Dancing with Eternity

Dancing with Eternity

by John Patrick Lowrie

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781603818124
Publisher: Epicenter Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 08/18/2011
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 418
File size: 800 KB

About the Author

John Patrick Lowrie was born in 1952 in Honolulu, Hawaii, and raised in Boulder, Colorado. At sixteen he left home to make his way as a singer/guitarist/flautist/trombonist in a rock ‘n’ roll band, sleeping in parks and communes and getting to know several hippies. After surviving the draft, he graduated with highest distinction from the Indiana University School of Music and for a few years managed to make a living as a composer and guitarist in his acoustic fusion duo, The Kiethe Lowrie Duet, garnering critical acclaim and opening for people who were much more famous than he was. He then decided to become an actor because the pay was better and the work was steadier. To this day he remains the only person he knows of who has done this. He met Ellen McLain, his wife of twenty-four years, in Arnhem, Holland, on a European tour of a Broadway show and started his acting career in Palermo, Italy, telling jokes to an opera house full of Sicilians who didn’t speak English. Success continues to dog his heels like an angry Pekinese. He and his wife now reside in Seattle where they divide their professional time between acting in live theater and voice-acting for computer games and radio dramas.

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Dancing with Eternity 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
loomiebin More than 1 year ago
this book, from new author john patrick lowrie, is a page turner. not only does it succeed in its genre of science fiction, it is a multi layered treat, delving into ethics, morality, quantem physics, and love with insight and humor. this is such a page turner that i finished it in less than two days. my only hope is that lowry puts out another book soon, because he is an author with great skills and a strong voice.
harstan More than 1 year ago
On Vesper the third moon of Golgotha, the SRS informs Mohandas the actor that his scales are not considered a deduction and therefor he owes the government 4000 DCU. Not having the money, Lizard as the patrons call Mo is stuck in the jungle city of New Spanaway on a backwater world instead of heading to Heaven with the troupe. At a dive, a woman takes an interest in Mo. He assumes she is a System Revenue Service field agent arriving to collect or a Planetary Tectonics agent ready to kick him off the dole and into the dangerous "Works". Steel is neither as she offers him a position on her starship F.S. Lightdancer. Though he does not quite understand his duties, he accepts the opportunity to escape paradise. Thus begins the odyssey of Steel and Mo as they head roundabout to the most dangerous sector of the universe Brainard's Planet with stops at Earth, Circe and Eden; their quest is simply to save humanity. Dancing with Eternity is a complex, cerebral, yet exciting science fiction thriller that extrapolates present day trends to what could be in a couple of millennia. The story line can feel convoluted as the audience learns of the past lives of the protagonists while touring the universe with the pair and the crew. Starting with the first encounter in a dive that will feels like Rick's Bar in Casablanca, fans who relish something different in their futuristic outer space adventures will want to read John Patrick Lowrie's entertaining braining up Dancing with Eternity. Harriet Klausner
PghDragonMan on LibraryThing 7 months ago
I'll just get right to it. My biggest complaint with Dancing with Eternity was the disconnect between the sexual politics and the Sci-Fi aspect of the book. Not that the two can't go together, I just could not decide which side the author was on: men are overly aggressive and to be blamed for all the wars that have been fought versus women are just as aggressive and every bit as much to blame for the state of the Universe in this 40th Century. Take a stand, make your case and let the reader figure out if your right, don't prevaricate. It is better to fail to convince your readers than to waffle all over the place.Because the author could not seem to take a stand, some of the debates between the lead characters were too long winded and did not really serve to advance the plot. Less annoying, the relationship between two of the female leads was obvious, right from the start. I hate spoiled surprises, but it fit the plot nicely, so it was not as detracting.One of the more intriguing things was the overall flavor of the narrator's choice of words and metaphors. Despite this being a Sci-Fi offering, at time I almost felt I was in a high tech Crime Noir story. Maybe it had to do with the beautiful sexy female lead, Steel, finding the main male lead, Mo, in a bar. Steel puts all the classic moves on Mo and Mo responds with all the classic lines.Overall, I can buy into this future, I just don't know if I want to live there. The science is plausible, but highly improbable, as are the history lessons we get along the way. While it is worth more than the effort involved in reading this book, I don;t think it will go on to become a classic of the Sci-Fi genre. I'll go a little above average for this one at three and a half stars.
m4marya on LibraryThing 7 months ago
This book was entertaining. I found some of the opinions about feminism to be a bit heavy handed and slightly out of place, when compared with the tone of the rest of the book. I was able to ignore this part of it and enjoy the rest of the story. As I was reading it I felt like I was reading a science fiction novel from an earlier era, one that attempted to imagine how society would change but could not really imagine the loss of that era's morals and values. So, it felt a bit old-fashioned to me. It was an interesting mix of cultures, religions and personalities.
