The Day of Atonement

The Day of Atonement

by David Liss

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Overview

The Day of Atonement by David Liss

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY LIBRARY JOURNALLook for special features inside. Join the Random House Reader’s Circle for author chats and more.

The bestselling author of such novels as A Conspiracy of Paper and The Whiskey Rebels continues his masterly run of “atmospheric” (The Washington Post), “page-turning” (The Baltimore Sun), “tremendously smart” (Newsweek) historical thrillers. In The Day of Atonement, David Liss blends meticulous period detail with crackling adventure in the tale of one man’s quest for justice—and retribution.
 
Sebastião Raposa is only thirteen when his parents are unjustly imprisoned, never to be seen again, and he is forced to flee Portugal lest he too fall victim to the Inquisition. But ten years in exile only serve to whet his appetite for vengeance. Returning at last to Lisbon, in the guise of English businessman Sebastian Foxx, he is no longer a frightened boy but a dangerous man tormented by violent impulses. Haunted by the specter of all he has lost—including his exquisite first love—Foxx is determined to right old wrongs by punishing an unforgivable enemy with unrelenting fury.
 
Well schooled by his benefactor, the notorious bounty hunter Benjamin Weaver, in the use of wits, fists, and a variety of weapons, Foxx stalks the ruthless Inquisitor priest Pedro Azinheiro. But in a city ruled by terror and treachery, where money and information can buy power and trump any law, no enemy should be underestimated and no ally can be trusted. Having risked everything, and once again under the watchful eye of the Inquisition, Foxx finds his plans unraveling as he becomes drawn into the struggles of old friends—and new enemies—none of whom, like Lisbon itself, are what they seem.
 
Compelled to play a game of deception and greed, Sebastian Foxx will find himself befriended, betrayed, tempted by desire, and tormented by personal turmoil. And when a twist of fate turns his carefully laid plans to chaos, he will be forced to choose between surrendering to bloodlust or serving the cause of mercy.

Praise for The Day of Atonement
 
“Enthralling . . . [a] sly, rich and swift novel of vengeance and rough justice.”The Seattle Times
 
“One of the masters of the historical thriller, Liss is back with yet another highly entertaining novel. . . . [The Day of Atonement] paints a vivid picture of the waning days of the Inquisition, and of the truly evil religious leaders who led it. One of Liss’s best books.”—Minneapolis Star Tribune

“Foxx is reminiscent of Lee Child’s Jack Reacher: a man with his own moral code who takes on multiple adversaries simultaneously. . . . Liss has the start of another solidly researched, action-packed historical series here.”Booklist (starred review)
 
“[An] action-packed novel.”The Wall Street Journal
 
“Snappy dialogue and convincing atmosphere . . . The plot moves swiftly to a shattering climax.”The Washington Post

“Another intriguing thriller set against historical events for Liss, who has a knack for period detail, breakneck plots and characters we want to root for.”San Antonio Express-News
 
“Fans of Liss know well his mix of dark arts and historical detail.”—New York Daily News

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780345520197
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/22/2015
Series: Benjamin Weaver Series , #4
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 379,060
Product dimensions: 7.90(w) x 5.10(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author

David Liss is the author of The Day of Atonement, The Twelfth Enchantment, The Devil’s Company, The Whiskey Rebels, The Ethical Assassin, A Spectacle of Corruption, The Coffee Trader, and A Conspiracy of Paper, winner of the Edgar Award for Best First Novel. He lives in San Antonio with his wife and children.


Hometown:

San Antonio, Texas

Date of Birth:

March 16, 1966

Place of Birth:

Englewood, New Jersey

Education:

B.S., M.A., M.Phil.

Read an Excerpt

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Excerpted from "The Day of Atonement"
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Copyright © 2015 David Liss.
Excerpted by permission of Random House Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Reading Group Guide

A Conversation with David Liss

Random House Reader’s Circle: What was your inspiration for the novel?

