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Database Modeling and Design: Logical Design / Edition 5
     

Database Modeling and Design: Logical Design / Edition 5

by Toby J. Teorey
 

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ISBN-10: 0123820200

ISBN-13: 9780123820204

Pub. Date: 02/24/2011

Publisher: Elsevier Science

Database systems and database design technology have seen significant changes in recent years. The relational data model and relational database systems dominate applications; in turn, they are extended by other technologies like data warehousing, OLAP, and data mining. Businesses are expanding and require well-constructed databases to track their new and various

Overview

Database systems and database design technology have seen significant changes in recent years. The relational data model and relational database systems dominate applications; in turn, they are extended by other technologies like data warehousing, OLAP, and data mining. Businesses are expanding and require well-constructed databases to track their new and various needs. How do you model and design your database application in the event of new technology or new business needs?

The answers are all in the fifth edition of Database Modeling and Design: Logical Design. This book shows you how to develop data modeling concepts and logical database design consistently over a wide scope in a way that will support the needs of your enterprise. Updated clear explanations, in-depth detail, real-world examples, and illustrative case studies provide you with practical advice that you can count on—with design rules that are applicable to any SQL-based system.

NEW to this edition:

• NEW- A whole chapter devoted to XML and web databases. What you need to know to utilize XML rather than relational tables.

• A whole chapter describing Object Relational Design. Learn how to make a choice between what is in the database as a BLOB and what is outside in a separate file.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780123820204
Publisher:
Elsevier Science
Publication date:
02/24/2011
Series:
Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
1,322,320
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

Database Modeling & Design: The Fundamental Principles, Second Edition
by Toby J. Teorey
    Chapter 1 Introduction
      1.1 Data and Database Management
      1.2 Data Modeling and the Entity-Relationship Approach
      1.3 The Database Life Cycle
      1.4 Summary
      Literature Summary

    Chapter 2 The ER Model: Basic Concepts
      2.1 Fundamental ER Constructs
        2.1.1 Basic Objects: Entities, Relationships, Attributes
        2.1.2 Degree of a Relationship
        2.1.3 Connectivity and Cardinality of a Relationship
        2.1.4 Attributes of a Relationship
        2.1.5 Existence of an Entity in a Relationship
        2.1.6 Alternative ER Notations
      2.2 Advanced ER Constructs
        2.2.1 Generalization: Supertypes and Subtypes
        2.2.2 Aggregation
        2.2.3 Ternary Relationships
        2.2.4 General n-ary Relationships
        2.2.5 ER Constraints: Extensions from the NIAM Model
        2.2.6 Entity Integrity, Referential Integrity, and ID Dependency
      2.3 Object-Oriented Data Modeling
        2.3.1 Object-Oriented Concepts
        2.3.2 Object Modeling Versus ER Modeling
      2.4 Summary
      Literature Summary
      Exercises

    Chapter 3 ER Modeling in Logical Database Design
      3.1 Introduction
      3.2 Requirements Analysis and ER Modeling
        3.2.1 Classify Entities and Attributes
        3.2.2 Identify the Generalization Hierarchies
        3.2.3 Define Relationships
        3.2.4 Example of ER Modeling: Company Personnel and Project Database
      3.3 View Integration
        3.3.1 Preintegration Analysis
        3.3.2 Comparison of Schemas
        3.3.3 Conformation of Schemas
        3.3.4 Merging and Restructuring of Schemas
        3.3.5 Example of View Integration
      3.4 Entity Clustering
        3.4.1 Clustering Concepts
        3.4.2 Grouping Operations
        3.4.3 Clustering Technique
      3.5 Summary
      Literature Summary
      Exercises

    Chapter 4 Transformation of the ER Model to SQL
      4.1 Transformation Rules and SQL Constructs
        4.1.1 Binary Relationships
        4.1.2 Binary Recursive Relationships
        4.1.3 Ternary and n-ary Relationships
        4.1.4 Generalization and Aggregation
        4.1.5 Multiple Relationships
        4.1.6 Weak Entities
      4.2 Transformation Steps
        4.2.1 Entity Transformation
        4.2.2 Many-to-Many Binary Relationship Transformation
        4.2.3 Ternary Relationship Transformation
        4.2.4 Example of ER-to-SQL Transformation
      4.3 Summary
      Literature Summary
      Exercises

