ISBN-10:
145762012X
ISBN-13:
9781457620126
Pub. Date:
06/05/2015
Publisher:
Bedford/St. Martin's
Documenting United States History: Themes, Concepts, and Skills for the AP* Course

Documenting United States History: Themes, Concepts, and Skills for the AP* Course

by Jason Stacy, Stephen Heller
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781457620126
Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's
Publication date: 06/05/2015
Pages: 592
Sales rank: 489,300
Product dimensions: 6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Jason Stacy is associate professor of U. S. History and Social Science Pedagogy at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. Before joining the history department at SIUe, Stacy taught AP® U.S. History for eight years at Adlai E. Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire Illinois. Stacy has served as an AP® U.S. History Reader, Table Leader, Exam Leader, Consultant, Senior Auditor, and question author for the redesigned AP® U.S. History exam. 

Stacy is the author of Walt Whitman's Multitudes: Labor Reform and Persona in Whitman's Journalism and the First Leaves of Grass, 1840-1855 (2008), editor of Leaves of Grass, 1860: the 150th Anniversary Facsimile Edition (2009) and co-editor of Walt Whitman’s Selected Journalism (2015). His research has appeared in Social Education, the Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, and American Educational History and his reviews have appeared in American Literature, the Journal of American History, and the Walt Whitman Quarterly Review. Stacy is also a contributing editor for the Walt Whitman Archive. Since 2009, Stacy has served as editor-in-chief of The Councilor: A Journal of the Social Studies. He is a former president of the Illinois Council for the Social Studies (2014).

Stephen Heller has taught for 28 years in the Chicagoland area, the last 16 of which have been at Adlai E Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire, IL, where he teaches AP® English Language and Composition. Heller has served as a Question Leader, Table Leader, and Reader for the AP® English Language and Composition exam, and he recently completed a six year term on the AP® English Language and Composition Test Development Committee. A national and international College Board consultant for AP® and Pre-AP® English, Heller has also served as the College Board Adviser while on the Development Committee. Heller is also a contributing item writer for the revised SAT exam, and he also serves as a reader for the International Baccalaureate exam.

Heller's publications include co-authorship of two textbooks for pre-AP® and AP® English:  AP® English Bound (2009) and Entering the Conversation (2010), both with Peoples Publishing. Heller also was the editor in chief and served as a contributing author to the College Board's 2007 and 2013 workshop materials--"Using Sources" and "Expanding Definitions of Argument", respectively, as well as serving as a contributing author to the College Board's English Vertical Teams workshop. Heller's additional publications have appeared in English Journal, Social Education (a piece co-authored with Jason Stacy) and the Illinois Bulletin of English. 

Since 2007, Heller has teamed with Jason Stacy to teach American Themes in the AP® Classroom, a course that examines the skills common to both AP® English Language and AP® US History, and for many years this course has been offered at Carleton College, Northfield, MN. In 2006 Heller was recognized as an outstanding teacher by the US Department of Education as part of the Presidential Scholars program. Heller also serves on NCTE's Secondary Section Steering Committee.

Table of Contents

View the AP® Correlation Guide.

PERIOD ONE: 1491-1607

Chapter 1: First Contacts

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: The Diverse Societies of North America

Document 1.1: Gold Frog Ornaments, Mixtec, Southern Mexico, 15th to 16th Century

Document 1.2: Ruins of the Pueblo town of Cicuique, New Mexico, 16th Century

Document 1.3: Chief Powhatan’s Deerskin Cloak, Virginia, 1608

Topic II: Change and Exchange

Document 1.4: Christopher Columbus, Journal, 1492

Document 1.5: Images of Hernán Cortés Assisted by the Tlaxcalan People of Mexico, 1560

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: New Skill: Continuity/Change over Time

Topic III: Transatlantic Conquest

Document 1.6: Pope Paul III, Papal Bull: Sublimis Deus, 1537

Document 1.7: Bartolomé de las Casas, Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies, 1542

Document 1.8: Juan Ginés de Sepulveda, Concerning the Just Causes of the War against the Indians, 1547

Document 1.9: Transcript of the Spanish Trial in the Aftermath of a Pueblo Revolt, 1598

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: New Skill: Periodization

Document 1.10: Afonso I (Mbemba a Nzinga), Letter to John III, King of Portugal, 1526

