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Overview

Detection Challenges in Clinical Diagnostics by Pankaj Vadgama

There are many remaining challenges impeding future progress in field of Clinical Diagnostics. This book presents a technical assessment and vision of clinical leaders, scoping the clinical and other diagnostic needs and the bottle-necks in their cognate fields. Issues of real environmental biological measurements from the perspective of the end-user are presented and thus the book serves to inform the direction of the fundamental scientific efforts. Both editors are experienced practitioners within the biosensor technology and are involved first-hand with the healthcare and clinical applications of detection science.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781849736121
Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry, The
Publication date: 09/30/2013
Series: Detection Science Series , #2
Pages: 246
Product dimensions: 6.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Professor Pankaj Vadgama's particular interest is biosensors, where he has developed permselective, biocompatible, and biomimetic polymeric membranes capable of stable transduction in whole blood and tissue. Both in vivo and in vitro work has been undertaken, including the use of miniaturized devices for glucose and lactate monitoring, immunosensing, and interrogation of tissue-material interactions. Current research work includes interfacial problems relating to sensor/biomaterial contact with the biomatrix, and the generalizable insights that may emerge from this. Projects include: spider silk for tissue engineering, materials for implantable electronic devices, microfluidic based separation, cell-surface interactions, biomaterial degradation dynamics, conducting polymers as biomaterials, tissue bioreactor design, and cochlear implant electrodes.

Dr. Serban Peteu's research interest is in biosensors, where he has advanced methods to detect metal ions or monitor nitro-oxidative stress in biological fluids. Both electrochemical and optochemical sensing have been investigated, furthermore the response being enhanced via hybrid organic-inorganic nano-architectures. Present work involves nanowire based bio-catalytic interfaces for electrochemical and field-effect sensors. Projects include: semiconductor based lancet type biosensors, electroactive polymers soft actuators, bioreactors designed and fabricated for vaccine research and for water remediation, other equipment and devices to improve the quality of life.

Professor Pankaj Vadgama's particular interest is biosensors, where he has developed permselective, biocompatible, and biomimetic polymeric membranes capable of stable transduction in whole blood and tissue. Both in vivo and in vitro work has been undertaken, including the use of miniaturized devices for glucose and lactate monitoring, immunosensing, and interrogation of tissue-material interactions. Current research work includes interfacial problems relating to sensor/biomaterial contact with the biomatrix, and the generalizable insights that may emerge from this. Projects include: spider silk for tissue engineering, materials for implantable electronic devices, microfluidic based separation, cell-surface interactions, biomaterial degradation dynamics, conducting polymers as biomaterials, tissue bioreactor design, and cochlear implant electrodes.

Dr. Sub Reddy (C.Chem. MRSC) obtained his first class degree in Chemistry from the University of Manchester. He received his Ph.D. in Membrane-based Electrochemical Biosensing from the same University (1996). His post-doctoral research interests have included the development of quartz crystal-based biosensors, operating in the liquid phase (University of Wales, Bangor; 1994-1997) and the development of application-specific odour sensors (UMIST, Manchester; 1997-1998).

Dr. Reddy was Senior Lecturer in Applied Analytical Chemistry at the University of Surrey and recently moved to the University of Central Lancashire as Senior Lecturer in Analytical Chemistry. Current research interests include the development of smart, permselective and biocompatible molecular imprinted polymers and membrane materials for the sensor/sample interface and the advancement of smart materials-based electrochemical, quartz crystal and optical sensors for medical, food and environmental applications. He is particularly interested in developing hydrogel-based molecularly imprinted polymers (HydroMIPs) for the determination of protein markers and other biomarkers and construction of biosensors.

Dr. Serban Peteu's research interest is in biosensors, where he has advanced methods to detect metal ions or monitor nitro-oxidative stress in biological fluids. Both electrochemical and optochemical sensing have been investigated, furthermore the response being enhanced via hybrid organic-inorganic nano-architectures. Present work involves nanowire based bio-catalytic interfaces for electrochemical and field-effect sensors. Projects include: semiconductor based lancet type biosensors, electroactive polymers soft actuators, bioreactors designed and fabricated for vaccine research and for water remediation, other equipment and devices to improve the quality of life.

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Detection Challenges in Clinical Diagnostics 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book "Detection Challenges in Clinical Diagnostics" edited by Vadgama & Peteu is the second volume in the "Detection Science" Series, edited by the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). Throughout this book, leading researchers from academia and clinical practitioners are bringing the reader up to date with the fast evolving technology. The focus is on the diagnostics needs and main bottlenecks or challenges when “dealing with the world of real biological measurement – especially from the perspective of a commonly neglected expert: the end user.” Following a logical progression, this book looks at the big picture of the clinical diagnostics both in laboratory and bedside, continues with the blood glucose sensors, followed by the disease diagnostics biomarkers and next dives into more challenges form the different case studies of: the implanted sensor long-term biocompatibility, the quantification of peroxynitrite as an important nitro-oxidative species, the correct classification of patients at risk for myelodysplastic syndrome, the early cancer diagnosis via fibre-optic Raman interrogation, and the complex signal handling with arrays. More specifically, the Chapter 1 (Thompson et al) and Chapter 2 (Vadgama et al) outline the Clinical Diagnostics, both in the laboratory and at the bedside. The progress and challenges of the blood glucose biosensors is illustrated in Chapter 3 (Wang and Hu). Chapter 4 (Gaspar et al) offers a critical overview of the recent progress and many challenges in electrochemical detection of disease-related diagnostic biomarkers. Chapter 5 (Meyerhoff et al) is focusing on the challenges of long-term biocompatibility for the implanted sensors. The case of more exotic, short-lived radical species such as peroxynitrite is featured in Chapter 6 (by Peteu and Szunerits) with the significant difficulties of measurement in vivo. The myelodysplastic syndromes is illustrated in Chapter 7 (by McNamara et al) with its major challenge: how to correctly classify and “risk stratify” the patients. Chapter 8 (by Barr et al) reports on Raman for non-invasive early cancer diagnosis with fibre-optic interrogation as an in situ potential surgical adjunct. Signal handling with arrays is well exemplified in Chapter 9 (by Kendall et al). I found this to be very good and quite a thought-provoking book, with each chapter offering a fresh view of the state of the art and related future challenges for the future of specific chemical sensors and clinical diagnostics.