Dancing with the Devil: Confessions of an Undercover Agent

Dancing with the Devil: Confessions of an Undercover Agent

by Louis Diaz, Neal Hirschfeld
4.4 8

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Dancing with the Devil 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is fast-moving and full of interesting details about the life of an undercover cop (vice and drugs, mostly, and mostly in NY in the 1960s, 70s and 80s) that are interesting and nerve-racking. Diaz is a good guy who grew up as a poor and hyper-responsible (he watched over a younger brother, who was epileptic) immigrant kid in scary, tough neighborhoods of Brooklyn. Hair-raising neighborhood events helped steel his nerves for his future life among truly dangerous gangsters and thugs. Diaz is retired from police work now, and has a new life as an actor in California -- but in this story, as told to Neal Hirschfeld, a crime writer, he paints a full picture of the life he led as well as what got him to become a detective. He's all about fighting for good, but without cliches. I learned a lot about undercover work -- the excitement and the tedium of it -- and about the minds of criminals, too. Highly recommended. A quick read that stays with you for a long time afterwards.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I heard about Louie Diaz one night on NPR and was quick to download his book with high expectations for an exciting story about the ups and downs of life as an undercover cop/agent. Unfortunately, once I began reading, I was often put off by his bragging and recurring theme of "boy hero in the face of adversity". He gives credit to his partners and fellow agents in a way that almost feels false, as if he knows he should acknowledge them but has such a high opinion of himself that any recognition given to them seems insincere. He mentions his own faults and short-comings but quickly reminds the reader that he should be allowed this and more due to his troubled upbringing. To be fair, he did lead a difficult life and did some amazing things for our country and the war on drugs, but I only wish he could have found a humbler voice to tell the story. In the end I was more aggravated and eager to finish the book, rather than left with the appreciation that Louie Diaz clearly expects from the reader.
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