David Liss: I first learned about the Lisbon earthquake of 1755 when I took my first eighteenth—century literature class in grad school, and it’s one of those things that always stuck in my imagination. Though it’s not well known by Americans today, it was a consciousness—changing event for eighteenth—century European intellectuals, who couldn’t quite comprehend how one of the world’s great cities could simply cease to exist. Usually when I’m finishing a book, I know exactly what I want to work on next. But after The Twelfth Enchantment, I didn’t have a clear idea, so I decided that maybe it was time to finally look into the earthquake. I began doing a little bit of light research on eighteenth—century Portugal in general to see if there was a story that would draw me in, and I became instantly fascinated with the political corruption, religious injustice, and economic ineptitude of the period. From there, I simply kept doing research until the story began to take shape. Originally I planned to write a sort of post—disaster novel in which I set up events for the earthquake fairly quickly, and then explored the aftermath in the bulk of the book. As I began writing the book, however, it became clear to me that it was Lisbon before the earthquake, not after, that really fascinated me.

RHRC: Sebastiao is an exceptional character in terms of skill, determination, and focus. What made you want to tell his story?

DL: Once I was fairly well steeped in the research for this book, I knew I wanted to write a revenge story, which seemed like a natural narrative for such an unjust society. Sebastiao took shape as I tried to figure out what sort of character would work best for this world. I liked the idea of someone who had been utterly broken by the injustice he’d suffered, so I began working from there. Revenge is always a losing proposition, of course, since it invariably leaves the seeker feeling empty afterward, so I wanted to write about someone who was looking for something more than justice. Sebastiao, troubled as he is, understands that vengeance is a process for him, not necessarily justice against those who have done wrong.

RHRC: The Day of Atonement is a return to historical fiction, after The Twelfth Enchantment, a novel with magical and supernatural elements. Do you find there are major differences between writing historical fiction and writing fantasy? Which do you prefer?

DL: When I write fantasy, it tends to be of the historical variety, which is usually very research—heavy, so there’s really not that much difference. I’m still working within certain limitations of history and culture—-as opposed to the sort of fantasy that takes place in a totally imagined world. I’m not sure if I prefer writing either one. Each has its own pleasures for me. That said, the two genres, in my view, are closely related. When you write about
periods of time before film or photography or sound recording, you have to make a lot of guesses about what life was like for your characters. They are often educated guesses, but you are still engaging in world—building and constructing an imaginative world for your reader to inhabit. If the physics and biology of that world are the same as ours, it’s historical fiction; if not, it’s fantasy.

RHRC: What were some of the specific challenges you faced in writing or researching this novel?

DL: The Day of Atonement presented some very specific challenges because Lisbon, as it existed before the earthquake, is almost entirely gone. A great deal of the work I did for this book involved trying to understand what life was like in destroyed Lisbon for people from all the various social strata. The English of this period were highly literate (by contemporary standards) and fascinated with themselves, so eighteenth—century London is extremely easy to research. Lisbon, by contrast, is less well recorded, so there was a lot of archival and detective work involved.

RHRC: What was your research process like?

DL: I tend to work from the broad to the particular. When I’m researching a culture I know almost nothing about, as I did with this book, I first look for the very general surveys of the material—-popular histories, or even books for younger readers. I want to understand the basics before I get into specifics, because otherwise I don’t really know what I’m looking at. Once I begin to have a sense of what interests me, I’ll read more scholarly works, and studies of specific people or events, or of cultural movements. From there I go to primary sources: letters, diaries, contemporary travel guides, and whatever else is available. Finally, when I have a near—final version of the book, I visit the place I’m writing about. I find if I go too early in the process, I’m not sufficiently focused; if I go later, I know exactly what I need to look for or at.

RHRC: Benjamin Weaver, the protagonist of several of your other novels, makes an appearance. What made you decide to bring him back? Did it feel strange to be writing about him from a different character’s perspective?

DL: There were certain similarities in the skill sets of the two characters, even though their personalities are very different, so I began to think it might be fun to have Weaver as a minor character in this book. Readers often contact me asking if I plan to write any more novels featuring Benjamin Weaver, and right now I have no intention of doing so, but it was interesting to think about him as an older, more settled figure. I’ve never had any interest in writing an entire novel about an older version of the character, so having him appear as a minor character here allowed me to imagine his life progressing without having to work a full narrative around it.

RHRC: The novel is set during a particularly tumultuous time in politics and religion. Do you see any lessons for the modern world in the realities of that setting?

