Daughter of the Burning City

Daughter of the Burning City

by Amanda Foody

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Overview

Daughter of the Burning City by Amanda Foody

A darkly irresistible new fantasy set in the infamous Gomorrah Festival, a traveling carnival of debauchery that caters to the strangest of dreams and desires 

Sixteen-year-old Sorina has spent most of her life within the smoldering borders of the Gomorrah Festival. Yet even among the many unusual members of the traveling circus-city, Sorina stands apart as the only illusion-worker born in hundreds of years. This rare talent allows her to create illusions that others can see, feel and touch, with personalities all their own. Her creations are her family, and together they make up the cast of the Festival's Freak Show. 

But no matter how lifelike they may seem, her illusions are still just that—illusions, and not truly real. Or so she always believed…until one of them is murdered. 

Desperate to protect her family, Sorina must track down the culprit and determine how they killed a person who doesn't actually exist. Her search for answers leads her to the self-proclaimed gossip-worker Luca. Their investigation sends them through a haze of political turmoil and forbidden romance, and into the most sinister corners of the Festival. But as the killer continues murdering Sorina's illusions one by one, she must unravel the horrifying truth before all her loved ones disappear.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781488015465
Publisher: Harlequin
Publication date: 07/25/2017
Sold by: HARLEQUIN
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 108,037
File size: 4 MB
Age Range: 14 - 17 Years

About the Author

Amanda Foody has always considered imagination to be our best attempt at magic. After spending her childhood longing to attend Hogwarts, she now loves to write about immersive settings and characters grappling with insurmountable destinies. She holds a master's in accountancy from Villanova University and a bachelor of arts in English literature from the College of William and Mary.

