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Dinosaur Farm
     

Dinosaur Farm

by Frann Preston-Gannon
 

It's hard work being a farmer—and even harder running a DINOSAUR FARM! Children will love spending a day on this vibrant farm, filled with appealing prehistoric creatures of every shape and size. They'll follow the farmer from dawn till dusk, through feedings, cleanings, baby hatchings, and finally to a sweet bedtime nighty-night. Who knew dinosaurs could be

Overview

It's hard work being a farmer—and even harder running a DINOSAUR FARM! Children will love spending a day on this vibrant farm, filled with appealing prehistoric creatures of every shape and size. They'll follow the farmer from dawn till dusk, through feedings, cleanings, baby hatchings, and finally to a sweet bedtime nighty-night. Who knew dinosaurs could be so cuddly? With clever dino-touches throughout, Frann Preston-Gannon's picture book will become a perennial favorite. 

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
08/04/2014
“It’s hard work being a farmer.” True enough, but when the farm animals are dinosaurs (along with a few carnivorous-looking plants) the challenges ramp up considerably. Those critters eat a lot and require plenty of elbow grease to stay clean—the manure pile alone boggles the imagination (while also tickling readers’ funny bones, of course). The farmer doesn’t exactly take it all in stride, but he’s diligent and professional from sunup to sundown and still capable of appreciating how “new life is always beginning on a farm.” At book’s end, it’s clear that all the dinosaurs under his care love him—maybe a little too much. Preston-Gannon’s (How to Lose a Lemur) layered images are rendered in rich, loamy colors, and her consistent use of a single plane gives a good sense of a landscape where there’s always another chore to be done. To her great credit, the word “dinosaur” never appears in the text, which makes the improbable scenario even funnier and more meaningful: whether it’s an ant farm or one filled with terrible (but cute) lizards, “Your farm needs you!” Ages 3–5. (Sept.)
From the Publisher
“First published in the UK in 2013, this day-on-the-farm book takes us through a farmer’s chores from sunup to sunset. There’s one huge factor complicating all the chores: dinosaurs. Not very scary-looking but very big, they have overrun the whole dang farm. The farmer uses the second person to describe his duties, starting with how you have to feed the animals: instead of the expected chicks and ducks and geese crowding around, this time it’s a stampede of stegosauruses chasing the farmer and his yummy bale of hay. Next, the farmer washes the necks of looming allosauruses, shovels a small mountain of triceratops manure, and lugs a steak bigger than himself with a T. rex in full, slavering pursuit. The humor comes from the completely deadpan style of the farmer describing the chores, seemingly oblivious to the huge insects, plants, and dinosaurs surrounding him. The collage illustrations add texture and underscore the humor. Dinosaur-crazed children will love this romp.” —Booklist Online
School Library Journal
09/01/2014
PreS-K—Chronicling the daily chores of a farmer, the simple text could apply to a typical farm. The pictures, however, let readers know that this farm is anything but typical. The farmer's day goes as expected: he wakes up early to feed, wash, and clean up after the animals, but the responsibilities are a little different when the animals are all dinosaurs. There are not a lot of chores mentioned, and because there is little text, it is the illustrations that really provide humor and tell the story. At the end of the day, the exhausted farmer forgets to lock the gate, and the dinosaurs crawl into bed with him. The collagelike illustrations are bold in both color and size. The book presents a silly concept, and while the execution can feel forced at times, young children may find humor in the artwork. Both dinosaur books and farm books circulate readily, so this combination title should fare well. Recommended for larger collections.—Emily E. Lazio, The Smithtown Special Library District, NY
Kirkus Reviews
2014-07-29
Daily farm chores are anything but routine when the livestock runs to stegosaurs and the odd T. Rex. Not that you'd be able to tell that last bit from the blandly generic narrative: "It's hard work being a farmer. / You have to wake very early every morning, and you must make sure you have a nice, big breakfast before your day begins." Presaging what's to come, though, that "breakfast" is a soft-boiled egg the size of a small watermelon. As the overalls-clad farmer (more a rancher it would seem) sets about carrying hay and mucking out a mountain of malodorous, brown "mess," each seemingly typical task is witnessed by flocks of smiling dinos (or, in the garden scene, carnivorous-looking flora). Throughout, the farmer looks dismayed in Preston-Gannon's cut-paper collages, and serving T. Rex an oversized steak isn't the only moment he seems one step away from being a goner. In the end, though, it's all really a sweet, rural idyll that ends with the farmer and his prehistoric charges crowded into his moonlit bedroom in a collective snooze. A bit of dino drollery for the diaper-clad. (Picture book. 2-4)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781454911326
Publisher:
Sterling Children's Books
Publication date:
09/02/2014
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
315,252
Product dimensions:
10.70(w) x 10.50(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD610L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Frann Preston-Gannon has worked freelance for a variety of clients that include: Vintage Books, Sunday Publishing, The PRCA, Spears Magazine, Pavilion Books, the Times, and Burt's Bees. She is the author and illustrator of The Journey Home (Pavilion Press) and How to Lose a Lemur (Sterling). In April 2011, Frann became the first UK recipient of a Sendak Fellowship and spent a month living with and learning from the great master of illustration, Maurice Sendak, at his home in Connecticut. She was also awarded a bronze place for her unpublished children's illustrations in the 3x3 Magazine annual competition. She lives in London.

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