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Dissertation On Musical Taste
     

Dissertation On Musical Taste

by Thomas Hastings
 
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.

Overview

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780306710858
Publisher:
Da Capo Press
Publication date:
10/28/1974
Series:
Music Ser.
Pages:
228

Read an Excerpt


multitude of cases there exists no real necessity for such failure, we shall have performed a service not unprofitable to our readers, and have laid a foundation for future improvement. The topic will be occasionally resumed in the subsequent pages. Having spoken of instrumental and of vocal music, a single word on the subject of accompaniments shall close the present chapter. In the higher species of vocal composition, the instruments do not always hold a subordinate place. Occasionally they seem to form the chief object of attraction, while the voices are merely subsidiary. But in compositions of a simpler kind the case is reversed, the voice is the principal, and the instruments are subsidiary. Here, however, the art of playing an accompaniment is seldom rightly understood. It requires more talent of a specific kind than is usually supposed. It is perhaps the first thing to be attempted by the novice, and the last thing to be acquired by the proficient. The man who has but little skill upon his instrument, seeks at first to hide his imperfections by the softened touches of his hand. He executes with hesitation, and affords no real support to the singer. A little farther instructed, he grows confident, begins to play independently, and often to the singer's annoyance. Another stage of progress, and he comes to regard himself as the principal object of attraction; a mistake of which he is seldom fully convinced in after-life. The more skill in mechanical execution he acquires, the more reasonable it appears to him to claim the indulgence of display. To support the tones of the vocalist without drowning his articulation, to imitate his expression, to set off his excellences andcover his defects, and especially to copy his occasional imperfections, where they cannot be preve...

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