Document 1.11: Jacques Cartier, Voyage to the St. Lawrence, 1534

Document 1.12: John Smith, The Generall Historie of Virginia, 1624

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: New Skill: Historical Causation

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: PreWriting

Working with Secondary Sources: AP® Short Answer Questions -

Native Americans, Europeans, and the Exchange of Misconceptions

PERIOD TWO: 1607-1754

Chapter 2: Colonial North America

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: Settling Atlantic North America

Document 2.1: Samuel de Champlain, Description of the French Fur Trade, 1608

Document 2.2: John Rolfe, Letter on Jamestown Settlement, 1618

Document 2.3: The Mayflower Compact, 1620

Document 2.4: John Winthrop, "A Model of Christian Charity," 1630

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Review: Historical Causation

Topic II: Conquest of Native North America

Document 2.5: Native Attack on Jamestown, 1622

Document 2.6: John Martin, "Proposal for Subjugating Native Americans," 1622

Document 2.7: Philip IV, Letter to Don Luis Valdés, 1647

Document 2.8: John Easton, A Relation of the Indian War, 1675

Document 2.9: Edward Randolph, Assessment of the Causes of King Philip’s War, 1675

Document 2.10: Nathaniel Bacon, "Declaration against Governor William Berkeley," 1676

Document 2.11: Experience Mayhew and Thomas Prince, Indian Converts…, 1727

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: New Skill: Comparison

Topic III: Slavery in the British Colonies

Document 2.12 Richard Ligon, Map of Barbados, 1657

Document 2.13 Virginia Slave Laws, 1662-1669

Document 2.14 Enslaved Africans to the Western Hemisphere, 1450-1900

Document 2.15 George Cato, "Account of the Stono Rebellion," 1739

Document 2.16 South Carolina Slave Code, 1740

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Review: Historical Causation; New Skill: Contextualization

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Comparison When Assembling Multiple Body Paragraphs

Chapter 3: Awakening, Enlightenment, and Empire in British North America

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: Strengthening Empire

Document 3.1: First Navigation Act of 1660

Document 3.2: Charter of the Royal African Company, 1662

Document 3.3: Commission for the Dominion of New England, 1688

Document 3.4: Map of North America, Eastern Seaboard, 1701

Document 3.5: Thomas Oliver, Letter to Queen Anne, 1708

Document 3.6: Treaty of Utrect, 1713

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Review: Historical Causation

Topic II: Transatlantic Ideas in a North American Context

Document 3.7: William Penn, Preface to "Frame of Government" 1682

Document 3.8: Letter from a Gentleman of the City of New York on Leisler’s Rebellion, 1689

Document 3.9: John Locke, "Second Treatise on Civil Government," 1690

Document 3.10: Image of John Winthrop IV, 1779

Document 3.11: Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard’s Almanac, 1739

Document 3.12: George Whitefield, "Marks of a True Conversion," 1739

Document 3.13: Jonathan Edwards, "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God," 1741

Document 3.14: Interior of St. James Anglican Church, 1711-1719

Document 3.15: Interior of Mt. Shiloh Baptist Church, 1700s

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Combining Skills Review: Comparison and Contextualization

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: The Subordinated Thesis Statement

Working with Secondary Sources: AP® Short Answer Questions -

How Puritan were the Puritans?

PERIOD THREE: 1754-1800

Chapter 4: An Atlantic Empire

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: Challenging an Empire

Document 4.1: North America before and after the French and Indian War, 1754-1763

Document 4.2: The Diary of William Trent, 1763

Document 4.3: The Stamp Act, 1765

Document 4.4: Patrick Henry, Virginia Resolves, 1765

Document 4.5: John Dickinson, "Letter from Farmer in Pennsylvania," 1767

Document 4.6: Testimony in the Trial of the British Soldiers of the Nineteenth Regiment of Foot, 1770

Document 4.7: Account of the Boston Tea Party, Massachusetts Gazette, 1773

Document 4.8: Memory of a British Officer Stationed at Lexington and Concord, Atlantic Monthly, April 19, 1775

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Patterns of Continuity and Change over Time; New Skill: Appropriate Use of Historical Evidence

Topic II: Entangling Alliances

Document 4.9: Treaty of Alliance between the United States and France, 1778

Document 4.10: Col. Daniel Brodhead, Letter to General George Washington on an American Expedition into Pro-British Iroquois Territory, 1779

