Dear American Airlines

Dear American Airlines

by Jonathan Miles
3.6 19

Audiobook(CD - Unabridged, 5 CDs, 6 hrs. 15 min.)

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Overview

Dear American Airlines by Jonathan Miles



Bennie Ford, a fifty-three-year-old failed poet turned translator, is traveling to his estranged daughter’s wedding when his flight is canceled. Stuck with thousands of fuming passengers in the purgatory of O’Hare International Airport, he watches the clock tick and realizes that he will miss the ceremony. Frustrated, irate, and helpless, Bennie does the only thing he can: he starts to write a letter. But what begins as a hilariously excoriating demand for a refund soon becomes a lament for a life gone awry, for years misspent, talent wasted, and happiness lost. Bennie’s writing is infused with a sense of remorse for the actions of a lifetime—and made all the more urgent by the fading hope that if he can just make it to the wedding, he might have a chance to do something right.

A margarita blend of outrage, humor, vulnerability, intelligence, and regret, Dear American Airlines gives new meaning to the term "airport novel" and announces the emergence of a major new talent in American fiction.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781433214745
Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.
Publication date: 06/05/2008
Edition description: Unabridged, 5 CDs, 6 hrs. 15 min.
Pages: 5
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 5.80(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

JONATHAN MILES's first novel, Dear American Airlines, was named a New York Times Notable Book and a Best Book of the Year by the Los Angeles Times and the Wall Street Journal. A former columnist for the New York Times, he serves as a contributing editor to magazines as diverse as Field & Stream and Details, and writes regularly for the New York Times Book Review and The Literary Review (UK). A former longtime resident of Oxford, Mississippi, he currently lives with his family in rural New Jersey.

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Dear American Airlines 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this. It speaks for the humans lost in a world run by uncaring corporations. Also it calls out to all of us that struggle with personal demons and/or dreams we have deferred. ~*~LEB~*~
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Did not want to finish it. Would not recommend it.
Maximillian More than 1 year ago
For a short book, it took a long time to read. As I think about it, I should have pitched it. What a waste of time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Dear American Airlines" is not only, as you might think, a diatribe against an airline disguised as a letter; it's much more than that. It's a man at the end of his rope, stuck at O'Hare Airport due to a delayed flight, musing over his life's low (many) and high (few) points which brought him there, on a flight to California to give his daughter away at a wedding. The man in question is a failed poet from New Orleans, now a translator. The richness of the novel comes from his alcoholic troubled past and his attempts to make amends with his wife and daughter. Stunningly written, Jonathan Miles's acerbic novel is worth reading. It only falls with an excerpted "translated text" meant to serve as a counterpoint to the translator's own life, but that's a minor flaw. Recommended reading.
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lovetoreadAR More than 1 year ago
Off beat and off the wall. Funny jokes (colorful to coarse language and sensitive themes peppered at times throughout) and pieces of a man's life, the story turns downright random in spots, but still amusing and fitting in a bizarre way. At other times it was poignant and unbearably sad. A maimed life and family dynamic, bittersweet. It's not the typical cliched happy ending, it leaves you wanting yet satisfied.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an astonishing novel. It is funny, witty, acerbic, mesmerizing, hilarious, hypnotic, dazzling, sad, and at times heart-breaking and very touching, all at once! How did Jonathan Miles accomplish this feat? Through the flight of his imagination and the magic of his pen, I suppose. Written in lively, abrasive, masculine, snappy, and yet strangely affecting prose, this book will delight, provoke, entertain and sadden the reader. Benjamin Ford, the protagonist of this novel, is flying from New York to Los Angeles to attend his daughter Stella¿s wedding. But in transit, at the O¿Hare airport, his connecting flight is suddenly cancelled, stranding him. He begins to worry that he will be late for the wedding. While waiting for more than eight hours at the air port ¿ and smoking seventeen cigarettes - for the next flight, he starts writing a letter of complaint to the American Airlines, demanding a refund of $392.68, the price of the round trip airfare. This letter of complaint grows in length, and matures into a funny, witty, mesmerizing novel. Benjamin, middle-aged, is a poet and writer he translates Polish novels into English. While writing the letter of complaint, he ponders about his failed marriages, his misdirected and ruined life, the time he wasted drinking heavily, his estranged daughter, his bed-ridden mother and the cramped apartment he shares with her. He also dwells on Walenty Mozelewski, the protagonist of the novel ¿The Free State of Trieste,¿ which he has been translating from Polish. Walenty has lost a leg to mortar shell in a war, and so he is physically crippled. Benjamin is crippled too. He is emotionally crippled, a victim mostly of self-inflicted wounds. Jonathan Mile's prose is mesmerizing: ¿In that eightish-hour period I've smoked seventeen cigarettes which wouldn't be notable save for the fact that the dandy Hudson News outlets here don't stock my brand so I'll soon be forced to switch to another, and while that shouldn't upset me it does. In fact, it enrages me. Here's my life in dangly tatters and I can't even enjoy this merest of my pleasures. Several hours ago a kid in a Cubs windbreaker bummed one of mine and I swear if I spy him again I'll smash him like a Timex. Cough it up, you turd. But then all this talk of smoking is giving me the familiar itch, so if you'll excuse me for a moment I'm off to the sidewalk, as required by law, to scratch it.¿ It is very rare to come across a first novel as charming and impressive as this. Jonathan Miles is an astonishing writer.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
one of which is actually right there or took a ride to the loop and got a train
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
enjoyed the main thought of the book