Hara. The author lived at the same time period she placed the story and was divorced as well as the main character - so you have to wonder if this is an insight to how divorce was thought of in the different social groups as the time. Had some slow parts, but was a good read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love Edith Wharton books, but this is my favorite by far. The characters are well developed and the story is spell binding if you like that era.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
But a pretty good soap opera. The protagonist, Undine, can be a bit tiresome, but Wharton's handling of her life is pretty clever, especially at the end! I had never heard of this book before reading about it in a recent issue of the New Yorker. That writer said that it was very relevant to the Wall Street shenanigans, consumerism, and divorce in today's society. This claim is largely true, and the book is interesting in that regard.
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