DL: I tend to believe that every time is a tumultuous time for politics and religion—-which often serve, in my view, as an excuse for, rather than a cause of, aggression and animosity. I’m not sure there is any particularly insightful lesson to take away. There are always going to be those who will misuse and abuse power if given the chance. There are pretty universal occurrences, but I do find it interesting to see how they manifested in the past. Looking at these events through the lens of history can help to defamiliarize, and therefore shed light on, events in our own time.

1. Two big themes of the novel are vengeance and mercy. Do you think the two are mutually exclusive? Can you be both vengeful and merciful at the same time?

2. Discuss the meaning of the title The Day of Atonement.

3. The novel ends before we know how Roberta responds to Sebastiao. What do you imagine she says to him? What would you say to him in her place?

4. Do you see Sebastiao’s concept of justice evolve at all throughout the novel? If so, how, and what do you think prompts the change?

5. Comparing his own deception to Roberta Carver’s, Sebastiao thinks, “The Carvers’ crime against Settewell had been unforgiveable. It was not a slightly unscrupulous take on usual trade—-it was theft, pure and simple. What I intended was, of course, much the same, but my scheme had the virtue of being retaliatory” (page 209). Do you agree with the idea that his actions are somehow more justifiable because they were preceded first by another crime? Is revenge ever justifiable?

6. Which of the characters in this novel do you most identify with, and why?

7. At the start of Chapter 1, Sebastiao declares, “I am not a kind person. . . . If I am a monster, however, I am monster made, not born” (page 19). What does this opening suggest about the nature of goodness and evil? After reading the novel, do you agree or disagree with his declaration?

8. Compare and contrast Roberta and Gabriela. What do you think the two women represent to Sebastiao, and how do you see that change over the course of the novel?

9.  At the end of his final confrontation with Azinheiro, Sebastiao is faced with a very important choice. Were you surprised by the choice he made? In his shoes, do you think you would have made the same one?

10. How do you think your opinion of the characters might change if this were a book of nonfiction, and not a novel?

Customer Reviews

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Day of Atonement: A Novel 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Vengeance and power and conflicts deeply embroiled here, why? Historical period so detailed. Judaism to the Christian faith, because of the inquisition they were persecuted. I was not disappointed at all because the protagonist entertain me with his anger, hell bent on getting revenge. Very interesting read that kept me reading further along with much eagerness and fervor . The author's writing style is reflected here, very influential. Good job! I won this book on Goodreads First Read Giveaway. Thank you, Darlene Cruz
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm a big David Liss fan, and loved the first 2/3rds of this book. But things began to disappoint as Sebastion Foxx turned into Superman. I accept that he will win every fight he is in, but killing 6 armed solders guarding Azinheiro was a little too much for me to handle. But beyond the SuperHero aspect, another excellent story.
WriteReason More than 1 year ago
A fast paced historical novel set in 1700's Portugal.  Vengeance against the Portuguese Inquisition, and those responsible for the fate of his family are the reasons for the star character, Sebastion Foxx, return to Lisbon.  Mr. Liss paints a clear picture of the time period, in the streets of this city, and the characters he develops for this period.  The pace is quick, the action is steady, and the story moves forward.  I enjoyed reading another book by Mr. Liss, but unlike The Twelfth Enchantment, and the Whiskey Rebels, it just did not pull me into it.  Something was amiss.  Don't get me wrong, it is a good story, but the pace may be too fast, and pushed too quickly.  Everything Mr. Foxx did was too perfect, he almost could do no wrong.  Sometimes a bit contrived.  I still  enjoyed the tale, and recomend it for a good read, but clearly, I do not feel this is Mr. Liss best.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
THIS BOOK WAS SO GOOD, it literally made me cry. It describes things in so much detail that it's like I'm actually there. It's so good that I wish there was a sequel. That book that you wish it never ended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Full of history and intigue!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
All his books are excellent.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've enjoyed reading all of his work and this one does not disappoint. I look forward to the next one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wayne0 More than 1 year ago
One of Liss's best offerings.  It is mature and complex. The narrative drives forward.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Another great one from Mr. Liss!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Another excellent book by David Liss !