Document 4.11: Treaty of Paris, 1783

Document 4.12: Thomas Jefferson, Letter to Thomas Pinckney, 1793

Document 4.13: Thomas Jefferson, Letter to James Monroe, 1795

Document 4.14: Anti-Jefferson Cartoon, "The Providential Detection," 1797

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Combining Skills: Historical Causation and Historical Argumentation

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: The Subordinated Thesis Statement and Appropriate Organization

Chapter 5: A Republic Envisioned and Revised

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: Rights-Based Government

Document 5.1: John Locke, "Two Treatises on Government," 1690

Document 5.2: Jonathan Mayhew, "Discourse Concerning Unlimited Submission and Non-Resistance to the Higher Powers," 1750

Document 5.3: Phillis Wheatley, "On Being Brought from Africa to America," 1770

Document 5.4: Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

Document 5.5: Abigail Adams, Letter to John Adams, 1776

Document 5.6: Thomas Jefferson, Declaration of Independence, 1776

Document 5.7: Abigail Adams, Letter to John Quincy Adams, 1780

Document 5.8: Franchise Restrictions in the Georgia State Constitution, 1777

Document 5.9: The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, 1781-1789

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Contextualization and Historical Argumentation

Topic II: Debating Liberty and Security

Document 5.10: "The Address and Reasons of Dissent of the Minority of the Convention of Pennsylvania to Their Constituents," 1787

Document 5.11: James Madison, Federalist No. 10, 1787

Document 5.12: Political Cartoon on Virginia’s Ratification of the Constitution, from the Boston Independent Chronicle, 1788

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Comparison and Historical Argumentation

Topic III: Reverberations

Document 5.13: Pennsylvania Act for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery, 1780

Document 5.14: US Constitution, Preamble, 1787

Document 5.15: US Constitution, Article I, Sections 2 and 9, 1787

Document 5.16: Declaration of the Rights of Man, 1789

Document 5.17: Toussaint L’Ouverture, Letter to the Directory, 1797

Document 5.18: Sedition Act, 1798

Document 5.19: Kentucky Resolution, 1799

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Appropriate Use of Relevant Historical Evidence

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Avoiding the Either/Or Fallacy in Historical Argument

Chapter 6: Growing Pains

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: The Perils and Possibilities of Expansion

Document 6.1: William Henry, Letter Regarding Attacks of Paxton Boys on Conestogo Indians in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 1763

Document 6.2: A Declaration and Remonstrance of the Distressed and Bleeding Frontier Inhabitants of the Province of Pennsylvania (Paxton Boys’ Declaration), 1764

Document 6.3: Father Junipero Serra, Letter to Father Palóu Regarding the Founding of Mission San Diego de Alcala in California, 1769

Document 6.4 Correspondence between Daniel Shays and Benjamin Lincoln, 1787

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Historical Causation and Historical Argumentation

Topic II: Securing Borders

Document 6.5: Northwest Ordinance, Key Sections, 1787

Document 6.6: Treaty of Greenville, Article 9, 1795

Document 6.7: Pinckney’s Treaty, Article IV, 1795

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Comparison and Appropriate Use of Relevant Historical Evidence

Topic III: Regional and National Identities

Document 6.8: James Peale, "The Artist and His Family," 1795

Document: 6.9: Thomas Jefferson, Letter to Philip Mazzei, 1796

Document 6.10: Isaac Weld, Travels throughout the States of North America, 1797

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Contextualization and Appropriate Use of Historical Evidence

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Historical Causation: The Linear Argument

Working with Secondary Sources: AP® Short Answer Questions -

Rationales for Revolution

PERIOD FOUR: 1800-1848

Chapter 7: Reform and Reaction

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: Factions and Federal Power

Document 7.1: James Monroe, Second Inaugural Address, 1821

Document 7.2: John C. Calhoun, Address to the Southern States, 1831

Document 7.3: James Madison, Letter to Mathew Carey, 1831

Document 7.4: Justice John Marshall, Worcester v. Georgia, 1832

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: New Skill: Interpretation

Topic II: Debating the Identity of America

Document 7.5: Lyman Beecher, "The Evils of Intemperance," 1827

Document 7.6: David Walker, "Walker's Appeal…to the Coloured Citizens of the World," 1830

