Delta 7

Delta 7

by John Cathcart

Paperback

$8.95
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Overview

For 20 years, John Carter served as a USAF fighter pilot and attaché. Everything appeared to be on track for a comfortable retirement. Without warning, however, his world is turned upside-down after a casual conversation during a layover in the Caribbean island of Grenada sets into motion a series of events that threaten to inalterably change-or perhaps even end-his life.

Out of the blue, an old friend turns up to impart a bizarre and almost unbelievable story... and a warning. Within a matter of hours, Carter discovers that his military friends and comrades are disappearing.

With the help of a beautiful and enigmatic woman from his past, Carter returns to Colombia in a frantic attempt to unravel the truth in a world ruled by violence, illicit drugs and money. Unbeknownst to Carter, shadowy players are already caught up in this high-stakes and deadly poker game. Relying on his super-secret attaché training, Carter tries to stay alive in a frantic hunt for allies... and answers.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781438243900
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 07/07/2008
Pages: 214
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.49(d)

About the Author

John Cathcart was born in North Carolina, and lived in Delaware and New Jersey during his youth. Before graduating from George Washington University in 1977, he studied for two years in Paris, France and Monterrey, Mexico.

Within a year of getting his degree in International Relations, Cathcart had married and joined the United States Air Force. After earning his USAF pilot's wings, he flew the B52 and the F-111. He later served as a military attaché, in Colombia and Venezuela. In both countries, he flew the embassy's twin-engine prop C-12: the military version of the Super King Air.

For the remainder of his military career, he worked in a series of staff assignments, including the Office of the Secretary of Defense (Special Operations & Low-Intensity Conflict) at the Pentagon and the US Southern Command. While at Southcom (both in Panama and in Miami), he served as Assistant Executive Officer to Generals Wesley K. Clark, and Charles E. Wilhelm. After a twenty-year military career, he retired at the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

In 1999 Cathcart was hired by American Airlines and is currently flying the 737 from American's base in Miami, Florida.

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Delta 7 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
KevinJoseph More than 1 year ago
John Cathcart's Delta 7 is a well-constructed thriller, employing short punchy chapters and multiple points of view to tell the story of a Colombian drug deal for the ages and its impact on a wide cast of characters. Air-Force-Captain-turned-commercial-jet-pilot John Carter stumbles upon the plot during a stopover in Grenada, when he inquires about an old acquaintance who heads the Grenadian Coast Guard. It turns out this old friend, and several others in Carter's former military circles, have cashed in their morals and joined forces with Colombian drug dealers. As these old friends begin to die under questionable circumstances and Carter's own life is threatened, he scrambles to find the truth before he too becomes a casualty. Cathcart's work exudes authenticity, and his inside knowledge of military and homeland security agencies, as well as the drug trade, make it easy to buy into this thriller. Like many first novelists, however, some of the writing has a mechanical, workmanlike feel to it, as Cathcart too often feels the need to tell the reader what a character is feeling or point out when a joke has been told. The oscillating points of view also disrupt the flow of the narrative and create a predictability to some of the plot since we usually know what the other characters are doing and planning. The ending, however, is extremely well executed, injecting a couple of powerful twists, one of which I did not see coming at all. At bottom, this is solid military thriller that should appeal to fans of the genre and those with an interest in the Colombian drug problem.
Rob_Ballister More than 1 year ago
Former military attaché John Carter's friends are disappearing without a trace, and he's worried he might be next. Most of his contacts from his attaché days seem to be connected somehow with some major drug dealings, and the only ones he can trust are already dead. With his girlfriend Gloria, who has some secrets of her own, John tries to get to the bottom of the mystery before the drug lords get to him. John Cathcart's first book, DELTA 7, is a well-written and fast moving story heavily influenced by Cathcart's own career as an Air Force pilot and a defense attaché. The author weaves an intricate story that spans two countries, developing a host of believable characters and creating a very plausible story. And when he finally wraps it up, he does so with a pleasant, unexpected twist that makes it that much better. The book is well presented, though be prepared for a smaller font. The chapters break up the book nicely, and there is plenty of dialogue to keep the story moving. Fans of law-enforcement and counter drug works will enjoy this book. Well done to the author.
KevinJoseph on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
John Cathcart's Delta 7 is a well-constructed thriller, employing short punchy chapters and multiple points of view to tell the story of a Colombian drug deal for the ages and its impact on a wide cast of characters. Air-Force-Captain-turned-commercial-jet-pilot John Carter stumbles upon the plot during a stopover in Grenada, when he inquires about an old acquaintance who heads the Grenadian Coast Guard. It turns out this old friend, and several others in Carter's former military circles, have cashed in their morals and joined forces with Colombian drug dealers. As these old friends begin to die under questionable circumstances and Carter's own life is threatened, he scrambles to find the truth before he too becomes a casualty.Cathcart's work exudes authenticity, and his inside knowledge of military and homeland security agencies, as well as the drug trade, make it easy to buy into this thriller. Like many first novelists, however, some of the writing has a mechanical, workmanlike feel to it, as Cathcart too often feels the need to tell the reader what a character is feeling or point out when a joke has been told. The oscillating points of view also disrupt the flow of the narrative and create a predictability to some of the plot since we usually know what the other characters are doing and planning. The ending, however, is extremely well executed, injecting a couple of powerful twists, one of which I did not see coming at all.At bottom, this is solid military thriller that should appeal to fans of the genre and those with an interest in the Colombian drug problem.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago