Daisy's Search for Freedom

Daisy's Search for Freedom

by Bertha Schwartz

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781620208113
Publisher: Emerald House Group, Incorporated
Publication date: 12/01/2018
Series: The Searchers
Pages: 136
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

Bertha Schwartz is a Swiss Amish transplant to the beautiful farmland of Nappanee, Indiana. She loves spending time with family and friends, including fifty-two nieces and nephews. Her hobbies include scrapbooking, sewing, and reading. Raised near the lovely Swiss city of Berne, Indiana, Swiss is her mother-language. Languages and different dialects are a special interest of hers.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

“As a mom to a ten-year-old girl, I am always struggling to find wholesome and educational books for my daughter to read. Daisy’s Search for Freedom is just what I was hoping it would be. Bertha Schwartz carefully spins the tale of a slave girl who is searching for the Underground Railroad with nothing but her faith in God to lead her. The first book in The Searchers series does an excellent job of making history come alive through the eyes of someone my own child’s age. Schwartz does not shy away from uncomfortable topics but does an excellent job at depicting history in a way that is age-appropriate and faith-based. This series is a great way to ignite a love for history in our children while showing them how God has always been and will always be at work in our lives.”
—Katie Cruice Smith
Author of Why Did You Choose Me?

Author of Why Did You Choose Me? - Katie Cruice Smith

“As a mom to a ten-year-old girl, I am always struggling to find wholesome and educational books for my daughter to read. Daisy’s Search for Freedom is just what I was hoping it would be. Bertha Schwartz carefully spins the tale of a slave girl who is searching for the Underground Railroad with nothing but her faith in God to lead her. The first book in The Searchers series does an excellent job of making history come alive through the eyes of someone my own child’s age. Schwartz does not shy away from uncomfortable topics but does an excellent job at depicting history in a way that is age-appropriate and faith-based. This series is a great way to ignite a love for history in our children while showing them how God has always been and will always be at work in our lives.”