Document 7.7: William Lloyd Garrison, The Liberator, 1831

Document 7.8: John C. Calhoun, "Slavery a Positive Good," 1837

Document 7.9: Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself, 1845

Document 7.10: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions, 1848

Document 7.11: Asher Durand, Dover Plains, 1850

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: New Skill: Synthesis

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Patterns in Historical Argument

Chapter 8: The Market Revolution

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: A Market Economy

Document 8.1: Eli Whitney, Petition for Renewal of Patent on Cotton Gin, 1812

Document 8.2: Election Ticket: Agriculture, Trade, Manufactures, 1828

Document 8.3: Advertisement of a South Carolina Slave Dealer, Thomas Griggs, 1835

Document 8.4: Joseph H. Davis, Family Portraits, 1832–1837

Document 8.5: Mike Walsh, "Meeting: Democratic Mechanics and Working Men of New York," 1842

Document 8.6: Harriet Robinson, Loom and Spindle: or, Life among the Early Mill Girls, 1898

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Patterns of Continuity and Change over Time and Interpretation

Topic II: The Politics of Growth

Document 8.7: John C. Calhoun, "South Carolina Exposition and Protest," 1828

Document 8.8: "General Jackson Slaying the Many-Headed Monster," 1836

Document 8.9: John L. O’Sullivan, "The Great Nation of Futurity," United States Democratic Review, 1839

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Synthesis

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Knowing What and When to Quote

Chapter 9: Expansionism: Part 1

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: Expansion, Compromise, and Conflict

Document 9.1: Map of the Louisiana Purchase, 1805

Document 9.2: Two Opinions on the Missouri Crisis, 1819

Document 9.3: Missouri Compromise of 1820

Document 9.4: Monroe Doctrine, 1823

Document 9.5: Indian Removal Act of 1830

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Historical Causation and Interpretation

Topic II: Destinies Manifested

Document 9.6: Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836

Document 9.7: "On the Webster-Ashburton Treaty," Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 1842

Document 9.8: Democratic Party Platform, 1844

Document 9.9: Parody of the Democratic Party, 1848

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Appropriate Use of Relevant Evidence, Causation, and Synthesis

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Organizing and Outlining a Reason-Based Historical Argument

Working with Secondary Sources: AP® Short Answer Questions -

Race and Democracy

PERIOD FIVE: 1844-1877

Chapter 10: Expansionism: Part 2

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: Conquest West

Document 10.1: James K. Polk, War Message, 1846

Document 10.2: Abraham Lincoln, "Spot Resolutions," 1847

Document 10.3: "Commodore Perry at the Loo Choo Isles," New York Daily Times, 1853

Document 10.4: American (or Know-Nothing) Party Platform, 1856

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Periodization and Comparison

Document 10.5: Homestead Act of 1862

Document 10.6: Report from the Spotted Tail Indian Agency, 1877

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Synthesis

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Counterarguments in Historical Essays

Chapter 11: The Union Undone?

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: The Breakdown of Compromise

Document 11.1: John C. Calhoun, "The Clay Compromise Measures," 1850

Document 11.2: Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, 1852

Document 11.3: Mary Henderson Eastman’s Aunt Phillis’s Cabin, 1852

Document 11.4: Map of Kansas-Nebraska Act, 1854

Document 11.5: Republican Campaign Song, 1856

Document 11.6: Roger B. Taney, Dred Scott v. Sandford, 1857

Document 11.7: Abraham Lincoln, Speech at Edwardsville, Illinois, 1858

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Appropriate Use of Historical Evidence and Contextualization

Topic II: Explaining Secession

Document 11.8: Jefferson Davis, Inaugural Address, 1861

Document 11.9: Abraham Lincoln, First Inaugural Address, 1861

Document 11.10: James E. Taylor, The Cause of the Rebellion, c. 1861

Document 11.11: Emily Dickinson, "Much Madness is Divinest Sense," 1862

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Comparison and Synthesis

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Addressing Exceptions in Historical argument: The Role of the Qualifier

Chapter 12 War and Emancipation

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I Emancipation

Document 12.1: "What to Do with the Slaves When Emancipated," New York Herald, 1862

Document 12.2: Abraham Lincoln, Letter to Horace Greeley, 1862

Document 12.3: Abraham Lincoln, Emancipation Proclamation, 1862

Document 12.4: "President Lincoln and His Scheme of Emancipation," Charleston Mercury, 1862

