Deep South (Anna Pigeon Series #8)

Deep South (Anna Pigeon Series #8)

by Nevada Barr
4.2 26

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reissue)

$8.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Monday, October 2 , Order now and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.

Overview

Deep South (Anna Pigeon Series #8) by Nevada Barr

Nevada Barr's ever-popular Anna Pigeon series is consistently praised as "exceptional" (Denver Post), "stunning" (Seattle Times), and "superb" (New York Times Book Review). In Deep South, Park Ranger Anna Pigeon heads to Mississippi, only to encounter terrible secrets in the heart of the south…

Anna Pigeon finally gives in to her bureaucratic clock-and signs on for a promotion. Next thing she knows, she's knee-deep in mud and Mississippi. Not exactly what she had in mind. Almost immediately, as the new district ranger on the Natchez Trace, Anna discovers the body of a young prom queen near a country cemetery, a sheet around her head, a noose around her neck. It's a bizarre twist on a best-forgotten past of frightening racial undertones. As fast as the ever-encroaching kudzu vines of the region, the roots of this story run deep-and threaten to suffocate anyone in the way, including Anna...

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780425178959
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 01/30/2001
Series: Anna Pigeon Series , #8
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 164,358
Product dimensions: 4.20(w) x 6.80(h) x 1.02(d)
Lexile: 840L (what's this?)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Nevada Barr is the award-winning author of thirteen previous Anna Pigeon mysteries, including the New York Times bestsellers Hard Truth and High Country. She lives in New Orleans.

Hometown:

Clinton, Mississippi

Date of Birth:

March 1, 1952

Place of Birth:

Yerington, Nevada

Education:

B.A., Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, 1974; M.A., University of California at Irvine, 1977

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Deep South (Anna Pigeon Series #8) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This particular Anna Pigeon book was pretty good but the author should have done more homework on what it is like in Mississippi. I can only assume that Bar is a Northerner who refuses to understand the proper use of the term "ya'll." I also resent how she made the state appear as a place crawling with racism. Maybe she should have spent a little quality time in the south doing her research before trying to write about it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nan_Russl More than 1 year ago
Nevada Barra is amazing in her ability to catch regional characteristics without falling into stereotypes. Her characters have their own uniqueness within their own settings. Refreshingly, her characters are not simply divided into "good" and "bad", but are much richer and more complex than those limitations.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
GeneseeValley More than 1 year ago
If you would enjoy a verbal tour of our national parks, this series is for you. Barr truly does a fine job painting pictures for the reader. Of this series, Deep South has a depth to the storyline that is dark and well written. While the park details are as visual as other Barr tales, this story is more startling. Great book and series for rainy days and personal entertainment.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
THIS IS MY FAVORITE NEVADA BARR STORY SO FAR. THIS MYSTERY KEEPS THE READER GUESSING RIGHT UP TO THE LAST CHAPTER. GOOD USE OF HUMOR WITH A SOUTHERN SETTING.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Nevada Barr delivers another great read. From the very beginning she grabs your attention and holds it until the very last page. I recommend this book to anyone who loves nature and a good mystery. I hope there are more stories featuring the trio of Anna, Taco the Lab and Piedmont the cat.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fawnkit is claimed by me!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'd like to rp Cerisekit! ~Spirit
Guest More than 1 year ago
Nevada Barr is a terrific writer. She has the ability to bring you to near claustrophobia as you wriggle your way through a cave miles underground (Blind Descent), feel the smoke clinging to your clothes from a forest fire (Firestorm), come up gasping for air from an underwater dive (Superior Death) & swear off beef forever (Track of the Cat). In ¿Deep South¿ Barr brings us to Natchez Trace National Park, Mississippi¿a place I¿ve never been & no doubt won¿t be going in this lifetime, yet I¿ve been there. District Ranger, Anna Pigeon has just arrived with her dog, Taco & cat, Piedmont as the park¿s first female ranger Before she¿s able to establish friendly relations with her co-workers, she stumbles on the body of a young girl. She has a white hood around her head & a rope around her neck. It looks like the work of a KKK group, but looks can be deceiving, as Anna discovers. From there the story runs the gamut: teenage angst, racism, sexism, drugs & alcohol, homosexuality & Civil War re-enactors. I¿ve read every book in the Anna Pigeon series, & this was not my favorite setting or subject matter. Yet, Barr¿s writing is compelling enough to keep me reading & actually enjoying myself at the same time. Barr is a master at synonym & gets better with every book. In one scene Anna arrives at the rundown rural home of the victim¿s parents. Barr uses the following synonym: ¿A decrepit barn, with derelict automobiles nosed up to the weathered wood like piglets to a sow, stood to one side.¿ Terrific! The character of Anna Pigeon is successful because she is flawed just enough to be real; nearly superhuman at times, yet not so much so that she doesn¿t remain in the end, vulnerable. And rather than being disappointed, we love her for it. In her usual fashion, the author parades her varied cast of characters before us. None are so perfect that they couldn¿t have somehow been involved, leaving us suspecting nearly everyone, yet never really sure until the end. I always feel kinship with Anna¿s love of nature & wildlife. She says in so many words the way I feel about nature & those who choose to defile it, about Wildlife & those who don¿t respect its right to exist. This is a good book. Anna Pigeon fans will not be disappointed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Attitude not miles counts when measuring the distance between Colorado's Mesa Verde National Park and the Port Gibson District of the Natchez Trace Parkway. Federal Park law enforcement official Anna Pigeon learns that lesson when she accepts a promotion transfer to the South. However, Anna soon learns that the 'ole boy' network still thrives in the South, especially when she concludes that her all male deputies resent working for a mere female. Their sexism reaches dangerous proportions when they refuse to provide Anna back up during a potentially emergency situation...... Anna's sense of oppression fully surfaces when someone kills a teenage white girl following the prom. The victim was stomped to death. A white sheet with slits cut out for the eyes covered her face. A rope hung loosely around her neck. Someone made it look like the work of the KKK. As she begins her investigation into the racially charged crime, Anna learns how deep hatred flows in the hearts and souls of some bigots.... Surprisingly, DEEP SOUTH has a literary feel that counterbalances the repulsive almost overwhelming loathing that is the creed of some of the characters. This juxtaposition adds chilling drama to a well-designed mystery. Anna's adjustment to her new home augments the tense story line by her battle with racism and sexism. Nevada Barr condemns the rural south for its deep-rooted prejudices, even as the author applauds the fact that discrimination is more in the open than the de facto segregation of most of the rest of the country. The openness and honest feelings allows Anna to deal with anything thrown her way. The social commentary cleverly wraps inside an excellent police procedural without slowing down the main plot.