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Daughter of the Burning City 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Aditi-ATWAMB More than 1 year ago
“Sin is our arsenal. It is through the very depravity of Gomorrah that we fight wars of righteousness.” I heard NOTHING but great things before I dove into Amanda Foody’s debut novel for months before I actually picked it up and dove in. A book about actual illusions ACTUALLY being murdered – shall we give it about 800 points of originality? I don’t know why it took me so long to start reading the book and then the better part of a week to actually get through it but Daughter of the Burning City wasn’t everything I thought it would be, and I HAVE SO MANY THOUGHTS: 1. The first thing that threw me about this book was the pure INFORMATION DUMP that happened at the beginning. There were so many character names abilities and names being thrown my way, then the geographical structure and political machinations of a MOVING CITY/ FESTIVAL as well a continent always at war? SO MUCH INFORMATION THAT I WAS BASICALLY DROWNING. 2. The opening scene of this book was about Sorina and her illusions and their Freak Show Circus and I didn’t get to know any of them AT ALL much less care for them before the first murder. This resulted in me being apathetic because I had about TWO scenes with this character (most of which I spent confused) and so this book didn’t shock me/ make me feel ANYTHING. 3. Like I said in the beginning, this book deserves ALL THE POINTS for originality. It was like nothing I’d ever read before with not a single trope overlapping from another book and I REALLY LOVED THAT. 4. While I spend most of the first half of the book CONFUSED and disconnected, I slowly began warming up to everyone and everything in the book as we went deeper into Amanda Foody’s dark world and more secrets about the Illusions, the politics and jynx-work was revealed. It was dark, twisted and dangerous and I loved every second of it. 5. While I initially didn’t care for them, Sorina’s family and Luca grew on me that by the time I closed the book, I’D FALLEN IN LOVE WITH ALL OF THEM. I loved the last chapter with the Freak Show and it was such a dark and happy book. 6. If you can’t already tell, I WAS A BUNDLE OF CONFLICTING EMOTIONS throughout the course of the book. I was confused and apathetic and then everything cleared up and I fell in love. I just wish the world building had been better and all of it wasn’t just dumped on me which made me contemplate not continuing on with this book. A dark, dangerous, intriguing tale that deserves ALL THE POINTS for originality. 3 stars.
ahyperboliclife More than 1 year ago
3.75 Stars “I’ve always preferred change to tradition.” Daughter of the Burning City was such a fantastically dark fantasy filled with interesting characters with questionable motives. We follow Sorina, an illusion-worker who operates the festival’s freak show with her Illusion crafted family. But when some of her illusions are found dead, Sorina teams up with the mysterious Luca to find answers; searching through the underbelly of the festival. Things I Liked The tone and atmosphere of Gomorrah was so perfect. The underhandedness, the thievery, the overall grey and amoral vibes were so perfect, especially as a Halloween read. I really liked Sorina’s illusions. They were all really interesting characters, and I loved that we got to know them independently, not just extensions of her. I also thought the character profiles for the “freaks” was awesome and I loved seeing them, especially with the morbid note from the killer. I thought how the illusions operated was clever and compelling. I really liked the worldbuilding in the story. I liked learning about all the different types of jinx-workers and charm-workers. Some of the powers were really unique and interesting and they added to the culture of Gomorrah. I liked learning about the history of Gomorrah and it’s role with the rest of the world. Things I Didn’t Like The story just never really hooked me, and that was really sad for me. I liked basically everything – it checked all my boxes, but I never got fully invested. Like I said, I really liked all the story elements and how everything came together, but the story never really grabbed me. However, Daughter of the Burning City is definitely worth the read. The characters are well crafted and the relationship are developed. Gomorrah is a vibrant and captivating setting the immediately pulls you in.
ahyperboliclife More than 1 year ago
3.75 Stars “I’ve always preferred change to tradition.” Daughter of the Burning City was such a fantastically dark fantasy filled with interesting characters with questionable motives. We follow Sorina, an illusion-worker who operates the festival’s freak show with her Illusion crafted family. But when some of her illusions are found dead, Sorina teams up with the mysterious Luca to find answers; searching through the underbelly of the festival. Things I Liked The tone and atmosphere of Gomorrah was so perfect. The underhandedness, the thievery, the overall grey and amoral vibes were so perfect, especially as a Halloween read. I really liked Sorina’s illusions. They were all really interesting characters, and I loved that we got to know them independently, not just extensions of her. I also thought the character profiles for the “freaks” was awesome and I loved seeing them, especially with the morbid note from the killer. I thought how the illusions operated was clever and compelling. I really liked the worldbuilding in the story. I liked learning about all the different types of jinx-workers and charm-workers. Some of the powers were really unique and interesting and they added to the culture of Gomorrah. I liked learning about the history of Gomorrah and it’s role with the rest of the world. Things I Didn’t Like The story just never really hooked me, and that was really sad for me. I liked basically everything – it checked all my boxes, but I never got fully invested. Like I said, I really liked all the story elements and how everything came together, but the story never really grabbed me. However, Daughter of the Burning City is definitely worth the read. The characters are well crafted and the relationship are developed. Gomorrah is a vibrant and captivating setting the immediately pulls you in.
