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Dancing in the Glory of Monsters: The Collapse of the Congo and the Great War of Africa
     

Dancing in the Glory of Monsters: The Collapse of the Congo and the Great War of Africa

4.2 14
by Jason K. Stearns
 

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ISBN-10: 1610391071

ISBN-13: 9781610391078

Pub. Date: 03/27/2012

Publisher: PublicAffairs


A Best Book of the Year- The Economist & the Wall Street Journal

At the heart of Africa is the Congo, a country the size of Western Europe, bordering nine other nations, that since 1996 has been wracked by a brutal war in which millions have died. In Dancing in the Glory of Monsters, renowned political activist and researcher Jason K.

Overview


A Best Book of the Year- The Economist & the Wall Street Journal

At the heart of Africa is the Congo, a country the size of Western Europe, bordering nine other nations, that since 1996 has been wracked by a brutal war in which millions have died. In Dancing in the Glory of Monsters, renowned political activist and researcher Jason K. Stearns has written a compelling and deeply-reported narrative of how Congo became a failed state that collapsed into a war of retaliatory massacres. Stearns brilliantly describes the key perpetrators, many of whom he met personally, and highlights the nature of the political system that brought these people to power, as well as the moral decisions with which the war confronted them. Now updated with a new introduction, Dancing in the Glory of Monsters tells the full story of Africa's Great War.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781610391078
Publisher:
PublicAffairs
Publication date:
03/27/2012
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
416
Sales rank:
192,242
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.20(d)

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Dancing in the Glory of Monsters: The Collapse of the Congo and the Great War of Africa 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
philram More than 1 year ago
Well paced, detailed but not overly pedantic, good illustrations of lives ranging from political figures to child soldiers. Wish I had it on my reading list from War College.
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TEST NOOKUSER More than 1 year ago
A conflict few people have heard of and even more who have no clue of the tragedy that took place in the congo, this book really helps the reader understand the background of the conflict that was a geneocide which the whole world ignored.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Dave_Donelson More than 1 year ago
If you want to understand the tragedy that is the Congo, put aside the mythology and read Dancing In The Glory of Monsters. Jason Stearns has untangled the snarling mess that is the history of this sad nation. As someone who's researched and written about the Congo myself (Heart Of Diamonds: A novel of scandal, love, and death in the Congo), I found new insights into the interminable conflicts that have wracked the country for it's entire modern history. Stearns delineates the players, putting them into context and showing how they interacted to make the Congo what it is today. He clearly explains the role of Rwanda's Paul Kagame and other outsiders in the turmoil, but also delineates the power hunger and shortcomings of the Congo's own leaders, including current President Joseph Kabila. Most importantly, Stearns demonstrates that there is no one single cause of the Congo's troubles. He calmly shows how tribal rivalries fuel the strife just as much as the struggle to control the country's mineral wealth. He explains how the internal politics of Zimbabwe, Uganda, Angola, and other countries in addition to Rwanda led to their deep involvement in the DRC's wars. While he rightfully deplores the epidemic of rape in the Congo, he puts it in context and doesn't dwell on it--not because it's not important, but because there's more to the story. I found it refreshing that Stearns resists the impulse to blame rapacious multinational corporations for much of anything except trying to find a way to do business in the Congo. He doesn't ignore the many shortcomings of most of the deals to exploit the Congo's riches, but correctly points out that most of them were struck by Congolese leaders eager to fund their own ambitions. He leaves the conspiracy theories to other, less informed writers. Dancing In The Glory Of Monsters is an objective, clear-eyed look at one of the greatest ongoing tragedies in modern history.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read the book when I was flying on a international flight.