ISBN-10:
0262621800
ISBN-13:
2900262621808
Pub. Date:
08/11/2003
Publisher:
MIT Press
Dark Fiber: Tracking Critical Internet Culture

Dark Fiber: Tracking Critical Internet Culture

by Geert Lovink

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 2900262621808
Publisher: MIT Press
Publication date: 08/11/2003
Series: Electronic Culture: History, Theory, and Practice
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 394
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author


Geert Lovink is an independent media theorist and net critic. He is the founder of nettime mailing lists, a member of Adilkno, and a cofounder of the online community server Digital City.


Timothy Druckrey is an independent curator and writer and editor of Ars Electronica: Facing the Future (MIT Press, 1999). He lectures internationally on the social impact of digital media, the transformations of representation, and communication in interactive and networked environments.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgementsviii
Introduction: Twilight of the Digirati2
Theory
Essay on Speculative Media Theory (1996)22
Portrait of the Virtual Intellectual (1997)30
Case Studies
The Digital City--Metaphor and Community (2001)42
The Moderation Question: Nettime and the Boundaries of Mailing List Culture (2001)68
Crystals of Net Criticism
Language? No Problem (1996)122
A Push Media Critique (1997)130
Mass Psychology of the Net: A Proposal (1998)136
Net. Times, Not Swatch Time: 21st-Century Global Time Wars (1998)142
Fragments of Network Criticism (1999)160
Sweet Erosions of Email (2000)176
Travelogues
Culture after the Final Breakdown: Tirana, Albania, May 1998 (1998)182
The 9/21 Aftershocks: Taiwan, December 1999 (1999)194
At the Opening of New Media Centre Sarai: Delhi, February 2001 (2001)204
Dynamics of Net Culture
Radical Media Pragmatism (1998)218
Network Fears and Desires (1998)226
An Early History of 1990s Cyberculture (1999)234
The Importance of Meetspace: On Conferences and Temporary Media Labs (2000)240
An Insider's Guide to Tactical Media (2001)254
Reality Check
Organized Innocence and War in the New Europe: Adilkno, Culture, and the Independent Media (1995)276
Soros and the NGO Question, or The Art of Being Independent (1997)296
Information Warfare: From Propaganda Critique to Culture Jamming (1998)306
Kosovo: War in the Age of Internet (1999)318
Towards a Political Economy
Cyberculture in the Dotcom Age (2000)330
The Rise and Fall of Dotcom Mania (2001)348
Hi-Low: The Bandwidth Dilemma, or Internet Stagnation after Dotcom Mania (2001)370
Bibliography380

What People are Saying About This

Mark Dery

Remember the future? Geert Lovink comes not to praise, but to bury, the 'techno mysticism and digital Darwinism' that fogged our vision in the 1990s. The preeminent practitioner of Net criticism (a discourse he co-founded), Lovink combines a no-bullshit street wisdom acquired in his days as a squatter with a bear-trap intellect honed on postmodern theory and endless late-night debates. Geert Lovink is the Linus Torvald of open-source theory—a free-agent thinker cracking the cultural code that cages our minds. Where he leads, I follow.

Lev Manovich

For over a decade now, Lovink has been one of the most prominent figures in cyberculture and new media worldwide. A new-media theorist, an Internet critic, an activist, an inventor of new innovative forms of net-based discourse, an organizer of ground-breaking events—remarkably, he excels at all these different roles. I think of Lovink as a network of distributed sensors: everywhere at once, he is always the first to notice new changing directions of net culture, the first to name them, and the first to offer sober and illuminating analysis. Now we are fortunate to have his brilliant dispatches from the net front collected in one book. This is a new kind of book from a new type of public intellectual. Think of it as theory on-the-go—or as a set of help files to keep handy as you navigate the present, on- and off-line.

Peter Lunenfeld

Lovink is our major thinker about the intersections of tactical media, net criticism, and the social design of technology. Dark Fiber is a sterling work of radical pragmitism, the essays within pointing to a better and yes, possible, future for netowork societies.

Endorsement

A brilliant archeology of the world of new media by one of its longtime activists and theorists. Lovink's knowledge of technology, extensive participation in multiple grassroots initiatives, and critical politics give him a perspective on the subject that is unlike that of any other author I know.

Saskia Sassen, University of Chicago, author of Globalization and Its Discontents

From the Publisher

A brilliant archeology of the world of new media by one of its longtime activists and theorists. Lovink's knowledge of technology, extensive participation in multiple grassroots initiatives, and critical politics give him a perspective on the subject that is unlike that of any other author I know.

Saskia Sassen, University of Chicago, author of Globalization and Its Discontents

Saskia Sassen

A brilliant archeology of the world of new media by one of its longtime activists and theorists. Lovink's knowledge of technology, extensive participation in multiple grassroots initiatives, and critical politics give him a perspective on the subject that is unlike that of any other author I know.

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