MadsKofoed on LibraryThing 7 months ago
It is not the best science fiction book written, but i did like it, and i would recommend it for people who want a humourous reading. It is a story combining action and discusssion problems of immortality and life and religion. I was captivated and read in two settings, so good was it. Good basic sciencefiction, with a humourous twist.
viking2917 on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Dancing with Eternity is a first novel by John Patrick Lowrie. It's the far distant future and people mostly no longer die. Their memories and personality are constantly uploaded to a central storage area, and if one's body should fail, the personality is simply re-downloaded into a new one. As a side effect, there are no children, no permanent marriages or monogamy, and people are effectively immortal. As a result, most people have done many things, held many roles, lived on many planets. Our hero Mohandas ("Mo") is one of the oldest of the immortals, although he does not disclose that to those he knows. The novel starts with a bit of a cliche'd sci-fi noir opening - our down and out hero Mo is in a bar when a stunning woman comes in - albeit one with cat's eyes and head-to-toe fur, who makes straight for our hero, and proceeds to involve him in mysterious goings-on. Steel is the Captain of the starship LightDancer. Mo become powerfully attracted to Steel and quickly joins her crew and is outbound for another planet. Dancing with Eternity strong echoes Richard Morgan's amazing Altered Carbon, which explores the concept of downloading people into new bodies. Altered Carbon explores it in greater variety (e.g. gender reversal) and has a much more sharply defined central mystery. It's much darker than Dancing with Eternity, and the sex in Dancing with Eternity is mostly implied, in contrast to Morgan's explicitness. Dancing also echoes a lot of Heinlein, so lovers of "adventure science fiction" will enjoy it. The internal world building is good, and the future history as presented in the novel is entirely plausible. In particular the effect of being immortal on one's personality is explored at length. I found Lowrie's evocation of that not nearly as compelling as, for example, the depth of character of Lazarus Long in Time Enough for Love. I also found the back half of the book to be too much "they went there they did this" recitation - the plot tension and pacing was lost somewhat and the central mystery of the novel elongated unnecessarily. All in all it's a very good first novel - not as strong as Altered Carbon, or, say, Neuromancer, which set the bar for first-time science fiction authors, but still a fine outing and an enjoyable read. [I received a copy of Dancing with Eternity as part of LibraryThing's Early Reviewer program.]
EmScape on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Epic. Mesmerizing. Poignant. Suspenseful. Thought-provoking.Mo is stranded in a backwater planet, basically just drinking his way through his 18th lifetime, when he is approached by Steel, a gorgeous woman who offers him the opportunity to join her mysterious mission, and get off this planet. With full medical! Mo agrees, but details about the mission are not immediately forthcoming. They dribble out over the book with such rightness and evenhandedness; Mo learns necessary information when it becomes necessary for both him and the reader. This serves to keep the reader intrigued and guessing Steel's motivations, and what they hope to accomplish. Did I mention this takes place in the 40th century? They have virtual immortality thanks to a procedure called "re-booting", and Faster Than Light travel, which really opens up the possibilities for this narrative, and the author definitely took advantage of them. The journey spans the galaxy and probably about a century, and manages to be both fascinating and fast paced.I loved it. I kind of want to read it again, now that I know how it ends.
aethercowboy on LibraryThing 7 months ago
John Patrick Lowrie, probably best known for his voice acting roles in various modern video games, is, as it turns out, also an author. Lowrie, in his debut novel, Dancing With Eternity, proves that not only can he act, but he also has the literary skills to write, the knowledge of scientific principles to make it seem realistic, and the understanding of the genre to make it work.The story takes place in a distant future, where people ¿re-boot¿ when they get too old, getting a second (or third, or fourth, or fifth, or ¿) chance at youth. The narrator, Mohandas, meets with a mysterious ship¿s captain named Steel, who offers him a crew position on her ship. Down on his luck Mohandas, one of the oldest people in the known universe, is happy to accept, but soon realizes that Steel has more secrets than she lets on, and is forced to tag along on her quest that threatens the lives of the otherwise immortal humans at her side.I must admit that Lowrie writes readable fiction that is well plotted and evenly paced. The story flows from the words, and the words take you on an intergalactic journey through the cosmos. Not once does it feel rushed, nor does it feel like he couldn¿t figure out what to do next. The story naturally unfolds from the beginning, and ties up nicely at the end.My only issue with the story was that it seemed somewhat influenced, on some level, by Heinlein, whose writings I don¿t particularly like. Other than that, it¿s a solid story bound to be enjoyed by the fans of many types of science fiction.
ljbryant on LibraryThing 7 months ago
