The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Other Stories

The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Other Stories

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Overview

The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Other Stories by Leo Tolstoy

Leo Tolstoy combined detailed physical description with perceptive psychological insight to sweep aside the sham of surface appearances and lay bare man's intimate gestures, acts, and thoughts. Murder and sacrifice...greed and devotion...lust and affection...vanity and love -- one by one, in this volume of great stories, Tolstoy dissects the basic drives, emotions, and motives of ordinary people searching for self-knowledge and spiritual perfection. Chekhov said, "Of authors my favorite is Tolstoy." And Turgenev "marveled at the strength of his huge talent...It sends a cold shudder even down my back...He is a master, a master."

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781605013046
Publisher: MobileReference
Publication date: 01/01/2010
Series: Mobi Classics
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 169,911
File size: 224 KB

About the Author

Nicolas Pasternak Slater has translated several works by Boris Pasternak, most recently The Family Correspondence, 1921-1960 (Hoover Press, 2010). For Oxford World's Classics he has translated Lermontov's A Hero of Our Time. Andrew Kahn has written widely on Russian literature. His books include The Cambridge Companion to Pushkin (2006) and Pushkin's Lyric Intelligence (OUP, 2008, pbk 2012). For Oxford World's Classics he has edited Pushkin's The Queen of Spades and Other Stories, Montesquieu's Persian Letters. and Lermontov's A Hero of Our Time.

Date of Birth:

September 9, 1828

Date of Death:

November 20, 1910

Place of Birth:

Tula Province, Russia

Place of Death:

Astapovo, Russia

Education:

Privately educated by French and German tutors; attended the University of Kazan, 1844-47

Customer Reviews

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The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Other Stories 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I liked the book a lot. It was a sad story about how a man died but they never told what he died of because they never knew. I loved how they gave his feelings and just didn't leave you in blind about them. It was interesting how they didn't have a fairy tale ending. That is always nice when it is an ending as it was. I haven't read the other two stories in the book, but I am sure they are just as well written.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This beautiful festival was made by Jesse and Aqua. Please enjoy the rainbow flame torches as we celebrate Valentines day. <p>Please no godmoding. <p>Please try to avoid spelling isues as much as you can.<p>Tell that special person what you like about them under the soothing moonlit sky <p>Please refraim from using foul language. <p> Dancing starts at 9:30 and festival starts at 9:00 <p>Thanks and have a wonderful night here at FlameFest. -Jesse Clark.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Was ok not that big of a fan. This book is mainly about death.
Robyn_hood More than 1 year ago
Ivan Ilyich must take stock of his life as he slowly dies. Most of his life, he has wasted on worrying over needless things - nice clothes, high society, the right house - to realize that it all meant nothing. I had always shied away from Tolstoy fearing that he was too overwhelming for me to read, but I found this existential novella compelling and deeply moving. The story moves quickly for his life had little substance; in fact, his fall was probably the most significant thing that had ever occurred. The novella picks up as he begins to suffer, and as he slowly comes to an epiphany about the meaning of life. This story lingers with me, and it reminds us not to whittle away our on the things that matter least. Everyman...we can't take our goods with us to the grave. We can take our good deeds and good hearts.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The first story in this bok is what I've read so far, it's great! I love Tolstoy now! 'Happy Ever After' is depressing but sadly beautiful in it's own way. The characters are real and you really want to hit them sometimes (or Marya any way!)!