Customer Reviews

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Daisy's Search for Freedom 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Laundry_Whispers 17 days ago
I had to sit back and remind myself that this was a middle grade book. I didn’t keep that in mind before I jumped in reading and I found myself getting frustrated that it was all too easy. But in reality it wasn’t. Yes, Daisy and David caught some lucky breaks but that’s not always the reality of these situations. I don’t think that those other situations would find an appropriate audience in the middle grade reader. Set during my favorite period of history, the Civil War, Daisy found a perfect audience in my library. It provided a different view of this time and I think is a perfect addition to the reading material of any reader, reading level aside. Daisy was separated from her family fives years before, until her Mom shows up as the new Cook at Six Oaks Plantation where Daisy lives as a personal slave of a young lady near her age. An entitled and spoiled young lady. A young lady who’s choices and behaviors lead Daisy on her search for freedom. Along her path through the Underground Railroad young Daisy was paired up with another younger boy who was also escaping. I was a little frustrated at the lack of detail on their journey. I feel like even a young reader would get more caught up in the story with more meat to go on. It felt very basic with minimal depth to their actual journey and to their actual emotions on that journey. Each person they met lacked depth as well. They were painted as very good or very bad, for the most part. Even the gray characters left me longing for more about them. Not to give away a lot of spoilers or take away from future readers but I do love a happy ending. During this time period the ratio of happy endings were low. Not all who fled made it out safely. Not all who journeyed arrived. Most didn’t. Not only did Daisy make it out, with a few bumps along the trail, she made it back to what she was looking for all along. I think this is a great book to incorporate into the library of a young reader as an introduction, or even companion, when learning about this historical time period. I am a firm believer that without education and a remembrance of where we have been we are more likely to repeat that history. This is a history that should never be repeated. While this book doesn’t stand alone as an educational piece is does help to broader understanding, child to child. Gravy, even child to adult. Sometimes we need those little reminders that not all who wander are found but with Jesus anything is possible. I was provided a complimentary copy of this book by Just Read. I was not compensated for this review and all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own. I was not required to write a positive review.
PianoLady831 19 days ago
Opening in Alabama during the 1850s, Daisy’s Search for Freedom is a suspenseful, emotional, educational, and inspirational read. It brings history to life for young readers and introduces us to the young slave girl, Daisy, who captured my heart. The author put a lot of care into the writing of this novel, for it touches on the atrocities of slavery without going into great detail or being overly graphic, and is definitely age appropriate for middle-grade readers. I enjoyed this story personally and loved seeing the people of the Underground Railroad in action. Because Daisy had been taught to read, a crime for slaves, she was able to decipher code and pass on messages related to the Underground Railroad. Cruelty was prevalent, but so was kindness and courage. There are several twists and turns, right up to a surprise ending that I loved. Daisy’s courage and simple trust in God are an inspiration for us all. She exemplifies how, with God’s guidance, we can rise to meet a need, doing more than we’re normally capable of. Thought-provoking discussion questions are also provided, making this story an excellent teaching tool. Recommended for readers in the middle grades and also as an educational tool – book reports, home-school curriculum, etc. There are two more books in the Searchers series which are well worth looking into: Kelly’s Search for Family and Sarah’s Search for Treasure. I received a copy of this book through JustRead Tours. The opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.
GratefulGrandma 20 days ago
Daisy’s Search for Freedom by Bertha Schwartz is a wonderful book about the Underground Railroad for young readers. It is the first book in The Searchers series and is a great start. Set in the 1850’s, young Daisy is a slave at the Six Oaks Plantation. She is the personal slave for the daughter of the owner, who is a spoiled and vindictive young woman. When Daisy meets the new cook, she is surprised and excited to see it is her mama. The family was separated years earlier and she had not seen her mama in many years. Her mama lets her know that it is dangerous to let anyone know that they are mother and daughter, so Daisy just calls her Cook, like everyone else does. When Daisy accompanies her young mistress on a family outing to town, she ends up in the crosshairs for a nasty, slave hunter. Having to hide from him, she angers her young mistress, thus putting herself in danger. Being one of a few slaves who knew how to read, a crime, Daisy becomes part of a network of people passing notes with hidden messages. Little does she know that the notes are part of the Underground Railroad. When her turn to escape comes, she hesitantly leaves and is put in charge of a young boy who will accompany her. Thus begins Daisy’s trip on the Underground Railroad. There are some great discussion questions at the end of each chapter to extend knowledge for the reader. Readers can delve deeply into the hatred and ugliness of slavery, that is not fully included in the story. There are a lot of ups and downs in this story with danger around every corner. I love the inclusion of the small gray kitten that seems to be more coonhound than kitten. The author has made this a relatively tame story, but there is inclusion of information such as selling of families, hunger, beatings and slave hunters. While this novel was written for the middle-grades, I enjoyed reading about Daisy’s travels. I can't imagine being a girl her age, and traveling by myself as well as being tasked with protecting a young boy. Daisy is very brave. I recommend Daisy’s Search for Freedom to young readers learning about slavery and the Underground Railroad. There is a very Christian aspect to the story as Daisy prays a lot for protection and guidance, but that was what most of the slaves did at that time so it is very appropriate. I received a copy of this book from Just Reads Publicity in exchange for an honest review. The rating, ideas and opinions shared are my own.
LJShuck 22 days ago
Always on the lookout for wholesome reads for children, Daisy’s Search for Freedom by Bertha Schwartz fits the bill quite nicely. Written for the middle-grades, the first in The Searchers series, is a well-written historical fiction novel. Set in the 1850’s south, young Daisy is a slave Six Oaks Plantation for the daughter of the plantation, a rather spoiled young woman. Learning that the Master has a new cook Daisy is anxious to meet her. To her surprise, Cook turns out to be her very own mama! Daisy hasn’t seen her mama or papa in several years. Daisy is so excited she wants to share the news but her mama cautions her that no one must know and instructs Daisy to call her Cook, just as the other slaves. One day Daisy accompanies her young mistress on a family outing to town. An unfortunate incident puts her directly in sight of the meanest slave hunter in the county. With his eye on Daisy, her life is endangered. Mama is very worried about her safety. Being one of a few slaves who knew how to read, a crime, Daisy becomes part of a network of people passing notes with hidden messages. Little does she know that the notes are part of the Underground Railroad. When a note seems to be referring to her, Daisy lays awake, waiting for someone to come get her. Startled awake, she finds her mama standing by her bed insisting she get up and follow the directions in the note. Having just reunited with her mama, Daisy hesitates but not for long...her life is imminent danger and Daisy must go, now. Thus begins Daisy’s trip on the Underground Railroad. While this novel was written for the middle-grades, I thoroughly enjoyed reading about Daisy’s travels. I tried to imagine being a girl her age, and traveling by myself. Daisy is very brave. I recommend Daisy’s Search for Freedom for both pleasure reading and as a supplemental learning tool.
TheBeccaFiles 5 months ago
Daisy's story is a middle grade historical fiction piece that is age appropriate in content. It introduces kids to the concept of the underground railroad while sparing some of the more harsh realities. Several times the characters are met with situations that more realistically would have resulted in their capture, but instead are met with people that are willing to help them. Young readers become aware of the dangers without having to witness them in the story. For me the writing style lacked some of the flow I would prefer however I would also say it's similar in content to other books for the age-range. The further you go up in reading level the more detail is added into the works and a better flow is created. It's also one that I think will interest kids when they are at the appropriate reading level, but may not hold their attention as they get older simply due to the content and attitude of the characters. When looking at other reviews for this story, others suggest the story for ages 10 and up. In my opinion I think the story would be best between ages 8 and 12. There is a level of optimism and positivity in the story that becomes unrealistic to readers after a certain age and knowledge of history. *I received a copy of this book from the author through JustRead Publicity Tours. Thoughts and opinions expressed are mine alone.