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A Day with Wilbur Robinson
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A Day with Wilbur Robinson

4.6 3
by William Joyce
 

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While spending the day in the Robinson household, Wilbur’s best friend Lewis helps search for Grandfather Robinson’s missing false teeth in this classic picture book from William Joyce that inspired the Disney animated sci-fi comedy, Meet the Robinsons!

No need to knock, just step right in. You’re just in time to two-step with Grandfather

Overview

While spending the day in the Robinson household, Wilbur’s best friend Lewis helps search for Grandfather Robinson’s missing false teeth in this classic picture book from William Joyce that inspired the Disney animated sci-fi comedy, Meet the Robinsons!

No need to knock, just step right in. You’re just in time to two-step with Grandfather Robinson and his dancing frog band. Cousin Laszlo is demonstrating his new antigravity device. And Uncle Art’s flying saucer is parked out back. It seems like all the Robinson relatives are here, so be prepared. And keep your head down…Uncle Gaston is testing out the family cannon. Oh, and watch where you sit, Grandpa’s lost his teeth again. Welcome to the Robinson’s.

Editorial Reviews

Washington Post
... this may be the best picture book of the year ...
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Dinosaur Bob fans should rejoice: in his latest work, Joyce pulls out all the stops and introduces the weirdest family since his Lazardo clan. A young narrator, going to see his best friend Wilbur, remarks, ``His house is the greatest place to visit.'' Readers soon see why. Wilbur's large household includes an aunt whose train set is life-sized, an uncle who shares his ``deep thoughts'' (``Mississippi spelled with o 's . . . would be Mossossoppo !'') and a grandfather who trains a dancing frog band. There's not much in the way of formal plot here--save a slight mystery involving Grandfather's missing false teeth--but Joyce's wonderfully strange paintings abound with hilarious, surprising details and leave the impression that a lot has happened. A visit to the Robinsons' is a bit overwhelming (as the narrator says, ``I was kind of sad to leave, but I was ready to go home for a while''), but it's a trip children will want to make again and again. Ages 4-8. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Jan Lieberman
Who stole Grandfather's teeth? Was it Uncle Gaston, the cannon sitter, Carl, the family's robot, Uncle Judlow wearing his brain augmentor, or Cousin Laslo with his anti-gravity device? Spend A Day with Wilber Robinson and his weird, non-conformist family to find out where Grandfather's teeth can be. Author/illustrator William Joyce claims this is a thickly disguised account of his own childhood. 1993 (orig.
Children's Literature - Melissa J. Rickey
Come meet William Robin's retro, zany, and futuristic family. Grandfather's false teeth are missing, and so is grandfather. A homesick uncle arrives from his distant planet. The time machine is stuck in the Mesozoic period, and dinosaurs are swimming in the pool. And this is just the beginning of the day. The unnamed narrator, a good friend of William Robinson's, recounts the events of his visit and overnight stay at the Robinson family home. The two boys, on a search for Grandfather's teeth, meet up with aunts, uncles, parents, siblings, artifacts, antigravity devices, train sets, and creatures that loom large and dark in the otherwise realistic/retro and vibrant illustrations. After dinner, family and friends gather to listen to Mrs. Robinson read. A surprising encounter with a frog leads to our narrator's discovery of Grandfather's teeth, a cause for celebration and a spontaneous pillow fight. Eventually all retire: "...we floated across the lawn and into a tree with the help of Cousin Laszlo's antigravity device.... Wilbur and I stayed up late into the night while Uncle Art told stories about his adventures in outer space, as the frogs played softly on their violins." The next morning, William Robinson apologizes to his friend for "such a dull day." But for his friend, a return to some semblance of normalcy is in order, along with the anticipation of future visits.
School Library Journal
The Robinson's house is not like anyone else's because Wilbur's family is not like any other. The slim plot that involves Wilbur and his visiting friend looking for Grandfather's lost false teeth is just a device to introduce the wonderfully weird family members. Most of the jokes are only in the pictures, while the restrained, slightly tongue-in-cheek text provides a satisfying contrast. The text states that Aunt Billie is playing with her train set, Cousin Pete is walking the cats, and Uncle Art has just arrived from abroad, but the trains are shown as full sized, the cats are tigers, and Uncle Art is stepping out of a flying saucer. The illustrative style is reminiscent in both color and form of 1940s advertising art. Many details such as hairstyles, clothing, and even a robot seem influenced by that period. In keeping with the advertising look, the layout is open and spacious. Although the figures often appear frozen in a pose, even when gesticulating, and the two boys are mainly passive observers except in a close-up of a wild pillow fight, the imaginative details and the changing perspectives keep the pictures interesting. Children may not realize that the dancing frogs are watching Fred Astaire movies or that sister has a model of the Empire State building for a headdress--these jokes are for adults--but they will enjoy the imaginative play and delight in filling in the text. --Karen James, Louisville Free Public Library, KY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781481489515
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
04/25/2017
Series:
World of William Joyce Series
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
520,545
Product dimensions:
10.10(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

William Joyce does a lot of stuff but children’s books are his true bailiwick (The Numberlys, Rolie Polie Olie, Dinosaur Bob, George Shrinks, and the #1 New York Times bestselling The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore, which is also his Academy Award–winning short film, to name a few). He lives in Shreveport, Louisiana. Talk to William Joyce and look at upcoming work at @HeyBillJoyce on Twitter and Instagram.

William Joyce does a lot of stuff but children’s books are his true bailiwick (The Numberlys, Rolie Polie Olie, Dinosaur Bob, George Shrinks, and the #1 New York Times bestselling The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore, which is also his Academy Award–winning short film, to name a few). He lives in Shreveport, Louisiana. Talk to William Joyce and look at upcoming work at @HeyBillJoyce on Twitter and Instagram.

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Day with Wilbur Robinson 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book changed my life. Winnie the Pooh was great, Where the Wild Things Are, a monument. This book should win the first Nobel Prize for the happiest thing that has ever been in print. It is like a Fred Astaire movie. It is like Philadelphia Story. It's like The Great Gatsby. It is like King Kong all in 40 delirious pages.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago