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Dead Wrong
     

Dead Wrong

3.5 2
by Connie Dial
 

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Captain Josie Corsino has selected Kyle Richards, a trusted and talented sergeant, to supervise a burglary task force in Hollywood Division. While working that special detail, Richards is involved in a fatal shooting. He's reluctant to be candid about his relationship with the man he killed and that leads not only to uncovering his mysterious past but exposing Josie's

Overview

Captain Josie Corsino has selected Kyle Richards, a trusted and talented sergeant, to supervise a burglary task force in Hollywood Division. While working that special detail, Richards is involved in a fatal shooting. He's reluctant to be candid about his relationship with the man he killed and that leads not only to uncovering his mysterious past but exposing Josie's division to notoriety and a fiery assault.

As detectives investigate the shooting, Josie's loyalty to her sergeant is second guessed by her bureau chief, civil rights activists, and even a few of her police officers. Was the shooting justified or did Sergeant Richards have another reason for killing the unlikely burglary suspect? Before that question can be answered, there's a brutal murder in Hollywood in which Richards appears to be the most likely suspect. Josie wants to support her supervisor but finds herself questioning his actions and his motives.

Josie joins forces with Detective Red Behan and Lieutenant Marge Bailey to help solve the murder and determine if there is a link between the man Richards shot and the homicide victim. The trail leads from a boxing gym in East LA to LAPD's office of the chief of police and finally back to Hollywood where Josie discovers corrupt cops thriving within her police station.

At home, Josie is becoming impatient and distant with her husband and her son who continue to make demands on her time. She also finds herself drawn to Sergeant Richards, creating even greater domestic turmoil.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In Dial’s workmanlike second mystery featuring LAPD Capt. Josie Corsino (after 2012’s Fallen Angels), Corsino faces a potential powder keg in her department. While checking out a likely false alarm as a member of a burglary task force, Sgt. Kyle Richards, a respected veteran of more than 20 years, shoots dead a suspect who turns out to be Terence “TJ” Dupre, a suspended African-American police officer. Dupre was connected to “slimeball” attorney Maxwell Palmer, who quickly announces plans to sue on Dupre’s behalf. While Det. Abe Romero oversees the investigation into Dupre’s death, Corsino deals with reassigning Richards, placating touchy deputy chief Annie McQueen, and organized protests against the shooting. At home, Corsino contends with a growing gulf between her and husband Jake. A possibly related murder complicates things, and points to corruption in police ranks. Corsino is tough, fair, and aggressive as she maneuvers through personal and professional minefields toward a painful resolution. (May)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781579624873
Publisher:
The Permanent Press
Publication date:
05/31/2013
Pages:
258
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.58(d)

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Dead Wrong 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
SheilaDeeth More than 1 year ago
Captain Josie Corsino, of the LAPD’s Hollywood station, is a pleasingly real, intelligent and flawed protagonist. She’s a great cop but knows she knows she owes her promotion as much to being female as anything else. She’s a good friend, wise to the skills and weaknesses of her crew. She’s a loving mother, balancing a need to boot the son out of the nest with a longing to see him succeed. And she’s a faithful wife, for all that she’s tempted to stray, and feels herself let down by a husband who fails to understand her. Of course, Josie fails to understand him too. And the author's writing stays so firmly in character, the reader just might want to defend the husband while sharing the captain's pain. Communication’s the key, I guess, and one who keeps secrets so successfully at work might indeed find sharing difficult at home. In Dead Wrong, Josie’s best Sergeant, a man she’s seriously drawn to, has been involved in a shooting. Questions arise about secrets he’s keeping too, and Josie struggles with a mix of professional trust and suspicion, even while she balances personal trust and honesty. Police-work and legal details are thoroughly convincing. Characters, with all their failings and quirks, feel ready to step off the page onto the TV screen. Drama blends the low-key everyday with sudden spurts of adrenalin. And the dialog has a convincing authority combined with very human vulnerability. Dead Wrong is dead right in its details and offers a thoroughly enjoyable counter-point to the usual police procedural. Josie drinks but not to excess. She’s hard driven but still keeps her family together. She’s hard done by but stays convincingly in control. And she’s a great protagonist, full of character, dry wit, and stubborn intelligence. Disclosure: I’m writing my honest review of this book, received as a free bound galley from the publisher.
gloriafeit More than 1 year ago
The author’s bona fides are evident from the first page of this, her fourth novel, and the second in the Josie Corsino series: Connie Dial had 27 years of varied experience as a member of the LAPD, including undercover work, narcotics detective, Internal Affairs surveillance officer, watch commander and captain. And her protagonist, Josie Corsino, is an LAPD captain, trying to juggle that demanding job with that of wife and mother, and not always succeeding. After 20 years in the DA’s office, her husband, Jake, had just made partner in his new law firm, and the friction in their marriage is mounting. The tension includes her relationship with her 23-year-old son, still dependent on his parents for support, now involved with a woman Connie’s age. In the opening pages, Kyle Richards, a sergeant Connie had appointed to supervise a burglary task force in Hollywood division, is involved in a fatal shooting. When it is discovered that the dead man was a fellow police officer, after over 20 years on the job, Kyle is faced with a hearing and a possible suspension until it can be proven that it was a justified shooting. Added to the fact that the dead cop was a black man, and Richards white, the political implications make every aspect of the investigation more difficult. With the help of her best friend, vice lieutenant Marge Bailey, and Detective “Red” Behan, Connie goes out on a limb to prove his innocence in the matter. Things only get more complex when another killing occurs, and Connie believes the two events are connected. The novel elucidates the theme that “perception most of the time was more important than truth in the world of policing. A good reputation was difficult to tarnish; a bad reputation whether it was deserved or not was indelible.” This was a well-plotted tale. I have to admit feeling that the writing could have been more polished, but the novel held my interest throughout, and I will look forward to reading the next chapter in Josie Corsino’s life.