Document 12.5: Thomas Nast, "The Emancipation of the Negroes, January, 1863—The Past and the Future," Harper’s Weekly, 1863

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Comparison, Contextualization, and Historical Argumentation

Topic II Total War

Document 12.6: Ulysses S. Grant, Memoirs, 1885

Document 12.7: Call for Black Troops, 1863

Document 12.8: Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg Address, 1863

Document 12.9: "Emancipation of the Slaves by the Confederate Government," Charleston Mercury, 1864

Document 12.10 Ruins of Richmond, 1865

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Historical Causation and Periodization

Topic III Reconstruction

Document 12.11: Anti-Reconstruction Cartoon, Independent Monitor, 1868

Document 12.12: Fourteen and Fifteenth Amendments, 1868 and 1870

Document 12.13: Thomas Nast, "This Is a White Man’s Government," 1874

Document 12.14: Sharecropper Contract, 1882

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills Skill Review: Comparison, Interpretation and Synthesis

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Beginning an Argument with Sources: The Preliminary Claim

Working with Secondary Sources: AP® Short Answer Questions -

Reconstructions

PERIOD SIX: 1865-1898

Chapter 13 A Gilded Age

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I The New Economy

Document 13.1 Completion of the Transcontinental Railroad at Promontory Point, 1869

Document 13.2 Henry Grady, "The New South," 1886

Document 13.3 Joseph Keppler, "Bosses of the Senate," Puck, 1889

Document 13.4 New Year’s Greetings in Puck, 1898

Document 13.5 John Foster, Memo to President Grover Cleveland, 1893

Document 13.6 Andrew Carnegie, "The Gospel of Wealth," 1889

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills Skill Review: Contextualization

Topic II Discontents of the New Economy

Document 13.7 "Hopelessly Bound to the Stake," Puck, 1883

Document 13.8 Reaction to African American Agricultural Activism, St. Louis Globe-Democrat, 1889

Document 13.9 Las Gorras Blancas, Nuestra Platforma, 1890

Document 13.10 Jacob Riis, How the Other Half Lives, 1890

Document 13.11 Benjamin Harrison, Presidential Proclamation, Wyoming, 1891

Document 13.12 People’s Party Platform, 1892

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Historical Causation and Continuity and Change over Time

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills Contextualizing Historical Argument

Chapter 14 The Throes of Assimilation

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I The Western War against Native Peoples

Document 14.1 Columbus Delano, Testimony before the House Committee on Military Affairs, 1874

Document 14.2 General Philip Sheridan, Description of Custer’s Battlefield, 1876

Document 14.3 "Educating the Indians," Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, 1884

Document 14.4 Dawes Allotment Act, 1887

Document 14.5 "Consistency," Puck, 1891

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills Skill Review: Contextualization and Comparison

Topic II The New Urban Environment

Document 14.6 Jane Addams, Twenty Years at Hull House, 1900

Document 14.7 George Washington Plunkitt, "Honest Graft and Dishonest Graft," 1905

Document 14.8 Forrester B. Washington, A Study of Negro Employees of Apartment Houses in New York City, 1916

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills Skill Review: Interpretation and Synthesis

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Synthesizing Themes in Historical Argument

Chapter 15 New Ideas and Old Ideas in the New Industrial Age

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I Reform Impulses

Document 15.1 Women of Lorain County, Petition against Woman Suffrage, 1870

Document 15.2 Susan B. Anthony, Speech in Support of Woman Suffrage, 1873

Document 15.3 "A Model Office Seeker," Puck, 1881

Document 15.4 Chinese Exclusion Act, 1882

Document 15.5 Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward, 2000–1887, 1887

Document 15.6, Andrew Carnegie, Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie, 1920

Document 15.7 Robert M. LaFollette, "The Danger Threatening Representative Government," 1897

Document 15.8 Daniel DeLeon, "What Means This Strike?," 1898

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills Skill Review: Periodization and Historical Argumentation

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Periodization in Writing Historical Arguments

Working with Secondary Sources: AP® Short Answer Questions -

Economic Consolidation

PERIOD SEVEN: 1890-1945

Chapter 16 Prosperity and Reform

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I The Consumer’s City

Document 16.1 United States Strike Commission, Report on the Chicago Strike, 1894

