Dark Graphic Tales by Edgar Allan Poe

Dark Graphic Tales by Edgar Allan Poe

Hardcover(Library Binding)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780766040861
Publisher: Enslow Publishers, Incorporated
Publication date: 08/01/2012
Series: Dark Graphic Novels
Pages: 96
Product dimensions: 6.96(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.54(d)
Lexile: GN730L (what's this?)
Age Range: 10 - 14 Years

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Dark Graphic Tales by Edgar Allan Poe 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What does a legend about pirates and buried treasure, a twisted tale about a trip to an insane asylum and a scary story about two siblings all have in common? They were all written by, none other than the master of dark tales himself, Edgar Allen Poe. A graphic representation of these stories can be found in the book, Dark Graphic Tales by Edgar Allen Poe, adaptation by Denise Despeyroux with brilliant illustrations by Miquel Serratosa. The book begins with the story of “The Gold Bug”, a magical artifact with a dark history that could lead to treasures or ruins for the person who finds it. The next, “The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether”, is a horrifying tale of an insane asylum where the patients are free to roam and the guards are nowhere to be found. Finally, the third tale in this collection is a Poe classic, “The Fall of the House of Usher”, where a visitor witnesses a sad and mysterious situation between siblings in their strange house. This graphic novel is an excellent choice for struggling or reluctant readers as illustrator, Miquel Serratosa brings each ghastly tale to life through gripping illustrations. The stories are well organized and pages easy to follow in their graphic design. A must-have for new and old Edgar Allen Poe fans! Enslow Publishers provided me with a complimentary copy of this book, Dark Graphic Tales by Edgar Allen Poe ISBN 978-0-7660-4086-1.
Sandy5 More than 1 year ago
These were supposed to be Dark Graphic Tales according to the cover but I thought otherwise. Perhaps I went in with high expectations but these three stories fell short for me and they were far from spooky, evil or mysterious. I thought The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether was rather comical. As the guests around the table discussed the patients they once had, I was laughing for these individuals really not only talked about it but some of the them were acting out the part. The panels were wonderfully illustrated as the characters performed for each, as the others around the table added their own remarks. It was the final page of this story, that sealed the deal and made me revisit this story a second time. The Gold Bug was a long drawn out story which finally got interesting when Legrand reveals how he unravels the mystery behind all the clues that he discovered to his friend and Jupiter. How Legrand put this all together was amazing and surprised the heck out of me. The last story was The Fall of the House of Usher and there was really nothing in this story that I enjoyed except the full-page illustration of Roderick’s sister. This page made a statement and was warranted at this time in the novel, it wrapped up the story nicely. I didn’t like a majority of the faces that were illustrated in the novel, many of them looked droopy and some of them looked as if they had been stung by bees (all bloaty and dimply). I enjoyed the text font that was used as I think it showed the age of this script. I was hoping to read this novel to a class of sixth graders and now, I am still debating this option. Since graphic novels are a popular choice amongst this age group I was hoping to show them some of Poe’s work but I am wondering if they would understand it. Perhaps I would have to read it to them a couple times for them to fully comprehend it. I know that I appreciated it more when I read it through a second time.