pooled_ink More than 1 year ago
pooled ink Reviews: 3.75 Stars Beware the city that burns with souls, entices the nightmares, and celebrates the strange. Filled with death and deception, become beguiled by horrors, softened by sorrow, and yearning for fun as you read the tale, DAUGHTER OF THE BURNING CITY. (Read my FULL review on my Wordpress site: Pooled Ink) Positives! -Standalone novel -Happy ending -a really original murder mystery in a magical wandering carnival/city! Negatives. -Dragged occassionally & I got impatient halfway through -Felt unfocused with plot lines that were supposed to be clever but felt unnecessary & distracting -MC was fickle and impulsive
FayTannerr More than 1 year ago
Daughter of the Burning City was an enticing, mysterious and compelling novel. It tells the story of Sorina, an illusion-worker working in the Festival of Gomorrah. Sorina has created illusions that others can see, feel and touch, with personalities of their own. Her creations are her family, and together they make up the cast of the Festival’s Freak Show. Her illusions are still just that—illusions, and not truly real. Or so she always believed…until one of them is murdered. Sorina must try to find out who the killer is with the help of Luca, a self proclaimed gossip-worker and how to get justice for her family. Debut author Amanda Foody did an excellent job with an intricately written plot filled with murder, mystery and excitement. I loved all the details that were described in a mesmerizing way from the smell of licorice cherries to the smell of the smoke that is continuously in Gommorrah's air. I also enjoyed the details that went into describing the Freak Show and all of Gomorrah including Up-Hill, Down-Hill and Skull Gate. I found the characters to be unique and interesting. I really Liked Sorina's character and her unique abilities as well as all her family's abilities. I also liked Luca and his snark. He was a mystery and I think just great! Verena, Du, Unu, Tree, Gill, Crown, Nicoleta, Blister, Hawk and Kahina were really interesting characters too and made the story work! The illustrations in the book were also a really nice touch! I truly enjoyed Daughter of the Burning city and would recommend fans of fantasy and mystery to give Daughter of the Burning City a try!
taramichelle More than 1 year ago
When I first heard about this book, I was slightly hesitant. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to read another circus-themed book this year. Then I read the summary and saw that the main character was a blind illusion worker and that there was a murder mystery. Since I’m a huge fan of anything that combines fantasy and mystery, I was sold. Daughter of the Burning City ended up being a wonderfully imaginative and innovative debut full of magic, mystery, and murder. From page one, the festival that never stops burning came alive for me. It was beautifully created and felt almost like another character in the book. Gomorrah also has its own history and mythology, which I found fascinating and would probably read an entire separate book about. As Sorina and Luca’s investigation progressed, I loved meeting the festival’s inhabitants and seeing how the festival functioned. The political aspect and the jynx-work explanation could have been developed a bit more but was overall easily understandable and interesting. Also, I really want to try some licorice cherries right now, they sound fantastic. Sorina was an interesting narrator. She was a very flawed character but her fierce determination to keep her family safe made me love her. At times she did act rather juvenile and immature but I liked that she wasn’t perfect and that she made mistakes. She had her own insecurities and fears that affected how she acted and how she viewed the world. I also loved how she matured and grew up as the novel developed. It was honestly quite refreshing to have a narrator who wasn’t perfect and didn’t have all the answers. She was one of the most realistic characters I’ve read in a while. Luca was such an entertaining love interest. I liked that it wasn’t insta-love between them, that the attraction developed over time. He was an excellent blend of forbidden love interest, Sherlock Holmes, and snark. He and Sorina balanced each other out well, their relationship felt equal and realistic to me. Plus I absolutely loved that they both knew the other’s flaws and loved them more because of them (I could’t help but laugh with every headless comment Sorina made). Luca wasn’t my favorite at first but he wormed his way into my heart over the course of the novel. I will admit that it was hard to keep her family members straight in my head for the first half of the book. Additionally, there were some things mentioned later on in the book, such as Blister’s age or Crown’s nail skin, that I hadn’t remembered reading in