Days of Infamy (Pacific War Series #1)

Days of Infamy (Pacific War Series #1)

by Harry Turtledove
3.8 21

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reprint)

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Overview

Days of Infamy (Pacific War Series #1) by Harry Turtledove

On December 7, 1941, the Japanese launched an attack against United States naval forces stationed in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. But what if the Japanese followed up their air assault with an invasion and occupation of Hawaii? With American military forces subjugated and civilians living in fear of their conquerors, there is no one to stop the Japanese from using the islands' resources to launch an offensive against America's western coast.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451460561
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 11/28/2005
Series: Pacific War Series , #1
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 528
Product dimensions: 4.48(w) x 6.82(h) x 1.45(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Harry Turtledove—the New York Times bestselling author of numerous alternate history novels, including The Guns of the South, How Few Remain, and the Worldwar quartet—has a Ph.D. in Byzantine history. Nominated numerous times for the Nebula Award, he has won the Hugo, Sidewise, and John Esthen Cook Awards. He lives with his wife and children in California.

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4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
KeikoHP More than 1 year ago
This is an extremely dramatic, highly interesting book. As a wife and mother of Japanese citizens, I particularly enjoyed it. Its only flaw is that a lot of the characters are not especially sympathetic. (To me, the Japanese ones tended to be more likeable than the Americans!) But to see American history turned on its head is thought-provoking.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been a fan of Harry Turtledove's writings for 5 years, and while 'Days on Infamy' was engrossing and with fascinating characters, as is true of all his other titles, this one leaves much to be desired. As a couple of other reviewers have already pointed, you don't find out what happens to 90% of the characters. br P The unwrapped loose ends wouldn't be so bad if it were evident that Turtledove intended this to be the first installment in a series (a la 'The Great War' and 'Settling Accounts' trilogies) but the author gives no such indication rather, this appears to be a stand-alone novel with no plans for a sequel. br P There is also one scene in partucular that struck me, as an active-duty military officer AND a military history buff to boot, as being non-sensical: the scene in which Japanese Army Corporal Shimuzu, taking his troops for a night out on the town, requires his men to salute NCOs and not just commissioned officers. I know of NO military, past or present, that requires enlisted men to salute NCOs (excpet during certain ceremonious occasions such as guardmount/open ranks inspections). Yes, the Imperial Japanese Army was very disciplinarian and elitist, but I seriously doubt that they'd flout long-standing S.O.P. military tradition, customs, and courtesies in that manner! br P That said, the battle scenes are thrilling, and the characters, Japanese and American alike, grab your attention. As someone who has several second and third-generation Japanese-American friends, I can feel for characters like Kenzo 'Ken' Takahashi who are struggling to gain acceptance as real Americans, while I'm disgusted with the cavalier and dictator-coddling attitude of Ken's father Jiro, who's been reaping the benefits and freedoms of living in America for so long yet is completely ingrateful for said freedoms to the point that he openly kisses up to the Imperial Japanese occupiers. br P The ending is disturbing to say the least and makes you really stop and think, 'What if?' And as an American whose father served in the USMC in WWII and whose mother endured Tojo's brutal occupation of the Philippines from 1941-45, it makes me thank God that much more that things did NOT really turn out as envisioned in Turtledove's novel, and thank God that Tojo's evil, despotic regime was ultimately defeated.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the first and last Turtledove novel that I purchased. While I find the concept of alternative history interesting, it is nevertheless still a 'story.' The author takes an inordinate amount of time setting up the central cast of characters, to the point that you literally develop a vested interest in their plot lines, only to be left at the end of the book not knowing what happens to 90% of them. The concept, of an actual Japanese landing force in the Hawaiian islands is intriguing, as that is what the U.S. was truly concerned about after the real attack in 1941. Buying and reading this book left me with the same feeling that I would have if I just had a restaurant waiter come back and tell me my credit card was over the limit: I would be confused and embarassed about the whole situation.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found this book annoying on several levels. The Japanese, having manufactured troops, shipping, and oil out of thin air, descend on Hawaii and defeat 300 land- and ship-based US aircraft with barely a scratch to one of their carriers. They then are allowed six months to consolidate their conquest without a ripost from the US Fleet. Many US ships are conveniently trapped in Pearl Harbor, while the Japanese sail without an anchorage for months. Much of the book is dedicated to the suffering of POWs, and white and Japanese-american citizens, which rapidly becomes boring. Mr. Turtledove also places events and quotes (like Eisenhower's never-delivered D-Day defeat speech)into this new alternate history without footnotes or attribution. And then the book ends, leaving the reader out his $25 for half a story.
Angela Morgan More than 1 year ago
It made me feel like I was there.
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Jason Cook More than 1 year ago
It left me wanting more. I highly recommend it.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
First I must admit to some surprise at the differing reviews for ¿Days of Infamy¿. I loved it. Yes, it is WW2 but a quite different scenario than his other books in this time. In this book, Japan follows up her attack on the `sleeping giant¿ with an invasion. He looks at a reaction from the shattered U.S forces and a hasty response from the main land later. I found the book to be a ¿page turner¿, i.e. a book that I could not put down. I read it in a week and constantly enjoyed the different viewpoints from Japanese and U.S sailors, army and aviators. As a bonus the civilian population, both Japanese and ¿haoles¿, provided a great contrasting viewpoint. Sam Hendricks, author of ¿Fantasy Football Guidebook: Your Comprehensive Guide to Playing Fantasy Football¿.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am an avid fan of Harry Turtledove, and I especially enjoyed his 'World War' and 'Great War' stories. I was expecting brilliance when I purchased this book. Instead, I found a rather dull and boring story. I suspect that Turtledove began this book with high hopes but quite frankly, didn't know how to end it. Stay away from this one!
J_Clayton More than 1 year ago
This book is an awesome telling of what could of happened in Hawaii had the Japaneses chosen to continue their attack rather than pull back after their devastating assault on US forces stationed there. This book follows the lives of several characters giving you a view of life from all sides of the conflict including civilian, soldier, and prisoner. A must read for anyone interested in World War Two.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love alternative history and I keep hearing that Turtledove is the master of the genere. From what I can see it's nonsense. There was 150 pages of great story in this book. Unfortunately the novel was more than 500 pages long. The entire book does little but set up what must be a three or four book series. There are far too many characters with too many elaborate background stories and the plot grinds to a halt. One of the stories is the riveting tale of a woman growing sweet potatoes! Turtledove is also extremely selective about the 'reality' he brings in. He beats the reader over the head with the superiority of the Zero over the Wildcat [mentioning it more than ten times] but fails to bring in the Allies breaking of the Japanese naval code [JN25] or the Japanese navy's eternal search for the 'ultimate battleship showdown'. Both of these should have come into the story. Still, if Turtledove would stop trying to drag the story out into a cash cow trilogy he might be able to tell a passable story. As it is don't waste your time and money on this mess.