    Chapter 5 Normalization
      5.1 Fundamentals of Normalization
        5.1.1 First Normal Form
        5.1.2 Superkeys, Candidate Keys, and Primary Keys
        5.1.3 Second Normal Form
        5.1.4 Third Normal Form
        5.1.5 Boyce-Codd Normal Form
      5.2 The Design of Normalized Tables: A Simple Example
      5.3 Normalization of Candidate Tables Derived from ER Diagrams
      5.4 Determining the Minimum Set of 3NF Tables
        5.4.1 Elimination of Extraneous Attributes
        5.4.2 Search for a Nonredundant Cover
        5.4.3 Partitioning of the Nonredundant Cover
        5.4.4 Merge of Equivalent Keys
        5.4.5 Nonredundant Cover Again and Definition of Tables
      5.5 Fourth and Fifth Normal Forms
        5.5.1 Multivalued Dependencies
        5.5.2 Fourth Normal from
        5.5.3 Decomposing Tables to 4NF
        5.5.4 Fifth Normal Form
      5.6 Summary
      Literature Summary
      Exercises

    Chapter 6 Access Methods
      6.1 Sequential Files
        6.1.1 Sequential Processing for an Entire File
        6.1.2 Sequential Processing for a Single Record
        6.1.3 Batch Processing of k Records
      6.2 Random Files
        6.2.1 Hashing
        6.2.2 B-Trees and B+-trees
      6.3 Secondary Indices
      6.4 Usage Refinement or Denormalization of Logical Databases
      6.5 Table Usage Refinement Algorithm
      6.6 Join Strategies
      6.7 Summary
      Literature Summary
      Exercises

    Chapter 7 An Example of Relational Database Design
      7.1 Requirement Specification
      7.2 Logical Design
      7.3 Physical Design
        7.3.1 Schema Refinement Based on Usage
        7.3.2 Index Selection Problem
      7.4 Summary

    Chapter 8 Data Allocation Strategies
      8.1 Introduction
      8.2 Distributed and Multidatabase Design
        8.2.1 Fragmentation
        8.2.2 Data Allocation
      8.3 The General Data Allocation Problem
      8.4 Data Allocation Strategies
      8.5 Summary
      Literature Summary
      Exercises

    Chapter 9 Optimal Distributed Data Allocation
      9.1 A distributed Database Design Problem
        9.1.1 Database Description
        9.1.2 Database Transactions
        9.1.3 Network and Local Site Specifications
      9.2 Global Schema and Fragmentation Design
        9.2.1 Analysis of the Transactions
        9.2.2 Global Schema Design Decisions
        9.2.3 Normalization of the Global Schema
        9.2.4 Fragmentation and Nonredundant Allocation
      9.3 Redundant Data Allocation Methods
        9.3.1 Cost/Benefit Analysis: Basic Performance Statistics
        9.3.2 Exhaustive Enumeration Method
        9.3.3 All Beneficial Sites Method
        9.3.4 Variations of All Beneficial Sites
      9.4 Summary
      Literature Summary
      Exercises

    Chapter 10 Database Dependability
      10.1 Introduction
      10.2 Availability
      10.3 Reliability
        10.3.1 Example 1: Query Reliability for a Simple Distributed Database
        10.3.2 Example 2: Trade-offs Between Performance and Reliability
      10.4 Mean Transaction completion Time
      10.5 Summary
      Literature Summary
      Exercises

    Appendix A Review of SQL
      A.1 SQL Names and Operators
      A.2 Data Definition Language (DDL)
      A.3 Data Manipulation Language (DML)
        A.3.1 SQL Select Command
        A.3.2 SQL Update Commands
        A.3.3 Referential Integrity
        A.3.4 SQL Views
      Literature Summary
      Exercises

    Appendix B Database Performance Tuning
      B.1 User-Defined Parameters
      B.2 Database Administrator and System Defined Parameters
      Literature Summary
    References
    Solutions to Selected Exercises
    Index

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