If you read this book as a strictly futuristic adventure novel, you will probably be slightly disappointed. There are elements of the plot that are built up throughout the story, only to be anticlimactically abandoned. The characters in the story, rather than being idealized exemplars of perfection, are very human -- but in a way that readers may find difficulty connecting with, since they are humans living in a vastly different culture brought on by certain very important aspects of technology.If, however, you read it as a study of the mores and ethics of the society that would be formed from advanced, periodic, and above all EXPENSIVE geriatric treatment that provides virtual immortality, you will, like me, probably be amazed. The true theme, and the true strength, of this book, is expressed right in the title. It isn't about the quest, or the danger, or the adventure -- it is about how humanity would change given the ability to reverse aging, overcome death, and travel to the stars with ease.
irapearson on LibraryThing 7 months ago
I actually liked the back-cover blurb. The Odysseus-meets-Ahab bit, in particular, was what made me request this book from the early reviewer list. I'd say that's a fairly apt and concise description and the novel was interesting enough, but, somehow, ultimately disappointing. First, I had no real emotional connection to any of the characters, including Mohandas, the main character. While this is not a deal breaker, it is unfortunate. Second, the central mystery and dire threat of Brainard's Planet and the Plague, set up over the course of the first 31 chapters, is unceremoniously dumped near the end of the novel, with no real resolution, aside from an offhand joke about orgasms. I wouldn't call it anticlimactic, but it certainly wasn't all that it should have been.
Sander314 on LibraryThing 7 months ago
It's the future, almost nobody dies, and people have an unhealthy obsession with changes that happened since the 20th/21th century. Nothing new for a SF book. Indeed the book starts out as a seemingly normal space opera, except that the both the FTL drive and the galactic internet seem to be powered by concentrated hippie ('human brains are so special they require special physics that allows for everything we need to magically happen'). When the characters end up on Eden, the planet where people still choose to die, the characters and events seem to become little more than a way for the author to give his opinion on what things immortality would do to society. There is also a subplot about a gender war, which again seems to be little more than an excuse to give his theories about feminism and gender roles.The Brainard mission is definitely the better subplot, with some very interesting discoveries, but in the end it cuts off rather abruptly to go back to Eden and talk some more.meh/5 stars.
cindysous More than 1 year ago
great characters, lots of adventure, smart dialogue, thought provoking social issues...excellent!
Cat-in-Carolina More than 1 year ago
Warning: this is not a common fantasy book about a dim witted female torn between two perfect immortal males. It is science fiction, not fantasy fluff - real science fiction and I liked it a lot. I read the book because I am a fan of John Patrick Lowrie as a voice actor, and I'm glad I did.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book took a couple chapters to get going as it set the storyline and background, but after the initial set-up, it kept me on the edge of my seat, wanting to read more. The storytelling is very solid and flows well, while surprising you with unexpected twists. It is a bit long, but well worth the read.
improvmaven More than 1 year ago
You will really enjoy this thought provoking adventure that takes you across time and space. Mohandis, the hero / narrator tells the story of a future where death is banished, religion is non-existent, and the economy of the universe is a complicated trade-off of slave labor and freedom, depending on what lifetime you're talking about. It weaves in thought provoking ideas of life and death, religious belief and what must do to survive immortality. It's a well thought out, adventure that goes from planet to planet and galaxy to galaxy.
lilyfyrestorm More than 1 year ago
Epic. Mesmerizing. Poignant. Suspenseful. Thought-provoking. Mo is stranded in a backwater planet, basically just drinking his way through his 18th lifetime, when he is approached by Steel, a gorgeous woman who offers him the opportunity to join her mysterious mission, and get off this planet. With full medical! Mo agrees, but details about the mission are not immediately forthcoming. They dribble out over the book with such rightness and evenhandedness; Mo learns necessary information when it becomes necessary for both him and the reader. This serves to keep the reader intrigued and guessing Steel's motivations, and what they hope to accomplish. Did I mention this takes place in the 40th century? They have virtual immortality thanks to a procedure called "re-booting", and Faster Than Light travel, which really opens up the possibilities for this narrative, and the author definitely took advantage of them. The journey spans the galaxy and probably about a century, and manages to be both fascinating and fast paced. I loved it. I kind of want to read it again, now that I know how it ends.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
In Johns book Dancing With Eternity, you will find that calling this book imaginative is an understatement. The characters are of a depth that you can connect to them, or at least relate to them on a fundamental level. And the perspective of following the main character "Mo" or Mohandas ties you in and allows you to feel anchored as a member of the crew. Combine that with a healthy dose of humor, antics, and the envy that they can release their tension in a ways we never thought of without risk, and you have a really great book. This is a book you have to really read and follow with a careful eye, because if you blink you will miss out. But its worth every moment that it takes to read it and when your done you will find yourself realizing that imagination truly can go to the ends of the universe.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago