Devil in the Countryside

Devil in the Countryside

by Cory Barclay

Paperback

$12.98
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Monday, February 25

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781541048607
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 01/05/2017
Series: Of Witches and Werewolves , #1
Pages: 362
Sales rank: 1,007,586
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.81(d)

About the Author

As far back as he can remember, Cory Barclay has always loved the "big picture" questions. How much knowledge did humanity lose when the Library of Alexandria was burned down? Why has the concept of Heaven remained intact, in one form or another, throughout most of human history and how has it impacted life on Earth?

And even before that, when he first began writing stories in grade school, he's been fascinated with histories and mysteries. Whether Norse mythology, the Dark Ages, or the conquests of great leaders, Cory's been that kid who wants to know what's shaped our world and write about it. Especially the great unsolved mysteries.

So Devil in the Countryside was a natural for him.

Born and raised in San Diego, he graduated from University of California, Santa Cruz, where he studied Creative Writing and Modern Literary Studies. He's also a songwriter and guitarist, and - no surprise - many of his songs explore the same topics he writes about - the great mysteries of our crazy world.

Devil in the Countryside is his second novel and he's hard at work on its sequel.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Devil in the Countryside 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
lauralovesreviewingLT More than 1 year ago
The story takes place in Germany. The year is 1588. People are being murdered, torn to pieces in what looks like a vicious animal attack. Rumors abound that the Werewolf Of Bedburg had returned. Investigator Heinrich Franz is tasked with discovering who or what is behind the killings and putting an end to it. He’s joined by three people who, whether willingly or by choices not their own, combine their knowledge to kill the beast and save their town. This book reads like a movie. I felt like I was watching events as they took place. The settings were so visually written and it was steeped in suspense and horror as the characters delved into the mystery and more people were torn apart. The historical aspect was well written. Especially the religious and political agendas of the times. It was a bloody battle on both sides. And there is quite the cast of characters. I wasn’t sure any of them could be called good people. They all had secrets and hidden agendas. And is there really a werewolf? I wasn’t sure right up til the end.
JenacideByBibliophile More than 1 year ago
Disclaimer: I was sent an ARC copy of this book by the author, Cory Barclay, for an honest review. Once again, I am PLEASANTLY surprised with a book that is completely out of the genre that I usually read. This story was AMAZING! I found myself having immense trouble putting it down and doing adult things such as going to work, or sleeping. The writing is perfection. It gives the reader the necessary balance of description and detail, while also eloquently weaving a tale of fantasy and realism. Based loosely on actual events that took place in Germany over a 20 year span, Devil in the Countryside transports the reader to 1588 as murders in Bedburg start to rise. Fear spreads quickly through the town as gruesome and mangled bodies are found in the countryside, and threats against protestant reform begin to plague the Christian ruled town. As Investigator Heinrich Franz looks into the murders, he enlists the help of a hunter by the name of Georg Stieghart who has a past of being quite vicious. This story also follows Father Nicholas Dieter of the church in Bedburg, and young Sybil Griswold who is the daughter of a wealthy farmer. While the investigator tries to hunt down the Werewolf of Bedburg, the church tries to fight off Protestants from overtaking the town and the minds of their people. Though I gave you guys a little description up there, I’m going to explain a little bit more about these characters/events so that you really get the idea. Probably the COOLEST thing about this book is the fact that it is based on true events. In 1589 a trial was held for a man that was presumed to be the famous Werewolf of Bedburg, who was accused of murder and cannibalism. Shocked? Me too. The fact that these people actually thought that a man was turning into a werewolf and slashing bodies to pieces is just…beyond me. The again, this was also a time when everyone thought witches were casting spells and dealing in dark magic…and here I thought my generation was cuckoo. Heinrich Franz is the investigator that is put in charge of finding out who/what the Werewolf of Bedburg is, and he seems to go to any lengths to make someone responsible. I really can’t pinpoint my feelings for this character. He is an evil and emotionally unattached man, but I quite like his ruthlessness and cunning behavior. He is the type of person that will do ANYTHING to close a case, especially if that means framing someone in the process. Georg Stieghart is truly my favorite character in this story. He comes off as a drunken idiot most of the time, but he proves to be a very strong-willed and intelligent person. As Georg seeks revenge for the death of his family, who he assumes is the Werewolf, he assists the investigator and helps him hunt the killer down. The relationship between these two characters is fairly comical. They both act friendly towards one another and share news that they have, but they also don’t trust each other and have their own agendas. I enjoyed how the story turned out for Georg and how his character makes a complete 180. He loses some of his savagery and turns into a truly upstanding person. Sybil Griswold is the daughter of wealthy farmer Peter Griswold. Sybil goes through a lot of dark events in this story, and I commend her character for taking everything in stride. To read the full review, head over to my blog: Jenacidebybibliophile.wordpress.com