Document 16.2 Louis Gilrod and David Meyrowitz, "A Boychik Up-to-Date," c. 1900

Document 16.3Luna Park, Coney Island, 1908

Document 16.4 Two Women Reading Employment Advertisements, 1909

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills Skill Review: Contextualization

Topic II The Progressive Critique and New Deal Response

Document 16.5 Lincoln Steffens, The Shame of the Cities, 1904

Document 16.6 Upton Sinclair, The Jungle, 1906

Document 16.7 Ida M. Tarbell, The Business of Being a Woman, 1921

Document 16.8 Clifford K. Berryman, "Dr. New Deal," 1934

Document 16.9 Franklin D. Roosevelt, Message to Congress on Making the Civilian Conservation Corps a Permanent Agency, 1935

Document 16.10Clifford K. Berryman, "Old Reliable," c. 1938

Document 16.11 Charles Fusco, Interview on the New Deal, 1938

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills Skill Review: Patterns of Continuity and Change over Time

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills Evaluating Evidence: Discovering Turning Points

Chapter 17 Challenges to the Status Quo

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I Modernity

Document 17.1 Chicago Streetcar, 1900

Document 17.2 "Our Superb 1914 Model Peerless Bicycle," 1914

Document 17.3 Model T Fords Coming Off the Assembly Line, 1900

Document 17.4 Clarence Darrow versus William Jennings Bryan, 1925

Document 17.5 F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, 1925

Document 17.6 Zora Neale Hurston, "How It Feels to Be Colored Me," 1928

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills Skill Review: Continuity and Change over Time, Contextualization, and Historical Argumentation

Topic II Challenges to Civil Liberties

Document 17.7 Espionage Act, 1917

Document 17.8 Sedition Act, 1918

Document 17.9 Eugene Debs, Speech in Canton, Ohio, 1918

Document 17.10 Meeting of the Communist Labor Party, New York Times, 1919

Document 17.11 John Vachon, Picket Line, Chicago, 1941

Document 17.12 Lawrence E. Davies, "Zoot Suits Become Issue on Coast," New York Times, 1943

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills Skill Review: Comparison, Appropriate Use of Evidence, and Contextualization

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills Evaluating Context and Multiple Perspectives

Chapter 18: Isolated No More

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: From Frontier to Empire

Document 18.1: Frederick Jackson Turner on the Closing of the Frontier, 1893

Document 18.2: U.S. Diplomatic Cable to Spanish Ambassador, 1898

Document 18.3: Platform of the American Anti­Imperialist League, 1899

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Periodization, Continuity and Change over Time, Historical Causation, and Historical Argumentation

Topic II: War in the Name of Democracy?

Document 18.4: Woodrow Wilson, Remarks to the Senate, 1917

Document 18.5: Woodrow Wilson, On the League of Nations, 1919

Document 18.6: Kellogg-Briand Pact, 1928

Document 18.7: Russell Lee, Japanese American Child on the Way to Internment, 1942

Document 18.8: "Rosie the Riveter," Office of War Information, 1943

Document 18.9: Carl Murphy, An Open Letter Home during World War II, 1943

Document 18.10: Franklin Delano Roosevelt, State of the Union Address, 1944

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Patterns of Continuity and Change over Time, Comparison, and Synthesis

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Implications in Historical Argument

Working with Secondary Sources: AP® Short Answer Questions -

International and Grassroots Progressivism

PERIOD EIGHT: 1945-1980

Chapter 19: Containment and Conflict

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: The Origins of the Cold War

Document 19.1: Harry S. Truman, On Atomic Technology, 1945

Document 19.2: George F. Kennan, The Long Telegram, 1946

Document 19.3: Harry S. Truman, On Greece and Turkey,1947

Document 19.4: John N. Wheeler, Letter Home from Korean War, 1950

Document 19.5: Central Intelligence Agency, A Study of Assassination, 1953

Document 19.6: Pete Seeger, Testimony before the House Un-American Activities Committee, 1955

Document 19.7: Dwight D. Eisenhower, Farewell Address, 1961

Document 19.8: Nikita Khrushchev, Diplomatic Cable to Fidel Castro, 1962

Document 19.9: The Commune Comes to America, Life, 1969

Document 19.10: Jimmy Carter, Inaugural Address, 1977

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Contextualization and Interpretation

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Organizing Themes in Historical Arguments

