Demon Theory

Demon Theory

by Stephen Graham Jones
3.6 5

NOOK Book(eBook)

$5.49 $5.99 Save 8% Current price is $5.49, Original price is $5.99. You Save 8%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Overview

Demon Theory by Stephen Graham Jones

Following an unnerving phone call from his diabetic mother on Halloween night, Hale and six of his med school classmates return to the house where his sister disappeared years ago — only to find a chilling surprise in store for them. Written as a literary film treatment and littered with pop culture references and footnotes, 'Demon Theory' is a refreshing addition to the 'intelligent horror' genre.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781596929784
Publisher: MacAdam/Cage Publishing, Incorporated
Publication date: 05/22/2010
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 421,267
File size: 487 KB

About the Author

About the Author: Stephen Graham Jones is the author of 'All the Beautiful Sinners', 'The Bird Is Gone: A Manifesto', 'The Fast Red Road: A Plainsong', 'Bleed into Me: A Book of Stories' and most recently 'Growing up Dead in Texas'. He is an associate professor of English at Texas Tech University.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Demon Theory 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If Stephen Graham Jones¿ wickedly clever 'Demon Theory' were to ever be made into an actual film, the witty tagline might go something like this: 'Someone has taken his love of MLA too far'. Culled from the fictional case notes of the fictional Dr. Neider at the equally imaginary Owl Creek Mental Facilities, 'Demon Theory' is presented as a three-part novelization of the movie trilogy 'The Devil Inside', based on the (you guessed it) fictional best-selling novel inspired by said notes. Part literary film treatment, part pop culture lexicon, 'Demon Theory' tells a triptych of interconnected stories (imagined here as sequels) concerning a group of Midwestern med school pals and their encounters with the nasty titular creatures. Imagine throwing 'Jeepers Creepers', the 'Scream' films, TV¿s 'Grey¿s Anatomy', and Paul Thomas Anderson¿s 'Magnolia' into a blender and mixing on high. The layers of Jones' narrative unfurl at just the right moments throughout when the reader¿s mind has been gloriously stretched to its outer limits keeping track of this richly plotted tale. Using liberal doses of footnotes as the literary equivalent of pop-up videos, Jones creates a blood-soaked textbook of pop culture reference and epitomized post-modernism with 'Demon Theory'. He fashions a unique literary hybrid ¿ part novel, part reference book ¿ and seemingly satirizes the post-'Scream' self-awareness of the horror genre while lovingly chronicling it down to its last obscure nuance one footnoted annotation at a time. But in between the definition of retroactive continuity, Clive Barker quotes, deliberations of who rightfully deserves the first scream queen title, and the etymology of the word bumf..k, Jones powers through a gripping narrative rich with convincing dialogue, atmospheric suspense, and an ample gore quotient. Lazy readers beware 'Demon Theory' is the anti-beach read. Jones challenges with an intricate read, at times frustrating and distracting until readers hit their stride shifting from footnote to narrative and back again against the backdrop of screenplay jargon. Although Jones offers no easy mass-market thrill rides here, the payoffs are well worth the workout of little gray cells. The ingenuity of 'Demon Theory' is the true marvel at work here, presenting as the intellectual literary cousin of Wes Craven¿s 'Scream' trilogy. This cerebral terror trip is made even more so by Jones¿ staunch refusal to lay his cards out on the table as to whether 'Demon Theory' is an application of intellectualism to the horror genre or tongue-in-cheek boyhood homage to a genre he clearly loves. No, he¿s far too skilled a writer for that, his 'Demon Theory' far too superior a novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago