Daily Life in the Hellenistic Age: From Alexander to Cleopatra (Daily Life Through History Series)

Daily Life in the Hellenistic Age: From Alexander to Cleopatra (Daily Life Through History Series)

by James Allan Evans

Paperback

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Overview

Daily Life in the Hellenistic Age: From Alexander to Cleopatra (Daily Life Through History Series) by James Allan Evans

The Hellenistic world, ushered into existence in 323 b.c.e. through the conquests of Alexander the Great, stretched from India in the east to Sicily in the west. Within this vast region, society was multicultural, but the dominant culture was that of the Greeks (who called themselves Hellenes). The Hellenistic Age carried on the legacy of classical Greece in the visual arts, literature, science, technology, religion, and urban daily life.

In Daily Life in the Hellenistic Age, James Allan Evans guides the reader through the vast conquered lands of the shortlived Hellenistic empire and its successor kingdoms. In lively narrative chapters, Evans explores such topics as marriage customs; women in Hellenistic societies; festivals, sports, and spectacles; symposia (drinking parties); the agricultural and commercial components of the polis (city-state); food and drink; education; science and technology; and the legacy of the Hellenistic age in the modern world. This revised and updated paperback edition includes two maps.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780806142555
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
Publication date: 04/06/2012
Series: Greenwood Press Daily Life Through History Series
Pages: 248
Product dimensions: 6.13(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.71(d)
Age Range: 14 - 17 Years

About the Author

James Allan Evans, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Classical, Near Eastern, and Religious Studies, University of British Columbia, is the author or editor of numerous articles and books, including The Power Game in Byzantium: Antonina and
the Empress Theodora and Arts and Humanities through the Eras: Ancient Greece and Rome, 1200 b.c.e.–476 c.e.

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