the beginning (this could be entirely due to my own faulty memory though). I loved how varied and diverse the secondary characters were in every aspect, including sexuality. We didn’t get to know all of them very well but they each had their own personality traits and quirks. What I loved most was that I never got the sense that the author was adding characters solely solely for diversity. Instead, I got the feeling that this was simply the way Gomorrah was in her mind, a diverse smorgasbord of people who came together because the festival was the one place where they were free to be themselves. Daughter of the Burning City was an entrancing and unique debut that flawlessly combined fantasy, family, and riddles. I don’t know if there is a sequel in the works but I’m crossing my fingers that there will be! *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
TheLiteraryPhoenix More than 1 year ago
I finished this book last night and I am still not done with it. Bear with me, because there is SO MUCH GOING ON (in a good way) and there are LOADS of little things I want to talk about. Sorina is an immediately likable character. She is talented, kind, loving, a little funny, and innocent but not stupid. Even when she is grieving, she is confused but never completely lost. She never claims to be a heroine, AND she never says she is not. She is, simply, Sorina. I love her. I love her awkwardness and jeweled masks (this is SCREAMING bookish Halloween costume, guys) and her great big heart. I WAS ROOTING FOR HER. I never like the protagonist, but I liked Sorina. As for the surrounding characters, they are all wonderful. Foody includes illustrations of Sorina's family members, and they are PERFECT. Nicoleta was my personal favorite. They also serve to MESS WITH THE READER'S MIND by inferring patterns and misleading you. Sorina is NOT an unreliable narrator, not on purpose, but her entire world will mess with you. The misdirection was fabulous, the ideas original... I just... I loved it from cover to cover. THINGS WHICH WERE WONDERFUL: - Sorina's family. They are sweet and perfect. - Luca. I should've called the thing with him, and I didn't, and I am ashamed, but I LOVED IT. - The villains. I wanted SO BAD for a certain character to be the villain and was frustrated when it appeared to be someone else THEN... BOOM! ZAP! POW! It was that character and it was aweeeesome. - The world ITSELF was great. It reminded me of something foreign and exotic, but brimming with character and untapped beauty. - The homage to the story of Sodom & Gomorrah with the salt tower was fab. THINGS WHICH I DID NOT ENJOY: - It started REALLY quickly and I had to reread a smidge and get my bearings. - It ended REALLY quickly and I want more. All in all, I read Daughter of the Burning City as a slice of life, not a full story in that there were more adventures before and more to come. Things do not necessarily get wrapped nicely in a bow and there's definitely a LOT of room here to wonder what comes next, and what is missing. BUT. I don't mind that. I do wonder though.... 1. What happens to Kahina? 2. Is there war? 3. Does Sorina continue creating family members? All in all, I give Daughter of the Burning City ALL THE STARS and would like to beseech Amanda Foody to consider writing another story within this world, because I would like to give her more money. THANKS.
Bayy2455 More than 1 year ago
Originally posted on bayyinwonderland.wordpress.com 3.5 Stars I wanted to love this one, I really did. An ace character in a fantasy book? Sign me up. But unfortunately it just fell flat to me. I’m not sure why, either. I just didn’t connect as strongly as I thought I would. Halfway through, I found myself wanting to skip to the end to just see who the killer was and get it over with. I loved the unique setting. The band of characters were absolutely unique and I’d never read anything like them. The circus brought an interesting element to it. However, the beginning of the novel had me completely overwhelmed. I had to keep flipping back to the passage to see who was who again. Hawk was obvious, the bird lady, but the rest took about 1/3 of the novel to really know who was who. It’s the reason it took me so long to finish this one. I picked it up a few weeks ago and immediately decided I didn’t have enough brain power right now to sort through the characters. I never saw the twist coming and it did feel like a satisfactory ending. I don’t know what my problem with this book was, I just didn’t love it.
TheThoughtSpot More than 1 year ago
I received a paperback copy of Daughter of the Burning City by Amanda Foody through a Goodreads giveaway and I also received an ARC from Harlequin Teen and NetGalley. Everything is a bit confusing with the descriptions of the illusions as the story begins. Sorina creates illusions, she's the daughter of a freakshow master and she has no eyes. Her family members are actually all illusions created by Sorina. The illusions act as real people do and they are leading their own lives. Someone starts killing the illusions and investigations begin. People are accused and finally the killer is found. The writing conventions are done well, but I just had a difficult time with and understanding the concept and world building of the story. 3 stars.
Taylor_FrayedBooks More than 1 year ago
