Divine Will and Human Choice: Freedom, Contingency, and Necessity in Early Modern Reformed Thought

Divine Will and Human Choice: Freedom, Contingency, and Necessity in Early Modern Reformed Thought

by Richard A. Muller

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781493406708
Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
Publication date: 05/02/2017
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 336
File size: 3 MB

About the Author

Richard A. Muller (PhD, Duke University) is P. J. Zondervan Professor of Historical Theology Emeritus and senior fellow of the Junius Institute for Digital Reformation Research at Calvin Theological Seminary in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He is the author of numerous books, including the multivolume Post-Reformation Reformed Dogmatics.
Richard A. Muller (PhD, Duke University) is P. J. Zondervan Professor of Historical Theology Emeritus and senior fellow of the Junius Institute for Digital Reformation Research at Calvin Theological Seminary in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He is the author of numerous books, including Divine Will and Human Choice, Calvin and the Reformed Tradition, The Unaccommodated Calvin, After Calvin, and the multivolume Post-Reformation Reformed Dogmatics.

Table of Contents

Contents

Part I: Freedom and Necessity in Reformed Thought: The Contemporary Debate
1. Introduction: The Present State of the Question
2. Reformed Thought and Synchronic Contingency: Logical and Historical Issues
Part II: Philosophical and Theological Backgrounds: Aristotle, Aquinas, and Duns Scotus
3. Aristotle and Aquinas on Necessity and Contingency
4. Duns Scotus and Late Medieval Perspectives on Freedom
Part III: Early Modern Reformed Perspectives: Contingency, Necessity, and Freedom in the Real Order of Being
5. Necessity, Contingency, and Freedom: Reformed Understandings
6. Scholastic Approaches to Necessity, Contingency, and Freedom: Early Modern Reformed Perspectives
7. Divine Power, Possibility, and Actuality
8. Divine Concurrence and Contingency
9. Conclusions

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