Chapter 20: The Breakdown of Consensus

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: The Beginnings of the Modern Civil Rights Movement

Document 20.1: Dwight D. Eisenhower, On Earl Warren and the Brown Decision, 1954

Document 20.2: Students for a Democratic Society, Port Huron Statement, 1962

Document 20.3: Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique, 1963

Document 20.4 Martin Luther King, Jr., "I Have a Dream," 1963

Document 20.5: Civil Rights Act of 1964

Document 20.6: Caesar Chavez, "We Shall Overcome," 1965

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Historical Causation and Historical Argumentation

Topic II: The Shattering Consensus

Document 20.7: Lyndon B. Johnson Campaign Poster, 1967

Document 20.8: H. Rap Brown, Speech at Free Huey Rally, 1968

Document 20.9: Martin Luther King, Jr. Address at Mason Temple, Memphis, 1968

Document 20.10: Edmund White: Letter to Ann and Alfred Corn, 1969

Document 20.11: The Weatherman Underground, Communiqué No. 1, 1970

Document 20.12: American Indian Movement, 20 Point Proposal, 1972

Document 20.13: Ronald Reagan, Address to the First Conservative Political Action Conference, 1974

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Historical Causation, Periodization, and Interpretation

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Analyzing and Evaluating Persona in Documents

Chapter 21: Discontinuities

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: Conflicting Post-War Visions

Document 21.1: Levittown, early 1948

Document 21.2: William Faulkner, Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech, 1950

Document 21.3: Trans World Airlines Advertisement, 1953

Document 21.4: Senate Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency, Interim Report on Comic Books and Juvenile Delinquency, 1955

Document 21.5: Rachel Carson, Silent Spring, 1962

Document 21.6: Abbie Hoffman, Steal This Book, 1970

Document 21.7: Governor’s Investigating Committee on Problems of Wisconsin’s Spanish-Speaking Communities, Report to the Governor, 1971

Document 21.8: Phyllis Schlafly, Interview with the Washington Star, 1976

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Historical Causation, Use of Relevant Evidence, Interpretation, and Synthesis

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Incorporating Secondary Sources into Historical Argument

Working with Secondary Sources: AP® Short Answer Questions -

Civil Rights Leadership

PERIOD NINE: 1980-Present

Chapter 22: A Conservative Tenor

Seeking the Main Point

Topic I: An End to the Twentieth Century

Document 22.1: President Jimmy Carter, "Crisis of Confidence," 1979

Document 22.2: Reginald Stuart, "Michigan Requests Federal Loan to Bolster Unemployment Fund," The New York Times, 1980

Document 22.3: "Morning in America" Campaign Television Commercial, 1984

Document 22.4: Ronald Reagan, Speech at the Berlin Wall, 1987

Document 22.5: Ronald Reagan, Speech at the University of Virginia, 1988

Document 22.6: Francis Fukuyama, "The End of History?" National Interest, 1989

Document 22.7: Bill Clinton, Address on Health Care Reform, 1993

Document 22.8: Republican Party, "Contract With America," 1994

Document 22.9: Southern Baptist Convention, "Resolution On Homosexual Marriage," 1996

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Contextualization and Synthesis

Topic II: An End to History’s End

Document 22.10: George W. Bush, Presidential Nomination Acceptance Speech, 2000

Document 22.11: Office of the President, Proposal to Create the Department of Homeland Security, 2002

Document 22.12: George W. Bush, On Iraq, 2003

Document 22.13: George W. Bush, On Social Security Reform, 2005

Document 22.14: United Nations, Kyoto Protocol on Emissions, 2008

Document 22.15: Border Fence with Mexico, 2009

Document 22.16: Barack Obama, Address to Congress on Health Care, 2011

Document 22.17: Barack Obama, Speech on Middle East, 2011

Document 22.18: Sam Schlinkert, "Facebook is Invading Your Phone," The Daily Beast, 2013

Document 22.19: Jennifer Medina, "New Suburban Dream Born of Asia and Southern California," New York Times, 2013

Applying AP® Historical Thinking Skills: Skill Review: Periodization and Comparison

Putting It All Together: Revisiting the Main Point

Building AP® Writing Skills: Rethinking Audience and Voice in Primary Documents

Working with Secondary Sources: AP® Short Answer Questions

The New Right

Acknowledgments

Index

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