Dixieland Sushi

Dixieland Sushi

by Cara Lockwood
4.5 19

Paperback(Original)

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Dixieland Sushi 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm 29 years old and this book took me back to the 80's. I loved how you got to go back to those times when she was younger. It was so much fun yet still VERY up to date! Cara Lockwood's BEST yet!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Easy to read, amusing. I enjoy an author with a sense of humor and she portrayed herself and her family with respect and, yes, humor. It was fun following along and I didn't even bother to try to guess the ending and instead let the author tell the tale. A good read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book caught my eye recently while browsing @ B&N. As another Asian American woman growing up in a predominantly white community I TOTALLY related to this book. This is a great book and I'll definitely be sure to read the author's other books. So many other books I've read are funny, but this one really made me laugh out loud. The plot is great and characters realistic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was so entertaining and perfect. I loved the pace, the character development, the plot, etc. I have never read any of her books, but will I ever now. I am telling everyone I know about this book! Wax On! Wax Off!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was an amazing book for a car ride. It moved quickly, no slow spots. The characters were pretty realistic also. I didn't want to put it down. Highly recommended!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
While I've been a big fan of Lockwood's other work, this one is hands-down her funniest work yet! I was laughing out loud on the airplane. My apologies to the other folks on flight 1552. It's just that good.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Loved it, loved it, couldn't put it down. Light, lively fast reading. Funny and well written. Get it and devour it!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
As an Asian-American woman, I am attracted to novels with Asian references in the titles. I laughed out loud as I read this book. You fall in love with the Nakamura-Taylor clan and all of their idiosyncrocies. However, I gave it only 4 stars because Lockwood's explanations of common '80s references messes with the flow of the story.
harstan More than 1 year ago
While growing up in Arkansas with a Japanese American mother and White southerner father, Jen Nakamura Taylor felt like she never belonged. When she became old enough she moved to Chicago with plans to avoid her roots as much as possible. Her sister did likewise relocating to San Francisco. --- When cousin Lucy announces she and Kevin Peterson are to marry, the bride and her family including Jen¿s mother expects her to come for the ceremony. Unable to escape Jen needs to find a date, but not an Arkansas yokel. She persuades her best friend in the Windy City Nigel Riley to escort her home although she feels her boisterous clan will embarrass her in front of him. Riley has hidden his feelings for Jen that he keeps from her because he fears she only sees him as a pal. However, as she feels abashed by her family¿s antics, Riley seems to enjoy being with them. Jen starts to see things differently when she begins to realize they are her people and they love her just like she begins to see Riley in a different light. --- The aptly named DIXIELAND SUSHI is a terrific glimpse at the blending of races and cultures displaying how complex humanity truly is. Cara Lockwood switches back and forth between the present Jen and the teenage Jen so that the audience can see how much the younger felt displaced in Dixie while showing how the child becomes the adult. Though the ending seems less filling than the tasty tale that leads to it, readers will appreciate this deep chick lit look at interracial offspring.--- Harriet Klausner