Death By Probability

Death By Probability

by Urno Barthel, Art Chester

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Overview

It caused a hell of a fuss when they found Willard in his office, bloody, splayed out on the floor, chair overturned. Evan Olsson is stunned. Inside a top-secret lab, behind layers of security, his mentor is suddenly and violently dead. Even worse, a mysterious message hints of a deadly plot that threatens the US electrical network. How can Evan deal with all this when he's got problems of his own? His love life stinks, and his closest friend is a computer program barely smart enough to say "hello."

Evan takes over the mentor's project and with a reluctant FBI partner uses computer science and nanotechnology to unravel the mystery. With his personal safety at risk he tracks the mastermind to the Malibu area, but the criminals up the stakes by paralyzing a regional energy network, accelerating their plans for a devastating national attack just days away. Nature disrupts everything with a disaster that helps Evan unmask the criminals but requires him to flee for his life.

Death By Probability pursues a mysterious death to its ultimate secret. Technology and fringe science, friendship and romance, computer intelligence and human frailty -- all these help solve a mystery that builds to a fast-paced climax.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940148147503
Publisher: Outskirts Press, Inc.
Publication date: 01/14/2014
Series: Evan Olsson , #1
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 279
File size: 1 MB

About the Author

Urno Barthel is the pen name of Art Chester, a physicist turned technology manager turned writer. His characters are based on real scientists whose quiet lives are disrupted by terror and murder. Art invites you to his website, which offers commentary about science in our lives, and fiction about scientists:



After many years in Malibu, California, Art now spends his time in Michigan, New York state and Hawaii.

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Death By Probability 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Valerie Rouse for Readers' Favorite Death by Probability is a suspense novel surrounding the death of Willard, a scientist at the HAL facility.  The main character, Evan Olsson, is thrown into the deep end when he tries to solve this murder mystery. Evan was being trained by Willard for about a month and, before his death, Willard sent Evan an encrypted video message informing him of the work he wanted Evan to continue for him. Willard had apparently stumbled upon some evidence leading to an impending dangerous coup or disaster. He wanted Evan to dig further so as to expose the perpetrators. The intrigue is set in motion when Evan seeks to trim his list of likely suspects. Almost all of the science lab employees were eligible. The process of elimination was very tedious. Evan deliberated as to the motives and interpersonal work relationships of each co-worker to solve this murder. Author Urno Barthel also reveals the development of Evan’s non-existent love life to one of passionate togetherness with Lissa, the sister of one of Evan’s work mates. Death by Probability is a well developed book which is very intriguing. The pace is a bit slow at first, but as the action surrounding Willard’s death steps up, the plot becomes more enthralling. I love the way in which Mr. Barthel switches between Evan’s work life and love life throughout the novel. This makes Evan seem more realistic and it also gives you the impression that human interaction is vital to our social existence as humans. In contrast to Evan’s consistent dialogues with his personal computer, Al, it is gratifying to see Evan have an emotionally satisfying personal relationship at last. This aspect of man vs machine has far-reaching implications. According to Mr. Barthel’s story, the development of computer technology is both good and bad. It can easily replace the need for human interaction as well as create intentional disasters akin to the 9/11 World Trade Center tragedy. Death by Probability is an interesting read concerning technological advancement. I recommend it to all readers looking for a suspenseful high.