This book was such a dark, magical tale. The entire time, I really felt like I was at the Gomorrah Festival and Foody does an amazing job of painting a picture for a setting. I love to be transported to a spot while I read and this book 100% did that for me. SORINA IS SUCH A GREAT CHARACTER and her jynx is so unique: she is able to make people she imagines come to life. These people are her family and her care/concern for them is so heartwarming. BUT I have to say that the plot line contains so much more darkness and mystery which keeps you on the edge of your seat until the final page!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So weird and creepy and fun!
AsDreamsAreMade More than 1 year ago
Sigh. I just…sigh. Sorina was brought up in the colorful, dark and exotic atmosphere of the Gommorah festival. Despite not having any physical eyes, she’s able to see everything and is an illusionist.  One who created her own version of a family with her illusions. However, when somebody starts murdering them–something that shouldn’t be possible–she must solve the mystery before any more of her family members are killed.  The deeper she delves though, secrets and a sinister plot are revealed that go much deeper than she ever imagined. Lately, I feel like I’ve been striking out in the book department. So far, anything I’ve read has been less than stellar. This just follows in those footsteps. I had such high hopes for this book. I really did. It seemed original and exotic and mysterious and just plain interesting, but once again, I was left disappointed. What was so horrible you ask? Well there were a few issues I had with this book. The main one being the pacing. It was all over the place. There were action sequences and dramatic sequences that popped out of nowhere and weren’t really justified. It just seemed like there was no groove in the storytelling and was it very disjointed. Because of that, the twists were a bit predictable and lacking urgency. This was further hindered by some of the character development. Sorina and the other characters were simply lackluster for me. They were rather two-dimensional and I just couldn’t get invested in them. The most interesting of them was Luca. He was the bright spot in a somewhat dreary saga. I know I haven’t been the only one feeling this way, but still. I was expecting a lot more and was just not given it. It was an original concept with some colorful ideas but unfortunately, it wasn’t executed well enough for me.
Seoling More than 1 year ago
I had the great opportunity to snag a copy of DAUGHTER OF THE BURNING CITY from Harlequin during Book Expo and let me tell you – I was seriously excited about this debut from Amanda Foody. I was disappointed that there was not more buzz around it, but judging by the enormous line at the Harlequin booth the morning of the signing, it definitely got the word out about this story. First thing’s first – I love the cover. I wasn’t sure how I felt about the typography of the title, but it seriously grew on me and became such a good design aesthetic for the whole plot itself. And have you seen the UK version of DOTBC? It’s just as pretty and is going to force me to buy that version too. The story follows young Sorina, a jynx-worker with the ability to create illusions that fill Gomorrah’s Festival and entertain the audiences of the Up-Mountainers who look down upon Sorina and the other Down-Mountainers. It isn’t until one of her illusions is murdered that she realizes that her imaginary family is far from imaginary and she begins her own investigation into who is responsible. And throughout her journey, she discovers more about her past, present, and future that define her for more than her rare ability to create illusions to awe and amaze. I felt like the story started out slow, but really picked up the pace as the plot unraveled and I got into the thick of the actual book. For a debut, Foody demonstrates the craft of a seasoned writer. The world she creates is dark and complex, well-thought out and makes me want to come to the Gomorrah Festival. The characters (though at times I forgot who was who) were engaging and developed, particularly Sorina and Luca. I felt absolutely swept away by the griping mystery surrounding the murderer of Gomorrah. By the time I was nearing the end, I just couldn’t stop thinking about reading more. I think it’s so original of Foody to create these characters that are so reminiscent of those old Vaudeville-esque entertainers that were popularized in the early part of the 20th century. But the idea of tying in these odd and attention-grabbing “circus freaks” really rounds out Gomorrah. I absolutely loved knowing more about each of Sorina’s family members and how they seemed to just stick together through the thick of these events plaguing them all. And yet, despite being so close and devoted to her family, it becomes more paralyzing for Sorina to realize that it may be one of her own performing the murders. Sorina is a fantastic MC and even a better heroine in DOTBC. From her unique appearance to her dedication to her one and only family, she really shines in a way that I hope Foody was not expected. And when I say this, I feel like authors never realize the impact that their characters can have on readers, especially strong and commanding young women like Sorina. Yet, despite her strength in convictions, she still possesses the insecurities that any woman would have and that any reader can understand – with appearances, finding someone to love her, and other issues that stay relevant despite this overarching plot concerning Gomorrah and the impending veil of danger. I loved this about Sorina so much. Every now and again, I got to see how she was insecure about her lack of eyes and the many masks that she wore to cover up that ‘deformity’ of hers and how that impacted her relationship with Luca in particularly.