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Diamond Jim Dandy and the Sheriff
     

Diamond Jim Dandy and the Sheriff

5.0 1
by Sarah Burell, Bryan Langdo (Illustrator)
 
When a snake slithers into the sleepy town of Dustpan, Texas, the sheriff knows for darned sure that it shouldn’t be allowed to stay—even if it’s really a friendly kind of rattler. No matter if the neighborly reptile has managed to charm the customers at the local restaurant, entertain the Ladies Sewing and join the kids for playtime. After all, that

Overview

When a snake slithers into the sleepy town of Dustpan, Texas, the sheriff knows for darned sure that it shouldn’t be allowed to stay—even if it’s really a friendly kind of rattler. No matter if the neighborly reptile has managed to charm the customers at the local restaurant, entertain the Ladies Sewing and join the kids for playtime. After all, that’s the law of the west: NO RATTLESNAKES!

But when little Idie Mae Tumbleweed crawls her way over to dangerous Deadman’s Gulch, the rattler proves he’s one jim-dandy hero.

Author Sarah Burell and illustrator Bryan Langdo have whipped up one very funny wild-west tale with a unique new star.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
“Nothing exciting ever happened in Dustpan, Texas,” opens this folksy tale by newcomer Burell. Things are so dull that “kids drifted off in school and drooled all over their books” and the idle sheriff baby-sits to pass the time. When a smiling rattlesnake slithers into town, the sheriff concedes that it seems like “a neighborly sort of snake,” yet announces, “you're not welcome here, pardner.” Paying no heed, the reptile proceeds to entertain the residents, performing tricks and playing with the kids. Annoyed to be proved wrong, the sheriff is ready to escort the snake out of town when he realizes that Ida Mae, the young'un he was babysitting, has disappeared. It comes as no surprise that the snake saves the baby, who's perched perilously on the edge of Deadman's Gulch. Langdo's (Pastry School in Paris) chipper, homespun cartoons bring additional comedic dimension—particularly enjoyable are scenes of Ida Mae scribbling away on “Wanted” posters and of the snake giving babies a snakeyback ride. The sheriff is never very convincing as a gruff hard-liner, nor is his conversion ever in doubt. Ages 4-7. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—A friendly and frolicsome rattlesnake shakes things up when he slithers into small, dull Dustpan, TX. Despite making friends with the menfolk, ladies, and babies, he is run out of town by the sheriff because "it's the Law of the West." However, when little Idie Mae (whom the sheriff was babysitting "just to pass the time") goes missing, the rattler (with his pearly fangs) assists in saving the day and everyone declares him to be one "jim-dandy" snake. This charming tale has bright, appealing, kid-friendly illustrations. The lively dialogue combined with the satisfying ending will serve as an excellent storytime read-aloud.—Madeline J. Bryant, Los Angeles Public Library
Kirkus Reviews
Is Dustpan, Texas, big enough for both the sheriff and a rattlesnake? This small Western town is so sleepy, the sheriff does a lot of babysitting, "to pass the time." When a rattlesnake slithers through town, the sheriff springs into action, warning the creature he's not welcome. Not long after, the sheriff hears a commotion at Earl's Saloon ("Dang!" he cries. "Something's actually happening in Dustpan!") and moseys over to find the rattler entertaining all the customers, much to the sheriff's ire. The snake has similar success at the ladies' quilting bee and with the children in the playground. Still, the tone-deaf sheriff holds a town meeting to announce his plan to run the rattler out of town. It takes an emergency, during which the snake becomes a hero, to convince the sheriff of the newcomer's sincerity. Langdo's watercolors have an appropriately dusty feel to them, and he outfits the rattler with fetching diamonds and two petite fangs that stick out from his upper lip to add to the amiable foolishness. A valuable message delivered in a droll package. (Picture book. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781402757372
Publisher:
Sterling
Publication date:
04/06/2010
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
823,899
Product dimensions:
10.10(w) x 10.20(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

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Diamond Jim Dandy and the Sheriff 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My son loved this story. It made a snake a really lovable character and he loves stories about the cowboys.