The Deadly Brotherhood: The American Combat Soldier in World War II

The Deadly Brotherhood: The American Combat Soldier in World War II

by John McManus
2.2 5

NOOK Book(eBook)

$8.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Overview

The Deadly Brotherhood: The American Combat Soldier in World War II by John McManus

In his book Men Against Fire, [historian S. L. A.] Marshall asserted that only 15 to 25 percent of American soldiers ever fired their weapons in combat in World War II. . . .
Shooting at the enemy made a man part of the “team,” or “brotherhood.” There were, of course, many times when soldiers did not want to shoot, such
as at night when they did not want to give away a position or on reconnaissance patrols. But, in the main, no combat soldier in his right mind would have deliberately sought to go through the entire ear without ever firing his weapon, because he would have been excluded from the brotherhood but also because it would have been detrimental to his own survival. One of [rifle company commander Harold] Leinbaugh’s NCOs summed it up best when discussing Marshall: “Did the SOB think we
clubbed the Germans to death?”


From the Paperback edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780307414953
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 12/18/2007
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 416
Sales rank: 297,424
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

John C. McManus formerly was assistant director of the University of Tennessee’s Center for the Study of War and Society. He now lives in St. Louis where he teaches history at a local college.


From the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Deadly Brotherhood: The American Combat Soldier in World War II 2.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thought the book was well written. The use of survivors quotes confirms the authors views.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago